Experiential Museums Find New Ways to Sell Fun Even With Covid Restrictions

Experiential museums—designed to provide visitors with interactive experiences—faced a big problem as coronavirus restrictions were eased: How to boost sanitization measures while demonstrating to visitors that these high-touch spaces were still safe to enter and enjoy.

Many operators of such spaces say they have been able to retain their interactive, immersive identities to a surprising degree as they and their guests navigate the challenges of the coronavirus pandemic.

The masks now required for visitors six years old and up might have made it harder to pick up the scents of the Chromaroma exhibit, for example, at the Houston outpost of the Color Factory, an art exhibit dedicated to color. So the museum amplified the scents.

The Color Factory has introduced social distancing rules in the space.



Photo:

Color Factory LLC

The Color Factory’s ball pits in Houston and New York now require everyone over a certain age to wear a

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Trump further targets tech-friendly work visa programs in latest immigration restrictions

The Trump administration on Tuesday outlined new rules tightening restrictions placed on guest worker visa programs, including the H-1B program favored by tech industry firms.



a man wearing a suit and tie


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The rules tighten eligibility around foreign workers, so employers must meet more stringent criteria around the jobs they’re hiring for and how much they’re paying. That may make it harder for companies to receive H-1B visas as part of the annual lottery that awards 60,000 slots to foreign workers, not including renewals. The new rules follow a June order from President Donald Trump suspending a range of guest worker visa programs through the end of the year, with the White House citing domestic job losses during the COVID-19 pandemic as the motivator.

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The tech and IT industries that rely on foreign talent now face more hiring restrictions

The Trump administration says the goal is to ensure companies

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Data center spending to grow 6% in 2021 as enterprises rebound from cash flow restrictions

Data center infrastructure spending is expected to grow 6% globally next year as businesses rebound from cash flow restrictions brought on by the coronavirus pandemic, according to Gartner. 

The research firm released its latest data center infrastructure forecast Wednesday, projecting that end-user spending on global data center infrastructure products will reach $200 billion in 2021. 

Spending has declined more than 10% so far in 2020, as lockdowns from COVID-19 prevented around 60% of new facilities construction. Nonetheless, Gartner is optimistic about growth over the next few years. The firm still expects the data center market to grow year-over-year through 2024.

“The priority for most companies in 2020 is keeping the lights on, so data center growth is generally being pushed back until the market enters the recovery period,” said Naveen Mishra , senior research director at Gartner. “Gartner expects larger enterprise data centers sites to hit pause temporarily and then

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SMIC has had ‘preliminary exchanges’ with U.S. over export restrictions

SHANGHAI (Reuters) – Chinese chipmaker Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation has undertaken “preliminary exchanges” with the U.S. Bureau of Industry and Security regarding export restrictions, the company said on Sunday in a filing.

FILE PHOTO: FILE PHOTO: A security officer stands outside a building of Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation (SMIC) during its grand opening in Shanghai November 22, 2001./File Photo

“The Company is conducting assessments on the relevant impact of such export restrictions on the company’s production and operation activities,” the filing to the Hong Kong Stock Exchange said.

SMIC also said it has been operating in compliance with the relevant laws and regulations of all jurisdictions where it performs its businesses.

The company also advised shareholders and potential investors “to exercise caution when dealing in the securities of the Company.”

In September, Reuters reported that the Bureau of Industry and Security under the Department of Commerce had issued letters informing

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Trade restrictions delay China hunt for Samsung and TSMC alternatives

  • The US Commerce Department issued export restrictions against SMIC.
  • These restrictions will set back China’s search for domestic alternatives to Samsung and TSMC and limit Chinese tech companies’ ability to compete in foreign markets.

The US Commerce Department issued an order requiring US companies to obtain a license to export products to SMIC, according to Reuters. The Department alleges that SMIC could be supplying components to China’s military; however, representatives of SMIC deny this, claiming that the company only manufactures semiconductors for civilian and commercial end-users. 

Huawei share of smartphone shipments by region

US export restrictions against SMIC will set back China’s search for domestic alternatives to Samsung and TSMC.

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The export restrictions will make it particularly difficult for SMIC to obtain foundry equipment, setting back China’s efforts to develop a domestic alternative to Samsung and TSMC. Samsung and TSMC currently operate the only foundries in the world capable of manufacturing 7nm chips. The

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SMIC’s Hong Kong shares tumble after U.S. tightens export restrictions

FILE PHOTO: Chinese and U.S. flags flutter near the Bund in Shanghai, China July 30, 2019. REUTERS/Aly Song/File Photo

HONG KONG (Reuters) – Hong Kong-listed shares of Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corp fell more than 7% on Monday after the United States imposed restrictions on exports to China’s biggest chip maker, citing a risk of military use.

SMIC’s shares fell as much as 7.9% to HK$17.12 ($2.21), the lowest since May 29, and were last down 6.7%.

The company said it had not received any official notice of the restrictions and added it has no ties with the Chinese military.

Suppliers of certain equipment to SMIC will now have to apply for individual export licenses, according to a letter from the U.S. Commerce Department dated Friday and seen by Reuters.

Earlier this year SMIC raised $6.6 billion in a secondary listing on Shanghai’s tech-centric STAR market.

The company said it intended

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China must prepare for ‘long tech march’ following U.S. restrictions on SMIC: Global Times

FILE PHOTO: Chinese and U.S. flags flutter near the Bund in Shanghai, China July 30, 2019. REUTERS/Aly Song/File Photo

SHANGHAI (Reuters) – China must engage in a new “long march” in the technology sector now that the U.S. has imposed export restrictions on Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corp, the country’s largest chip manufacturer, Chinese state-backed tabloid the Global Times wrote on Sunday.

The unnamed author of an op-ed in the paper here argues that the U.S’ dominance of the global semiconductor industry supply chain is a “fundamental threat” to China.

“It now appears that China will need to control all research and production chains of the semiconductor industry, and rid itself of being dependent on the U.S.,” the author wrote.

On Saturday, Reuters reported that the U.S. had sent letters to companies informing them that they must obtain a license to supply SMIC.

The letter stated that SMIC and its subsidiaries

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Trump Administration Whacks China Again With New Restrictions on Its Biggest Chip Maker

The Trump administration has another Chinese technology company on its radar: the Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation, the country’s biggest chip maker. And as you all can imagine if you’ve been following the recent news cycle, that is not good for SMIC.



a man wearing a suit and tie talking on a cell phone: Targeting China’s tech companies is now the norm.


© Photo: Thomas Peter-Pool (Getty Images)
Targeting China’s tech companies is now the norm.

On Friday, the U.S. Department of Commerce informed American companies in the chip industry of new restrictions on exports to SMIC, the Financial Times reported. Now, American companies must obtain licenses from the government in order to sell products, such as software and chip-making equipment, to SMIC.

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In a letter communicating the new restrictions to U.S. companies, the Commerce Department said that it had taken action because exports to SMIC posed an “unacceptable risk” of potentially being used for military purposes.

According to U.S. government sources quoted by the Times, the Pentagon made

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US sets restrictions on China’s biggest chipmaker, citing military fears

US wariness of Chinese tech firms was underlined again Friday, when the Commerce Department sent a letter to companies in the states reportedly telling them they must get a license before exporting certain goods to China’s largest chipmaker, because of concerns about military use of technology.



a traffic light hanging off the side of a building: The Beijing branch of Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation. Su Weizhong/Getty Images


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The Beijing branch of Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation. Su Weizhong/Getty Images

The Commerce Department said in the letter that exports to Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation “may pose an unacceptable risk of diversion to a military end use in the People’s Republic of China,” according to a Saturday report by The New York Times.

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Last year, the US placed restrictions on companies selling gear to Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei , over concerns about Huawei’s relationship with the Chinese government and fears that its equipment could be used to spy on other countries and companies.

And popular video app TikTok,

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US tightens trade restrictions on Chinese chipmaker SMIC

The US Commerce Department has added China’s largest chipmaker, Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation (SMIC), to its entity list, after it determined there an “unacceptable risk” that equipment SMIC received could be used for military purposes, Reuters reported.

The move blocks US computer chip companies from exporting technology to SMIC without an export license. SMIC is the latest major Chinese firm to be put on the entity list; the Trump administration added phone manufacturer Huawei to the list in 2019.

According to The Wall Street Journal, the Commerce Department wrote in a letter to the computer chip industry on Friday that exporting products to SMIC would “pose an unacceptable risk of diversion to a military end use in the People’s Republic of China.”

In April, the administration tightened export rules on shipping goods to China. It claims it’s seeking to keep US companies from selling products that could be used

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