Polar ice, atmospheric water vapor biggest drivers of variation among climate models — ScienceDaily

A Florida State University researcher is part of a team that has found varying projections on global warming trends put forth by climate change scientists can be explained by differing models’ predictions regarding ice loss and atmospheric water vapor.

The work will help climate scientists reconcile various models to improve their accuracy, said Florida State University Meteorology Professor Ming Cai, one of the authors of the study published in Nature Communications .

Climate scientists agree that the Earth’s surface temperature is warming, but the details of exactly where and by how much are less clear. A worst-case climate change scenario (known as the “Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5”) predicted a likely increase in average global temperatures of about 2.6 degrees Celsius to 4.8 degrees Celsius (or about 4.7 degrees Fahrenheit to 8.6 degrees Fahrenheit) by 2100.

“This uncertainty limits our ability to foresee the severity of the global warming impacts on

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USGS Director James Reilly released a study on polar bears he had stalled for months on Friday

In response to the Post report, Reilly sent an email to his staff the next day, saying his decision to delay was justified because he wanted to be “satisfied” with its underlying science before making it public.

The study, which had been obtained by The Post last month, notes that shrinking sea ice in the Arctic threatens the survival of polar bears while enhancing the opportunity for fossil fuel exploration there. “The long-term persistence of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) is threatened by sea-ice loss due to climate change, which is concurrently providing an opportunity in the Arctic for increased anthropogenic activities including natural resource extraction,” it said.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service had been seeking the report’s release for at least three months, according to several individuals briefed on the matter who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss internal deliberations. The agency is legally required

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The Trump Administration Hid Polar Bear Research

The Trump administration doesn’t care about these guys.

The Trump administration doesn’t care about these guys.
Photo: BJ Kirschhoffer/Polar Bears International

A federal study found that oil and gas drilling in Alaska puts polar bears at risk. But U.S. Geological Survey Director James Reilly, the head of the department that conducted the research, refused to make the study public, the Washington Post reported on Wednesday.

The Interior Department’s research looked into the number of polar bears that den and give birth on Alaska’s North Slope near the southern Beaufort Sea. The Trump administration has moved to open up that area to oil and gas drilling and exploration.

Internal memos also obtained by the Post show that the federal research has been complete for at least three months, but Reilly held it up, raising questions about its method of counting polar bear dens and why it uses data collected by a former agency scientist who now works for

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USGS Director James Reilly holds up polar bear study that could affect Trump’s drilling plans for Alaska

In an unusual move, U.S. Geological Survey Director James Reilly has refused to make public the study, by his own scientists, of the number of female polar bears that den and give birth on land near the southern Beaufort Sea. That is the same area that overlaps with federal land the Trump administration has opened up to oil and natural-gas development.

The study has been ready for at least three months. But Reilly — a geologist by training and former astronaut — has questioned why it uses data collected by a former agency scientist now working for an advocacy group and why it does not count each polar bear den individually, among other things, according to internal memos obtained by The Post.

The study, also obtained by The Post, notes that shrinking sea ice in the Arctic threatens the survival of polar bears while enhancing the opportunity for oil and

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iOS 14.2 Beta 2 Adds New Emoji Characters like Ninja, Pinata, Bubble Tea, Polar Bear and More

The second beta of iOS 14.2 introduces the new Emoji 13 characters that Apple previewed earlier this year as part of World Emoji Day.


New emoji options include ninja, people hugging, black cat, bison, fly, polar bear, blueberries, fondue, bubble tea, and more, with a list below.

  • Faces – Smiling Face with Tear, Disguised Face
  • People – Ninja, Person in Tuxedo, Woman in Tuxedo, Person with Veil, Man with Veil, Woman Feeding Baby, Person Feeding Baby, Man Feeding Baby, Mx. Claus, People Hugging
  • Body Parts – Pinched fingers, Anatomical Heart, Lungs
  • Animals – Black Cat, Bison, Mammoth, Beaver, Polar Bear, Dodo, Seal, Beetle, Cockroach, Fly, Worm
  • Food – Blueberries, Olive, Bell Pepper, Flatbread, Fondue, Bubble Tea, Tamale
  • Household – Potted Plant, Teapot, Piñata, Magic Wand, Nesting Dolls, Sewing Needle, Mirror, Window, Plunger, Mouse Trap, Bucket, Toothbrush
  • Miscellaneous – Feather, Rock, Wood, Hut, Pickup Truck, Roller Skate, Knot, Coin, Boomerang, Screwdriver,
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Some polar bears in far north are getting short-term benefit from thinning ice — ScienceDaily

A small subpopulation of polar bears lives on what used to be thick, multiyear sea ice far above the Arctic Circle. The roughly 300 to 350 bears in Kane Basin, a frigid channel between Canada’s Ellesmere Island and Greenland, make up about 1-2% of the world’s polar bears.

New research shows that Kane Basin polar bears are doing better, on average, in recent years than they were in the 1990s. The study, published Sept. 23 in Global Change Biology, finds the bears are healthier as conditions are warming because thinning and shrinking multiyear sea ice is allowing more sunlight to reach the ocean surface, which makes the system more ecologically productive.

“We find that a small number of the world’s polar bears that live in multiyear ice regions are temporarily benefiting from climate change,” said lead author Kristin Laidre, a polar scientist at the University of Washington Applied Physics

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New types of aurora are upending our understanding of polar lights

  • Scientists, amateur aurora-hunters, and a NASA intern have discovered fascinating new types of aurora in recent years.
  • One new type of aurora revealed curls in Earth’s upper atmosphere, and another pointed to a strange magnetic crunch in space.
  • New observations of Jupiter’s aurorae have also raised questions about the nature of these lights.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The colorful lights that dance across polar skies create beautiful displays, but they also reveal mysteries about how planets, space, and the sun interact.

Though humans have been observing the aurora for centuries, scientists are still learning about how it works. Just this year, amateur aurora-hunters discovered a new type of aurora that could come from space particles heating Earth’s upper atmosphere. A NASA intern also revealed a new type of twisting aurora, which led scientists to a mysterious crunch in Earth’s magnetic field. 

The lights at Earth’s poles continue

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