Itronics’ Rock Kleen Technology Seen As Way U.S. Government Can Produce Key, Critical Minerals in the U.S.

RENO, Nev., Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Itronics Inc. (OTC: ITRO), which has invented the Rock Kleen silver/gold mine tailings processing technology that recovers silver, manganese, copper, nickel, potassium and other metals from silver mine tailings, said today its technology fits perfectly with a recent Executive Order issued by the President on how to avoid excessive reliance on Critical Minerals from Foreign Adversaries. Both Manganese and agricultural potassium are Critical Minerals. 

Among the points raised in the Executive Order, The Departments of Interior, Energy and the Environmental Protection Agency shall identify ways to use materials from mining sites for the recovery of critical minerals.

“Our Rock Kleen Technology is exactly what our Government needs to recover minerals critical to make airplanes, computers, cell phones, generate electricity and to produce electronic products,” said Itronics President Dr. John Whitney

The Executive Order states: “These minerals are indispensable to our country

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An international team of researchers developed a novel technique to produce precise, high-performing biometric sensors — ScienceDaily

Wearable sensors are evolving from watches and electrodes to bendable devices that provide far more precise biometric measurements and comfort for users. Now, an international team of researchers has taken the evolution one step further by printing sensors directly on human skin without the use of heat.

Led by Huanyu “Larry” Cheng, Dorothy Quiggle Career Development Professor in the Penn State Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, the team published their results in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

“In this article, we report a simple yet universally applicable fabrication technique with the use of a novel sintering aid layer to enable direct printing for on-body sensors,” said first author Ling Zhang, a researcher in the Harbin Institute of Technology in China and in Cheng’s laboratory.

Cheng and his colleagues previously developed flexible printed circuit boards for use in wearable sensors, but printing directly on skin has been hindered by

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Apple’s ‘iPhone City’ in China is reportedly working around the clock to produce the iPhone 12 as its expected launch draws near



a close up of a computer: Apple's iPhone 11 Crystal Cox/Business Insider


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Apple’s iPhone 11 Crystal Cox/Business Insider

  • Foxconn, Apple’s main iPhone assembler, has ramped up iPhone production at its factory in Zhengzhou, China ahead of the expected iPhone 12 launch next month.
  • The factory is working 24 hours per day, offering worker bonuses, and canceling holidays to focus on iPhone production, according to a report from the South China Morning Post.
  • Zhengzhou is often referred to “iPhone City” by locals because of the factory’s massive presence in the city.
  • Apple typically unveils its new iPhones in September, but the company is instead expected to reveal its latest lineup in October after facing delays because of the coronavirus pandemic. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Apple is reportedly ramping up production of the iPhone 12 ahead of its expected launch next month.

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The factory in Zhengzhou, China, operated by Foxconn, Apple’s main iPhone assembler,

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Inducing plasma in biomass could make biogas easier to produce — ScienceDaily

Producing biogas from the bacterial breakdown of biomass presents options for a greener energy future, but the complex composition of biomass comes with a long list of challenges.

Cellulose and woody lignocellulose in biomass are especially hard for bacteria to digest, making the process inefficient. Chemical, physical, or mechanical processes, or several of them combined, can be used for pretreatment to make biomass easier to digest, but many of the current solutions are expensive or inefficient or rely on corrosive chemicals.

In research supported by the European Regional Development Fund, published in AIP Advances, by AIP Publishing, researchers at the Leibniz Institute of Plasma Science and Technology are testing plasma formation in biomass and finding a promising method for pretreatment of biomass.

“The plasma can be seen as a reactive gas, which contains populations of particles that contain several electron volts of kinetic energy. This energy can be used

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