Creating Resilience In Oil And Gas Supply Chains With Technology

The Covid-19 pandemic has everyone rethinking what steps to take for resilience today, and how to safeguard that resilience for an uncertain energy future. Nearly every oil and gas executive said, in the just released EY Oil and Gas Digital Transformation and the Workforce Survey, that their company will have to change how it operates coming out of the downturn. What’s implied by that result is that oil and gas executives don’t expect the market to ever go back to where it was.

They are right. Oil demand is unlikely to return to the path it was on before the pandemic. New ways of living, working and operating our day-to-day lives have taken hold and are likely to permanently transform traditional choices. When we get to

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The Important Difference Between Cybersecurity And Cyber Resilience (And Why You Need Both)

Cyber threats like hacking, phishing, ransomware, and distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks have the potential to cause enormous problems for organizations. Not only can companies suffer serious service disruption and reputational damage, but the loss of personal data can also result in huge fines from regulators.

Take British Airways as an example. In 2019, the airline was fined more than £183m by the UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) after customer data was compromised in a cyber-attack. Customer details, including name, address, logins, and payment card, were harvested by hackers – affecting half a million customers in total. The fine, which amounts to around 1.5% of British Airways’ global 2018 turnover, was the first proposed by the ICO under the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

Cyberattacks like this are hitting the headlines with increasing frequency. But

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Why hope is a better way to cope than resilience during the pandemic

  • Hope might be a more effective coping strategy than resilience, especially during a unique crisis like the pandemic.
  • Katy Dineen, an assistant lecturer in moral responsibility and researcher in the philosophy of education, believes hope is a better mechanism for setting goals and achieving them during uncertainty. 
  • Some experts promote resilience, grit, and the ability to bounce back as highly desirable traits, but Dineen argues these same traits could potentially deepen mental health problems. 
  • She says prioritizing hope over resilience can help you to set realistic, actionable goals for getting through tough times.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The word “resilience” has been used frequently throughout the coronavirus pandemic. Medics, business leaders, and teachers have all been encouraged to build resilience in order to address the needs of their communities.

However, advocating resilience in the current context may not be the best way forward. Another option is hope.

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Building Resilience During Times of Crisis: What to Expect from CDW’s Tech Talk

In this year like no other, businesses around the world have come to look differently at the nature of risk.

The pandemic has required organizations to think in new ways about cybersecurity, for example. Those operating within a traditional perimeter-based security model have been vexed by remote work environments, where the perimeter has been replaced by every employee’s home.

The VPNs that enable employees to securely access corporate networks have been stretched to their limits, creating some painful work-from-home arrangements. And those employees working remotely have been subject to a range of new security risks, from additional phishing attempts to unsecured home Wi-Fi.

If anything has become clear over the past few months, it is that every organization is subject to unforeseen forces that threaten to derail hard work and the best of intentions. The businesses that have fared the best this year are those that were prepared for anything.

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TIE 2020 Shows a Path to a Smarter Future Forged by Taiwan’s Resilience

TAIPEI, Taiwan, Oct. 3, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The impacts of the recent COVID-19 pandemic on global trade and our daily lives have led to an acceleration of technological innovations in different sectors. At the same time, our society is transitioning from the era of Big Data towards Hyper Digitization. To help industries prepare for these trends and navigate the post-pandemic world, this year’s Taiwan Innotech Expo (TIE 2020) was highlighting the latest smart living technologies that can spark new imaginations. Since its transformation into a global trade show, the TIE continues to draw international attention to Taiwan’s strength in R&D and innovation. This year’s event showcases how Taiwan stays resilient in face of a global crisis.

The TIE has been demonstrating the R&D strength of Taiwan’s private enterprises, government agencies, academic institutions, and research entities.
The TIE has been demonstrating the R&D strength of Taiwan’s private enterprises, government agencies, academic institutions, and research entities.

Blueprints for a better world can be found in the three thematic pavilions

Scheduled

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Four ways sustainability can increase resilience – Sponsor Content

On the latest episode of #BLKBottomLine, Debbie McCoy, BlackRock Systematic Head of Sustainable Investing, highlights why sustainability can accelerate economic recovery.

There are four key areas for increased resilience: systems, policies, companies and innovation.

First, there is heightened focus around climate change. But the broader societal system has come into question as well, particularly around inequality. Climate change and inequality remain salient conversations as we think about how to strengthen for the future.

In this very unusual moment of COVID-19, there is unprecedented policy action taking place. There is opportunity in Europe as new policies are formed, particularly around energy, and in the U.S. and all over the world, there is increased public-private partnership.

Another key area is the resilience of companies through this period of change. Companies are no longer responsible just to themselves, but also to the communities in which they operate.

Lastly, despite processes being upended

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U.S. commercial aircraft Resilience makes history with Halloween launch

The first commercially owned U.S. rocket is going to launch into space this Halloween, by way of NASA and Space X.

NASA’s SpaceX Crew-1 flight mission, scheduled to launch on October 31, will carry NASA astronauts Michael Hopkins, Victor Glover, and Shannon Walker, as well as Soichi Noguchi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, to the space station from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, according to a press release.

MORE ASTRONOMY, PLEASE: SpaceX plans to build luxury spaceport resort in a tiny Texas town

The group will be the first international team to fly a NASA-certified capsule owned and operated by an American company. It will also be the first time an international crew member has flown on a commercial spacecraft from U.S. soil. It will be SpaceX’s second launch.

Michael Hopkins, commander of the Crew Dragon Spacecraft, was excited about the launch in a press conference held yesterday,

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