Meet the New Innovators: 6 Entrepreneurs Building the Future of the Art World, Now

A version of this article first appeared in the fall 2020 Artnet Intelligence Report, which you can download for free here. 

These founders, visionaries, and upstarts are part of Artnet’s New Innovators List. Whether developing new software or constructing novel platforms for exchange, these six innovators remind us that you can’t build the future with outmoded tools.

See the complete list of the New Innovators here and check back for more in-depth profiles in the coming days.

 

Tyler Woolcott, 38, Director of StudioVisit, London

Tyler Woolcott, Owner StudioVisit London.

Tyler Woolcott, Owner StudioVisit London.

Thanks to Tyler Woolcott, artists can now make much-needed money by offering bespoke visits to their studios, priced up to £250 per person. “They are fully in control,” Woolcott says. “StudioVisit gives artists the tools to become a self-sustaining, independent institution.” The expat American has nearly 40 artists on his books—and the list is growing. Tours are by necessity mostly virtual

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Google launches Meet breakout rooms for small group discussions

Huge online classes can be overwhelming, not just for teachers but also for students who learn better when interacting with others. To help solve that problem, Google has launched a new Meet feature called “breakout rooms,” which would give educators a way to divide participants into smaller groups during video calls. At the moment, the feature is exclusively available to Enterprise for Education customers, but the tech giant says it will be available to more users (including Education and standard Enterprise customers) later this year.

Google said the ability to group people and put them smaller rooms was highly requested, since it has the potential to increase engagement by allowing simultaneous small group discussions. The call’s creator can make up to 100 breakout rooms in a call. Participants will be randomly and evenly distributed across the rooms, but the organizer can manually move them into different rooms if needed. Moderators

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Zoologists uncover new example of rapid evolution — meet the Sulawesi Babblers — ScienceDaily

Zoologists from Trinity College Dublin, working in tropical Southeast Asia, have uncovered a modern-day example of rapid evolution in action.

The zoologists have discovered that male and female Sulawesi Babblers (Pellorneum celebense, a species of bird) have evolved to attain different sizes on small islands, and in quick-fire time. They believe this is most likely due to evolutionary pressure favouring such “dimorphism” because the birds are able to reduce competition with each other by feeding on different, scarce resources.

The research, completed with the support of the Irish Research Council and collaborators in Universitas Halu Oleo, is published today in the journal Biotropica. The research shows that the males of the Sulawesi Babbler grow to be up to 15% larger than the females — with this difference particularly marked on the smaller islands.

Fionn Ó Marcaigh, first author on the paper and a PhD Candidate in Trinity’s

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NASA Ingenuity: Meet the woman launching a helicopter on Mars

What does it take to build a helicopter to fly on Mars? 

For starters, you can forget the remote control. Mars is more than 30 million miles away on a good day, so the time delay in sending and receiving signals means you couldn’t fly the spacecraft with a joystick — you have to send waypoints in advance from here on Earth and hope for the best. 

MiMi Aung, project leader of NASA’s Mars Ingenuity Helicopter Project, observes a flight test with JPL engineers Teddy Tzanetos (left) and Bob Balaram. 


NASA/JPL-Caltech

It also needs to charge itself. And it has to be able to take off in the incredibly thin Martian atmosphere (roughly 100 times thinner than Earth’s atmosphere), meaning the entire helicopter — including solar panel, batteries, computers, rotors and landing gear — has to weigh less than 4 pounds. And how do you test it in a simulated

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Google, Oracle meet in copyright clash at Supreme Court

WASHINGTON (AP) — Tech giants Google and Oracle are clashing at the Supreme Court in a copyright dispute that’s worth billions and important to the future of software development.

The case before the justices Wednesday has to do with Google’s creation of the Android operating system now used on the vast majority of smartphones worldwide. Google says that to create Android, which was released in 2007, it wrote millions of lines of new computer code. But it also used 11,330 lines of code and an organization that’s part of Oracle’s Java platform.

Google has defended its actions, saying what it did is long-settled, common practice in the industry, a practice that has been good for technical progress. But Oracle says Google “committed an egregious act of plagiarism” and sued, seeking more than $8 billion.

The case has been going on for a decade. Google won the first round when a

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Meet the Lawyers Behind the Upcoming U.S./Google Antitrust Showdown | Top News

(Reuters) – The U.S. antitrust case against Alphabet Inc’s Google will spotlight two lawyers better known for behind-the-scenes counseling: Justice Department attorney Ryan Shores, who is putting together the case, and Google executive Kent Walker, who is calling the shots on the search engine company’s defense.

Both parties could still add legal firepower to litigate the case, especially if it goes to trial. The lawsuit could be filed as early as next week.

Here are some details on Shores and Walker.

Shores joined the Justice Department last year to spearhead the Google investigation. He is working closely with Jeffrey Rosen, the second-in-command at the department behind Attorney General Bill Barr.

Shores has spent his career at elite law firms, most recently Shearman & Sterling, where he defended corporations like Bank of America and the oil company Equinor against antitrust claims.

Shores grew up in the Florida Panhandle, attended Huntingdon College

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Meet the 2020 SN 10 scientists

In the midst of a pandemic that has brought so much worry and loss, it’s natural to want to help — to do some small part to solve a problem, to counter pain, or to, importantly, remind others that there is beauty and wonder in the world. Scientists have long been doing just that. Many are chasing answers to the myriad challenges that people face every day, and revealing the rewards in the pursuit of knowledge itself. It’s in that spirit that we present this year’s SN 10: Scientists to Watch.

For the sixth consecutive year, Science News is featuring 10 early- and mid-career scientists who are pushing the boundaries of scientific inquiry. Some of the researchers are asking questions with huge societal importance: How do we prevent teen suicide? What are the ingredients in wildfire smoke that are damaging to health? Is there a better way to monitor earthquakes

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Meet the UK robotic tech company making the 2020 elite London Marathon possible

The starting gun for the 2020 London Marathon will finally be fired this weekend, and it is down in large part to one British tech company’s device.

The major event will look nothing like it did in previous years.

Instead of competing along miles of tarmac, cheered on by stands packed with supporters, just 100 elite runners will be taking part in a collective marathon in the “secure biosphere environment” of a closed-loop circuit around St James’s Park, whilst more than 45,000 people will be completing their 26.2 mile route “virtually” this Sunday – running on their usual practice routes.

But it is still a big moment. The race will be the first major marathon to take place anywhere in the world since the Covid-19 pandemic broke out, and as a result safety is a priority.


The Bump wearable device looks like a small disc (Tharsus)

The ultimate priority for

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Ninety Percent of U.S. Cars Must Be Electric by 2050 to Meet Climate Goals

The United States is not expected to electrify passenger cars fast enough to stay on track with the Paris climate accord’s goal of limiting global warming to 2 degrees Celsius, according to a new study.

Published in the journal Nature Climate Change yesterday, the study by engineers at the University of Toronto concludes that 90% of light-duty cars on American roads would need to be electric by 2050 to keep the transportation sector in line with climate mitigation targets.

That might mean requiring all of the nation’s new car sales to be electric as early as 2035, the state target established by California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) in an announcement last week.

The prospect of a national ban on gasoline-fueled cars emerged throughout the Democratic primaries, where several candidates proposed a 100% EV sales policy for 2035 or earlier. Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden favors the idea of phasing out

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Thinkific Raises $22M to Meet Surging Demand in Online Courses

  • Revenue generated by Thinkific course creators surpassed half a billion dollars and is expected to top 1.5 billion dollars in 2021

  • 50,000 course creators use Thinkific to educate over 25 million people

  • Thinkific is experiencing close to 150% year-over-year revenue growth

Thinkific, the leading platform for creating and selling online courses, today announced it has closed $22M in growth financing. The round was led by Vancouver-based Rhino Ventures, who were early investors in the company, and brings the total raised to date to $25M.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20200929005148/en/

Thinkific, the leading platform for creating and selling online courses (Photo: Business Wire)

Thinkific has been profitable since 2018 yet chose to raise additional funding to accelerate product innovation and continue shaping the future of online courses. “Thinkific is changing the face of digital commerce by empowering every entrepreneur and business to earn revenue and

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