Comcast Offers Thousands of Grants, Equipment, Marketing and Technology Resources to Small Businesses Hardest Hit by COVID-19

Comcast RISE Initiative Provides Small Businesses with Free Marketing Insights and Opportunities to Apply for Media, Technology Upgrades and Grants Up To $10,000

Black-Owned Small Businesses, Those Impacted Most by the Pandemic, are the First Eligible Applicants for Comcast RISE Resources and Grants.

Comcast Corporation (NASDAQ: CMCSA) today launched Comcast RISE, an initiative created to help strengthen and empower small businesses hard hit by COVID-19. The Comcast RISE program will help thousands of small businesses over the next three years. The multi-faceted program offers grants, marketing and technology upgrades, including media campaigns and connectivity, computer and voice equipment, as well as free marketing insights to all applicants.

U.S. small businesses have been particularly hard hit by the pandemic. A recent study from the National Bureau of Economic Research found that the number of U.S. active business owners dropped from 15 million to 11.7 million from February to April. The study

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Data tool helps users manage water resources, protect infrastructure — ScienceDaily

River systems are essential resources for everything from drinking water supply to power generation — but these systems are also hydrologically complex, and it is not always clear how water flow data from various monitoring points relates to any specific piece of infrastructure. Researchers from Cornell University and North Carolina State University have now developed a tool that draws from multiple databases to give water resource managers and infrastructure users the information they need to make informed decisions about water use on river networks.

“A streamgage tells you what the water level is at a specific point in the river — but that’s not really enough information,” says Sankar Arumugam, co-author of a paper on the work and a professor of civil engineering at NC State. “If you are an infrastructure operator, what you really need to know is how long it will take for that water-level information to be

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Noble metal clusters can enhance performance of catalysts and save resources: Lower-cost production thanks to optimized distribution of atoms – publication in Nature Catalysis –

Billions of noble metal catalysts are used worldwide for the production of chemicals, energy generation, or cleaning the air. However, the resources required for this purpose are expensive and their availability is limited. To optimize the use of resources, catalysts based on single metal atoms have been developed. A research team of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) demonstrated that noble metal atoms may assemble to form clusters under certain conditions. These clusters are more reactive than the single atoms and, hence, exhaust gases can be much better removed. The results are reported in Nature Catalysis.

Noble metal catalysts are used for a wide range of reactions. Among others, they are applied in nearly all combustion processes to reduce pollutant emissions. Often, they consist of very small particles of the active component, such as a noble metal, which are applied to a carrier material. These so-called nanoparticles are composed of

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New technology will cut time and resources for Outer Banks search rescue crews

OUTER BANKS, N.C. (WAVY) — Search and rescue crews on the Outer Banks are hoping a new piece of technology will help cut down on time and resources when emergencies happen.

It’s called AquaEye, a handheld side scan sonar.

“This actually looks underwater and tells us what’s there as far as hard surfaces or soft surfaces such as a human being,” said Mirek Dabrowski, the director of Surf Rescue.

For 21 years, Dabrowski has worked for Surf Rescue, which provides water rescue for multiple municipalities including the town of Duck, Southern Shores and Dare County, as well as Cape Hatteras National Seashore.

He enjoys his job because of the people he works with, as well as being able to help people, which AquaEye will continue to help them achieve.

“We’re not interested in making a lot of searches. Once you get them out and make sure they’re safe, you go

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002998.CN | Elite Color Environmental Resources Science & Technology Co. Ltd. A Company Profile & Executives

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Marine bacteria shift between lifestyles to get the best resources — ScienceDaily

To stay, or not to stay? When it comes to nutrient resource patches, researchers from Japan and Switzerland have discovered that marine bacteria have a knack for exploiting them efficiently, timing movements between patches to get the best resources.

In a study published this month in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, U.S.A., researchers from the University of Tsukuba and ETH Zurich have revealed that marine bacteria optimize nutrient uptake by switching between dispersal and resource exploitation.

Heterotrophic bacteria (i.e., those that cannot produce their own food, instead obtaining nutrition from other sources of organic carbon, such as plant or animal matter) are the main recyclers of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the ocean. Hotspots of DOM that are made up of particles, such as marine snow, are important to the global carbon cycle.

“Some groups of heterotrophic bacteria take advantage of these hotspots,” says one of the

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