Greenland Is Melting at Some of the Fastest Rates in 12,000 Years

The vast Greenland ice sheet is melting at some of its fastest rates in the past 12,000 years. And it could quadruple over the next 80 years if greenhouse gas emissions don’t decline dramatically in the coming decades.

Research published yesterday in the journal Nature warns that the ice sheet’s future losses depend heavily on how quickly humans cut carbon emissions today.

Led by Jason Briner of the University at Buffalo, State University of New York, the study is among the first to compare the possible future of the ice sheet with its ancient past.

“Now we’re really able to put into perspective just how anomalous our current change is and future changes might be,” said Josh Cuzzone, a co-author of the study and a scientist at the University of California, Irvine.

The researchers used models, informed by data from ancient ice samples drilled out from the ice sheet, to

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TikTok Users in UK, Germany, France, Italy, Norway: Ages, Screentime, Open Rates

    

Photographer: Brent Lewin/Bloomberg

One in four Britons use TikTok every month, with 17 million regulars spending just over an hour a day on the app, signaling the upstart social network has built a local following almost half as large as Facebook Inc.’s in just three years. 

The data, seen by Bloomberg and contained within a presentation this summer from TikTok’s marketing solutions arm, TikTok for Business, shows that among that group four in 10 are between the ages of 18 and 24 as monthly active users, so-called MAUs. The average Brit uses the app for 66 minutes a day and opens TikTok 13 times in 24 hours. 

In comparison, marketing and research firms We Are Social and Hootsuite estimate Facebook has 37 million users in the U.K.

TikTok has grown prodigiously as more people seek entertainment during lockdowns triggered by the coronavirus. A similar presentation distributed in

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New data on US infection rates helps identify COVID-19 turning points — ScienceDaily

Mathematicians have developed a framework to determine when regions enter and exit COVID-19 infection surge periods, providing a useful tool for public health policymakers to help manage the coronavirus pandemic.

The first published paper on second-surge COVID-19 infections from US states suggests that policymakers should look for demonstrable turning points in data rather than stable or insufficiently declining infection rates before lifting restrictions.

Mathematicians Nick James and Max Menzies have published what they believe is the first analysis of COVID-19 infection rates in US states to identify turning points in data that indicate when surges have started or ended.

The new study by the Australian mathematicians is published today in the journal Chaos, published by the American Institute of Physics.

“In some of the worst performing states, it seems that policymakers have looked for plateauing or slightly declining infection rates. Instead, health officials should look for identifiable local maxima

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Konami rates classic games like Metal Gear, Castlevania, and Contra for PC

In a new report from Gematsu, the Taiwan Digital Game Rating Committee has reportedly rated a selection of classic Konami games for PC, which could indicate an imminent relaunch for these games on PC on official platforms. Eight games in total were rated for PC, five of which are in a collection, spanning a fifteen year period starting all the way back in 1987 and ending in 2002. The games that were rated include:

  • Metal Gear
  • Metal Gear Solid
  • Metal Gear Solid 2: Substance
  • Konami Collector’s Series: Castlevania and Contra, which includes
    • Castlevania
    • Castlevania 2: Simon’s Quest
    • Castlevania 3: Dracula’s Curse
    • Contra
    • Super C

It’s not clear if these are HD remasters that are intended for release on all modern gaming platforms, or if Konami is simply porting the original games to PC (which would be a slightly baffling move). Either way, it’s likely that we’ll be seeing these games

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COVID-19 mortality rates higher among men than women — ScienceDaily

A new review article from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) shows people who are biologically male are dying from COVID-19 at a higher rate than people who are biologically female. In a review published in Frontiers in Immunology, researcher-clinicians at BIDMC explore the sex-based physiological differences that may affect risk and susceptibility to COVID-19, the course and clinical outcomes of the disease and response to vaccines.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed a striking gender bias with increased mortality rates in men compared with women across the lifespan,” said corresponding author Vaishali R. Moulton, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of medicine in the Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology at BIDMC. “Apart from behavioral and lifestyle factors that differ between men and women, sex chromosome-linked genes, sex hormones and the microbiome control aspects of the immune responses to infection and are potentially important biological contributors to the sex-based differences

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It’s Mostly About Rates for Growth-Deprived Emerging Markets

(Bloomberg) — Emerging markets are poised to enjoy a fresh tailwind at an auspicious moment.

President Donald Trump’s weekend approval of Oracle Corp.’s bid for the American operations of TikTok — a move that may take some of the heat out of Washington’s standoff with Beijing — looks poised to give markets a lift as the new week gets underway, extending last week’s gains in developing-nation assets.

Record low interest rates, rising commodity prices and improved mobility data are buoying expectations of a recovery in the world’s developing economies even as investors cast a wary eye toward the U.S. presidential election in November. Yet for all those plus points — and any small boost provided by a gentler geopolitical backdrop — it’s rate differentials that are sustaining much of the investor demand. Bond funds extended their longest streak of inflows since a 12-week run in the fourth quarter of 2017,

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Stocks fall as tech slides, Fed projects years of low rates, Snowflake doubles in IPO

S&P 500, Nasdaq finish in the red

The major indexes could not shake off the struggles of large tech stocks and drifted lower in the final hour of trading. The S&P 500 and Nasdaq Composite lost 0.5% and 1.3%, respectively. The Dow, at one time up more than 350 points, notched just a 38 point gain. — Jesse Pound

Powell wraps up

Fed chair Jerome Powell concluded his press conference shortly after 3:30 p.m. With less than half an hour remaining in Wednesday’s session, the Dow was up 125 points, while the S&P 500 and Nasdaq Composite had fallen 0.1% and 0.9%, respectively. — Jesse Pound

Tech struggles drag down market

Continued struggles for major tech stocks weighed on the overall market and erased some of its recent gains.

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