Adorable moment Stanford professor was woken up by Nobel Prize win captured on camera

Photo of Katie Dowd

In this Monday, Oct. 12, 2020 photo provided by Stanford University, Robert Wilson, left, and Paul Milgrom wear masks as they stand for a photo in Stanford, Calif. The two American economists, both professors at Stanford, won the Nobel Prize in Economics for improving how auctions work. That research that underlies much of today's economy - from the way Google sells advertising to the way telecoms companies acquire airwaves from the government.

In this Monday, Oct. 12, 2020 photo provided by Stanford University, Robert Wilson, left, and Paul Milgrom wear masks as they stand for a photo in Stanford, Calif. The two American economists, both professors at Stanford, won the Nobel Prize in Economics for improving how auctions work. That research that underlies much of today’s economy — from the way Google sells advertising to the way telecoms companies acquire airwaves from the government.

Andrew Brodhead/Associated Press

When people are urgently calling and knocking on your door at 2 a.m., that’s rarely good news. But luckily for Stanford professor Paul Milgrom, Monday was the happiest early-morning disturbance of his life.

The Nobel Prize committee informs winners during work-day hours in Sweden, which means American recipients get calls in the wee small hours. So when the 2020 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences went to

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UC Berkeley professor, French scientist win Nobel Prize in chemistry for work on gene editing

Emmanuelle Charpentier, left, and Jennifer A. Doudna, who together won the Nobel Prize in chemistry Wednesday for their work on the CRISPR gene-editing tool. <span class="copyright">(Susan Walsh/ Associated Press)</span>
Emmanuelle Charpentier, left, and Jennifer A. Doudna, who together won the Nobel Prize in chemistry Wednesday for their work on the CRISPR gene-editing tool. (Susan Walsh/ Associated Press)

The Nobel Prize in chemistry was awarded Wednesday to UC Berkeley biochemist Jennifer A. Doudna and French scientist Emmanuelle Charpentier for their pioneering work on the so-called CRISPR tool for gene editing, a discovery that holds out the possibility of curing genetic diseases.

The Nobel Committee said the two women’s work on developing the CRISPR method of gene editing, likened to an elegant pair of “molecular scissors,” had transformed the life sciences by allowing scientists to target specific sequences on the human genome.

This could, for example, allow doctors to fix cells with sickle-cell anemia. It also paves the way for such developments as plants and livestock with greater disease resistance and safer transplants of animal organs into humans.

“There is enormous

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Professor uses 21st century technology to teach the classics amid pandemic

For more than five decades, Professor Emeritus Charles Krohn has nourished the soul of his students, teaching the classics at the University of St. Thomas in Houston — and he wasn’t about to let the coronavirus get in the way.

“They couldn’t run me off, so I just stayed around when the pandemic hit,” said Krohn.

But that’s meant embracing technology and a whole new way of teaching — at the age of 91.

When asked if his students are helping him, Krohn responded, “Oh, yes, definitely. Yeah, especially if something technical as well. ‘Well, Professor Krohn, why don’t you try doing this?'”

He currently teaches five days a week and often relies on his theater background to engage his students. 

“It makes for more communication because you’re aware of the audience, as I’ve now made, and in a way more aware of the students in this online contact,” said

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How do Americans view the virus? Anthropology professor examines attitudes, perceptions of COVID-19 — ScienceDaily

In her ongoing research about Americans’ responses to the COVID-19 pandemic, Northern Arizona University anthropology professor Lisa Hardy and her collaborators have talked to dozens of people. A couple of them stand out to the researchers.

Hardy spoke to a man who had polio as a child and had to live in a home with an iron lung away from his family. He said he was not in good health but he was not afraid of COVID-19 because he has seen all of this. A woman told anthropology lecturer Leah Mundell that she was the only Spanish-speaking contact tracer in her county, and she took on the responsibility of helping clients with much more than their physical health, connecting them with services and translating for them as they struggled to access resources.

Hardy’s research, to which Mundell contributed, was published this week in Medical Anthropology. “Connection, Contagion, and COVID-19”

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Sarasota native works with storied Penn State professor

opinion

HIGHER LEARNING

The best education demands a joint search for learning between exciting instructors and able students. That self-evident principle lies at the core of a New College education.   

Adherence to that principle explains why New College produces so many Fulbright and Goldwater scholars; why so many graduates go on to overachieve in careers in law, medicine, government, and the arts; and why, proportionately, more New College graduates subsequently receive doctorates in science than graduates of all but seven other institutions in the United States.   

So what does that principle look like on the ground?

New College of Florida president Donal O'Shea

To cite just one example from the class that graduated in May, consider Matt Mancini. A Sarasota native, Mancini is pursuing his doctorate at Penn State University on an endowed research assistantship that pays tuition, fees, living expenses and a stipend in the lab of storied

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Florida professor develops smartphone adapter to test for COVID-19



a screenshot of a cell phone on a table: Dinglasan’s team will receive $200,000 for their entry in the competition


© Provided by Knoxville WVLT-TV
Dinglasan’s team will receive $200,000 for their entry in the competition

GAINESVILLE, Tenn. (WVLT/WCJB) – A professor at the University of Florida is being honored for his part in creating a smartphone adapter that tests for COVID-19.

Rhoel Dinglasan, a Professor of Infectious Diseases at UF, along with two others, placed second in the National Institute of Health’s Technology Accelerator Challenge.

The CLIP-CAM was designed to test for Malaria and Anemia using saliva. The test was then modified to also test for COVID-19.

The adapter attaches to the iPhone and allows individuals to use a saliva sample to test for COVID-19. Results from the test return the same day.

“The idea is, more people can now use an app on your iPhone, with our adapter, with our test, and basically get tested within half an hour from the comfort of their own home,” said Dinglasen.

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UF professor earns national honors for Smartphone-base saliva test for COVID-19

Larry Savage
 
| The Gainesville Sun

A University of Florida professor earned national recognition for his smartphone-based, rapid saliva test he and his industry collaborators developed that can be used to diagnose COVID-19, along with malaria and anemia.

Rhoel Dinglasan, a professor of infectious diseases with UF’s College of Veterinary Medicine, and his team took second place in the National Institutes of Health’s Technology Accelerator Challenge.

The first-time competition encouraged design and development of innovative ways to assess two major vascular diseases, one of which had to include malaria, anemia or sickle cell disease. It also had to be low cost for consumers, accessible and use a mobile device or a portable attachment to the device.

Dinglasan, who is also director of the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention’s Southeastern Center of Excellence in Vector Borne Diseases, said he didn’t follow the contest rules completely only because at the time

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