Without nuclear power, the world’s climate challenge will get a whole lot harder

The Covid-19 crisis not only delivered an unprecedented shock to the world economy. It also underscored the scale of the climate challenge we face: Even in the current deep recession, global carbon emissions remain unsustainable.



a sunset in the background: White steam billows from the Cattenom nuclear power plant, at sunset in Cattenom, eastern France, on June 2, 2020. - Cattenom is the ninth largest nuclear power station in the world. (Photo by SEBASTIEN BERDA / AFP) (Photo by SEBASTIEN BERDA/AFP via Getty Images)


© Sebastien Berda/AFP/Getty Images
White steam billows from the Cattenom nuclear power plant, at sunset in Cattenom, eastern France, on June 2, 2020. – Cattenom is the ninth largest nuclear power station in the world. (Photo by SEBASTIEN BERDA / AFP) (Photo by SEBASTIEN BERDA/AFP via Getty Images)

If the world is to meet energy security and climate goals, clean energy must be at the core of post-Covid-19 economic recovery efforts. Strong growth in wind and solar energy and in the use of electric cars gives us grounds for hope, as does the promise of emerging technologies like hydrogen and carbon capture. But the scale of the challenge means we cannot afford to exclude any

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How much more abuse do female politicians face? A lot.

On Monday, the Institute for Strategic Dialogue, a London-based think tank that researches extremism, released some timely data showing that some of the same politicians calling out Twitter’s inaction are indeed facing more attacks online than other politicians. 

The study: Researchers collected publicly tagged mentions on Twitter and Facebook for a handful of politicians for two weeks in June and July, scrutinizing them manually and using AI to identify abusive posts. 

Overall, researchers found that women and people of color were “far more likely than men to be abused on Twitter.” They found that women received an average of 12% more abuse on Facebook than male politicians. Between 5% and 10% of mentions of most male politicians were considered abusive, while mentions of female politicians on Twitter contained abuse between 15% and 39% of the time. 

Overall, women were targeted much more personally by the tweets in the study. While

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A lot of older Macs won’t be able to watch 4K Netflix this fall because of a missing chip

macOS Big Sur, Apple’s upcoming release of its Mac operating system, will finally let you watch 4K HDR Netflix content, but it turns out it’ll only work on 2018 or later Macs with Apple’s T2 security chip, according to a new Netflix support document (via Apple Terminal).

That means the full list of Macs that can watch 4K content on Netflix, at least for now, is as follows:

  • iMac (2020)
  • iMac Pro
  • Mac Pro (2019)
  • Mac mini (2018)
  • MacBook Air (2018 or later)
  • MacBook Pro (2018 or later)

There’s an easy way to check whether your Mac has a T2 chip, as Apple points out on its website.

Disappointingly, older iMacs and pre-2018 Mac laptops that could theoretically play Netflix 4K content, whether on their built-in displays or via an 4K or 5K external monitor, won’t be able to. It’s not clear why the T2 security chip is required:

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Tesla’s battery day ended with no battery and a lot of unanswered questions

Tesla’s battery day has come and gone, leaving many experts scratching their heads over what they saw. Instead of the anticipated “million mile” battery we got a series of plans: a plan to manufacture Tesla’s own battery; a plan to process the raw materials; even a plan to mine its own lithium.

And while some of those plans sounded genuinely impressive, some experts were left with the impression that Tesla was headed into uncharted waters without a clear sense of direction.

“I came out of it with a confused message about what they’re doing with the [battery] supply chain,” said Vivas Kumar, Tesla’s former battery supply chain manager and currently a principal at Benchmark Mineral Intelligence, during a post-battery day webinar.

The Verge reached out to a battery researcher, an automotive expert,

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