Social dilemmas about protective measures — ScienceDaily

We need to know about these psychological and social profiles so we can understand how protective actions against contagious diseases are adopted, and then define the correct preventive approaches. At the very start of the coronavirus crisis — before restrictive measures were taken — a team of health behaviour specialists from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) managed to collect a large amount of data about the adoption of protective measures.

Through a study published in the journal Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being, the Geneva psychologists analysed how people in Britain followed the precautions recommended in their country. The study focuses on how the behaviour of others influences individual decision-making, known as the social dilemma. It notes that beliefs about COVID-19, such as thinking that the disease is dangerous or feelings of vulnerability, have little impact on whether or not an individual takes up protective measures. The people least likely

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A new thermometer measures temperature with sound

A new device eavesdrops on objects to take their temperatures.

Hot objects not only glow, but also softly hum. The hum is generated by the rapid jitters of particles that make up the hot object. If human ears were keen enough to hear this noise, “it would sound like radio static,” says Tom Purdy of the University of Pittsburgh. “The hotter [an object] gets, the louder it gets.”

Purdy, along with Robinjeet Singh of the University of Maryland in College Park, created an acoustic thermometer that senses the intensity of heat-generated sound emanating from nearby objects. The heart of the device is a one-square-millimeter sheet of silicon nitride. That sheet is suspended within a window cut in the center of a silicon chip, which transmits sound waves better than air.

In experiments, the physicists deposited blobs of an epoxy material on the chip’s surface around the silicon nitride sheet. When

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Spellbreak Update 1.1 Fixes Bugs, Adds Anti-Cheat Measures, And Smooths Out Aiming Issues

Spellbreak, a free-to-play battle royale where every player has an elemental power to fight with, has received its first major update. The game, which launched on PC, Switch, PS4, and Xbox One on September 3, has updated to version 1.1, and has fixed numerous bugs and issues in the process.

Update 1.1 brings several fixes to Spellbreak across all platforms, as well as some system-specific changes for each different version of the game. It doesn’t add any major new features, but instead focuses on tweaking and improving what is already there.

“We wanted the focus of this one to be on stability and performance across all of our platforms,” the Spellbreak blog reads before detailing the patch notes.

The complete patch notes for Spellbreak Update 1.1 are below.

Gameplay

  • The Lighting Bolts spell’s recovery animation can now be interrupted by casting a sorcery.
  • Fix edge case where reviving or exiling
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In study, 15 patients with long-term PD and chronic pain and mobility impairment showed improvements across multiple measures — ScienceDaily

A team of researchers in the United States and Japan reports that spinal cord stimulation (SCS) measurably decreased pain and reduced motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, both as a singular therapy and as a “salvage therapy” after deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapies were ineffective.

Writing in the September 28, 2020 issue of Bioelectronic Medicine, first author Krishnan Chakravarthy, MD, PhD, assistant professor of anesthesiology at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, and colleagues recruited 15 patients with Parkinson’s disease, a neurodegenerative disorder that is commonly characterized by physical symptoms, such as tremors and progressive difficulty walking and talking, and non-motor symptoms, such as pain and mental or behavioral changes.

The mean age of the patients was 74, with an average disease duration of 17 years. All of the patients were experiencing pain not alleviated by previous treatments. Eight had undergone earlier DBS, a non-invasive, pain therapy in

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Europe Increases Preventative Measures to Fight Megafires

Residents watch a wildfire in the town of Rafina, near Athens, Greece in July 2018. Mediterranean nations have spent around 200 billion euros in the past two decades to build up some of the world’s largest firefighting forces. 

Photographer: Angelos Tzortzinis/AFP via Getty Images

Climate change is fueling megafires that can’t be extinguished with helicopters and fire trucks, so Europe’s most fire-prone region has come up with new ways to protect forests. In many parts of the continent, countries are letting smaller fires burn, using historic data to model future fire behavior and offering subsidies to encourage land owners and people living close to forests to manage them properly. Over the long term, the goal is to turn forest management into a profitable activity that can also revive rural economies.

“There are a number of different tools and the secret is combining all that’s

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New security measures could block one-third of online EU purchases


New European rules on Strong Customer Authentication (SCA) could block more than one-third of online purchases and cost merchants more than $100 billion in lost sales, according to an analyis by payments consultancy CMSPI.

The consultancy says problems will arise for e-commerce merchants beginning January with the introduction of 3D-Secure Version 2.0, an authentication protocol developed by the major card schemes.

The CMSPI report describes the technology as “relatively new and unproven”, adding “significant unnecessary friction to the online commerce experience.”

With the new security protocol adding between 60 seconds and two minutes to the checkout process, testing shows 25% of 3DS2 transactions are abandoned by consumers, compared with single-digit numbers without the technology.

Overall, as many as 35% of 3DS2 transactions fail to go through, either because they are declined, abandoned by frustrated consumers or because of technical errors. If not corrected, that would amount to €108.1 billion

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To reach the Paris climate goals, decade-long measures are needed — ScienceDaily

Based on current data measured in the energy, industry, and mobility sectors, restrictions of social life during the corona pandemic can be predicted to lead to a reduction of worldwide carbon dioxide emissions by up to eight percent in 2020. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), cumulative reductions of about this magnitude would be required every year to reach the goals of the Paris Agreement by 2030. Recent measurements by researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) revealed that concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere has not yet changed due to the estimated emission reductions. The results are reported in Remote Sensing (DOI: 10.3390/rs12152387).

The corona pandemic has changed both our working and our private lives. People increasingly work from home, have video conferences instead of business trips, and spend their holidays in their home country. The lower traffic volume also reduces CO

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