Research review determines aerosol-generating procedures that require enhanced personal protective equipment — ScienceDaily

Autopsy, airway suctioning and cardiopulmonary resuscitation are among the list of medical procedures that pose a risk of spreading COVID-19 from a patient to their health-care provider by creating aerosols, according to new research published in the journal BMJ Open Respiratory Research by an international team of experts including occupational health, preventive medicine and infectious disease specialists.

The team, led by University of Alberta medicine professor Sebastian Straube, carried out a systematic review of public health guidelines, research papers and policy documents from around the globe to determine which procedures are classified as aerosol-generating.

“What we sought to do was to understand which procedures generate aerosols and therefore require a higher grade of personal protective equipment,” said Straube, who also heads the preventive medicine division of the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry.

“Where there is 80 per cent agreement from a number of different source documents, we are reasonably confident

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Finding Martian Microbes Could Require Digging Miles Underground

NASA’s Perseverance rover is flying to Mars as you read this sentence. It will land there in February 2021 and set aside rocks with promising signs of ancient life, for a future mission to pick up for analysis.

But what about current life on Mars? Are microbes embedded in the ice caps? Perhaps they are sheltering in water runoff in some crater? Or, as some scientists suggest, is life buried miles underground — a difficult spot for us to search, at best?

A new study is trying to figure out ways to hunt for life on worlds that have little or no running water at the surface. One easy answer, in theory, is to look to water reserves underground — and we are pretty sure Mars

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New Version of Microsoft Office Coming Next Year That Won’t Require a Subscription

Microsoft will next year offer a new perpetual release of Microsoft Office for Mac and Windows that doesn’t require a subscription to use, according to the software giant (via Windows Central).


“Microsoft Office will also see a new perpetual release for both Windows and Mac, in the second half of 2021,” said Microsoft in a blog post announcing the next version of its Exchange server, confirming that a new version of Office available as a one-time payment purchase is coming next year.

In recent years, the company has pushed its subscription-based Microsoft 365 (formerly Office 365) bundle as a way to get access to its productivity suite, which includes Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook, as well as servers such as Exchange, SharePoint, and Skype for Business.

Some of these apps can be used free online with a Microsoft account, but users can’t install them on their computer, like they’d

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Realizing the tremendous potential of biological collections will require strategy, action and investment

biodiversity
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

A new report on biological collections from The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine points to the need for sustainability, digitization, recruitment of a diverse workforce, and infrastructure upgrades to meet the challenges now facing science and society. The report, “Biological Collections: Ensuring Critical Research and Education for the 21st Century,” says these collections are a critical part of the nation’s science and innovation infrastructure and a fundamental resource for understanding the natural world.


“This report, two years in the making, demonstrates the diverse benefits for science and society of building robust biodiversity infrastructure,” said Joseph Cook, member of the report committee and Regents Professor of Biology and Curator of Mammals of the Museum of Southwestern Biology at The University of New Mexico.

“Many biological collections are at a critical juncture,” said James Collins, co-chair of the committee that wrote the report and Ullman Professor

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