Tardigrades survive deadly radiation by glowing in the dark

Tardigrade
This tardigrade uses fluorescence to resist lethal UV radiation

Harikumar R Suma & Sandeep M Eswarappa

A tiny tardigrade can survive intense ultraviolet radiation for an hour by glowing in the dark. “It acts like a shield,” says Sandeep Eswarappa at the Indian Institute of Science in Bangalore.

Tardigrades, also known as water bears, are animals around 1 millimetre long. They are famous for being able to withstand extreme conditions that would kill most organisms, such as being completely dried out.

Studying moss at their institute’s campus, Eswarappa and his colleagues found what may be a new species of tardigrade, though they don’t yet have enough information to formally describe it. For now, they are calling it Paramacrobiotus BLR, short for Bangalore.

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“We found this particular tardigrade in many places, especially in places that are well lit with sunlight,” says Eswarappa. The researchers

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New technology allows cancer patients to watch movies during radiation

AURORA, Colo. (KDVR) — No matter the age, radiation treatment can be tough on any cancer patient. Which is why UCHealth helped develop a special piece of technology to help reduce anxiety and stress associated with it.

The technology is called ‘RadFlix’ and it allows patients to safely watch their favorite TV shows and movies all while undergoing radiation.

“This can be a very traumatic experience for these kids,” said Dr. Douglas Holt, the Chief Resident radiation oncologist with the University of Colorado Cancer Center.

Holt helped develop the device. It’s a radiation compatible, video distraction system that can be used with any type of radiation treatment.

“That’s important because it’s very technically challenging to do that in radiation,” Holt said.

Not only is it convenient for a patient to watch TV or a movie on ‘RadFlix’ while undergoing radiation therapy, but it also helps them cut down on the

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Better detection of microwave radiation will improve thermal imaging, electronic warfare, radio communications — ScienceDaily

Army-funded research developed a new microwave radiation sensor with 100,000 times higher sensitivity than currently available commercial sensors. Researchers said better detection of microwave radiation will enable improved thermal imaging, electronic warfare, radio communications and radar.

Researchers published their study in the peer-reviewed journal Nature. The team includes scientists from Harvard University, The Institute of Photonic Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Pohang University of Science and Technology, and Raytheon BBN Technologies. The Army, in part, funded the work to fabricate this bolometer by exploiting the giant thermal response of graphene to microwave radiation.

“The microwave bolometer developed under this project is so sensitive that it is capable of detecting a single microwave photon, which is the smallest amount of energy in nature,” said Dr. Joe Qiu, program manager for solid-state electronics and electromagnetics, Army Research Office, an element of the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command’s Army Research Laboratory.

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High radiation on moon means lunar bases should be buried for safety

  • NASA recently unveiled the plan for its Artemis program, a series of missions that would return astronauts to the moon. 
  • A new study reveals how much radiation astronauts are exposed to on the lunar surface: a daily dose about 200 times greater than on Earth.
  • NASA wants to build a base on the moon, but the new data suggests it’d be safest to bury such a base under 2.5 feet of moon dirt to protect astronauts from radiation. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

NASA wants to build a permanent base on the moon by the 2030s — a place astronauts could stay for extended visits at the lunar south pole.

But according to a new study, any astronauts who go there would face levels of radiation nearly three times higher than what the astronauts on the space station deal with. In high enough doses, long-term exposure to this

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AS&E Announces the Acquisition of Radiation Detection Solutions Business

BILLERICA, Mass.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Sep 29, 2020–

American Science & Engineering, Inc. (“AS&E”), a subsidiary of OSI Systems, Inc., today announced that it has acquired substantially all of the assets of Nucsafe, Inc., a leading developer of technologies in radiation monitoring and nuclear materials detection using, among other methods, gamma ray and neutron detection, as well as backscatter X-ray. Leading government agencies and industry rely on Nucsafe’s products and services for safety, security and non-destructive testing applications.

In acquiring Nucsafe, AS&E acquires a leading portfolio of radiation monitoring and nuclear detection technologies, Nucsafe’s management and development team headquartered in Oak Ridge, TN, and Nucsafe’s patent portfolio, which includes U.S. Patent 8,300,763, “Spatial Sequenced Backscatter Portal”, an important patent relating to the inspection of vehicles and other objects. The terms of the transaction were not disclosed.

About OSI Systems, Inc.

OSI Systems is a vertically integrated designer and manufacturer of specialized electronic systems

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Moonwalking Humans Get Blasted With 200 Times the Radiation Experienced on Earth | Smart News

The 12 human beings who have walked on the moon were all bombarded by radiation roughly 200 times what we experience here on Earth, reports Adam Mann for Science. That’s two to three times what astronauts experience aboard the International Space Station, explains Marcia Dunn for the Associated Press (AP), suggesting that any long term human presence on the moon will require shelters with thick walls capable of blocking the radiation.

Despite the fact that the measurements, which come courtesy of China’s Chang’e-4 lunar lander, are quite high compared to what we experience on Earth, the data is quite useful for protecting future moonwalkers. According to Science, the levels of radiation at the lunar surface wouldn’t be expected to increase the risk of NASA astronauts developing cancer by more than 3 percent—a risk threshold the agency is legally required to keep its astronauts’ activities safely below.

“This is

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Kromek Launches the D3 PRD High-Accuracy Personal Radiation Detector

All-in-one gamma device helps security forces detect radioactive sources at twice the speed, from twice as far and with greater sensitivity to protect against nuclear threats

Kromek Group plc (“Kromek” or the “Group”) (AIM: KMK), a worldwide supplier of detection technology focusing on the medical, security screening and nuclear markets, is pleased to announce the launch of the D3 PRD, the new all-in-one, high-accuracy personal radiation detector (“PRD”) for first responders, armed forces, border security and CBRNE experts.

The D3 PRD continuously monitors gamma radiation levels, equipping security forces to protect against the threat of nuclear terrorism and the illicit movement of nuclear materials. Built to meet the requirements of the PRD market, it expands Kromek’s existing range of wearable radiation detectors. The D3 PRD is an all-in-one device, with replaceable batteries and which fits into a conventional use model of PRDs. It measures and notifies users of gamma dose

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First measurements of radiation levels on the moon — ScienceDaily

In the coming years and decades, various nations want to explore the moon, and plan to send astronauts there again for this purpose. But on our inhospitable satellite, space radiation poses a significant risk. The Apollo astronauts carried so-called dosimeters with them, which performed rudimentary measurements of the total radiation exposure during their entire expedition to the moon and back again. In the current issue (25 September) of the journal Science Advances, Chinese and German scientists report for the first time on time-resolved measurements of the radiation on the moon.

The “Lunar Lander Neutron and Dosimetry” (LND) was developed and built at Kiel University, on behalf of the Space Administration at the German Aerospace Center (DLR), with funding from the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi). The measurements taken by the LND allow the calculation of the so-called equivalent dose. This is important to estimate the biological

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Radiation levels on moon more than double those on space station

Sept. 25 (UPI) — Radiation levels on the surface of the moon are 2.6 times greater than those measured on the International Space Station, according to a new study.

NASA intends to put the first woman on the moon by 2024 — and the first man since 1972. Earlier this week, the space agency released new details about its Artemis program, including its decision to target a landing spot on the lunar South Pole near Shackleton Crater.

Regardless of where NASA’s lunar landers touch down, Artemis astronauts will need to protect themselves from increased radiation levels.

Using the Lunar Lander Neutron and Dosimetry, or LND, scientists were able to, for the first time, measure radiation levels on the lunar surface.

Scientists shared the first-of-their-kind measurements in a new paper, published Friday in the journal Science Advances.

“The radiation exposure we have measured is a good benchmark for the radiation within

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New measurements show moon has hazardous radiation levels

Updated

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