Are Deepfakes Dangerous? Creators and Regulators Disagree

Over the past few years, deepfakes have emerged as the internet’s latest go-to for memes and parody content.

It’s easy to see why: They enable creators to bend the rules of reality like no other technology before. Through the magic of deepfakes, you can watch Jennifer Lawrence deliver a speech through the face of Steve Buscemi, see what Ryan Reynolds would’ve looked like as Willy Wonka, and even catch Hitler and Stalin singing Video Killed The Radio Star in a duet.

For the uninitiated, deepfake tech is a form of synthetic media that allows users to superimpose a different face on someone else’s in a way that’s nearly indistinguishable from the original. It does so by reading heaps of data to understand the face’s contours and other characteristics to naturally blend and animate it into the scene.

Ryan Reynolds as Willy Wonka Deepfake from NextFace
NextFace/Youtube

At this point, you’ve probably come across such clips on platforms like

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Regulators Eyeing Tech To Boost Financial Stability

Regulators around the globe are eyeing tech to boost financial stability

Enhanced supervisory technology (SupTech) with strong governance and skilled human oversight could well have important benefits for financial regulators around the in efforts to increase economic stability in their nations and around the globe, said a report prepared for the G20.

“SupTech could improve oversight, surveillance and analytical capabilities, and generate real time indicators of risk to support forward looking, judgement based, supervision and policymaking,” regulators told the Financial Stability Board.

Importantly as well, real-time and non-traditional data may allow authorities to be more pro-active in their supervision, FSB said.

As an example of the efficiencies SupTech can provide financial regulation, the authors of the report pointed out the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has found

algorithms are five times better than random testing at identifying language in investment adviser regulatory filings that could merit further investigation for potential

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Facebook’s latest integrations with Instagram could make it harder for regulators to break up the company

Today, let’s talk about a couple little things that could turn into a big thing.

In January 2019, Mike Isaac reported a noteworthy development about Facebook at the New York Times. In the months to come, he said, Facebook would unify the technical infrastructure powering Facebook, Instagram, and WhatsApp. To the user, these changes would be invisible. But to Facebook itself, there were clear strategic imperatives to merge the apps. Among them: the move came just as the US government was beginning to consider an effort to break the company up.

In the nearly two years since, the government’s effort has accelerated. On September 15th, the Wall Street Journal reported that an antitrust case against the company could come by the end of the year. But Facebook’s effort to puree its family of apps into a single software smoothie on the back end has picked up as well. And

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Colorado regulators leaning toward enacting what could be the country’s biggest setbacks from oil, gas wells

A state commission has given preliminary approval to what could be the largest statewide setbacks for oil and gas wells in the country.

The Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission voted Monday for 2,000-foot setbacks. A final vote on that rule and many others is expected in early November.

The COGCC said it believes the 2,000 feet of space that would be required between homes, schools and oil and gas wells would be the largest in the country.

However, the requirement comes with exceptions that could in practice result in shorter setbacks in certain cases, including when topography or technology can provide comparable protections at a shorter distance.

The setbacks and a first-of-its-kind emissions-monitoring rules for wells approved Sept. 23 by the Colorado Air Quality Control Commission are part of the implementation of Senate Bill 181. Both panels have been holding public hearings, meeting with interest groups and writing rules

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