Demonstrator masters flight sequences for reusable rocket stages

Demonstrator masters flight sequences for reusable rocket stages
The demonstrator technology vehicle (DTV) is a 60 kg platform with landing legs. It has been developed by INCAS, Romania’s National Institute for Aerospace Research in Bucharest. DTV’s turbo jet 0.9 kN-class engine provides the power to carry payloads totalling 20 kg. Tests at INCAS in July 2020 lasted ten seconds to a couple of minutes to demonstrate vertical takeoff, short hovering and landing manoeuvres – the technology building blocks for the recovery of a rocket stage. This project was carried out with the support of ESA’s Future Launchers Preparatory Programme. Credit: ESA

A crucial part of rocket reusability is a smooth return and landing. ESA has helped Romania’s National Institute for Aerospace Research, INCAS, to demonstrate vertical takeoff, short hovering and landing maneuvers using a small-scale flight demonstrator.


This 60 kg platform has landing legs and is powered by a turbo jet 0.9 kN-class engine. It is capable of

Read More

Watch Blue Origin launch its reusable New Shepard rocket live, with a key NASA system test on board

Blue Origin is set to return to active flight today, after a hiatus of nearly a year since its last launch in December 2019. Today’s launch is a mission for the company’s New Shepard reusable sub-orbital rocket – a record-setting sixth flight for this particular rocket, which first flew and landed back in December 2017. Today’s launch includes a system design to test elements of NASA’s Deorbit, Descent and Landing Sensor technology, which will provide key automation for use in future landers for the Moon and Mars that will be able to intelligently identify and avoid potential hazards on target landing zones.

This test will include recover of both the rocket and the capsule for the New Shepard launch vehicle. The Rocket will land back at the West Texas launch and landing site with a controlled, engine-powered descent, and the capsule will descend via parachute. The capsule will contain a

Read More

Inside Sierra Nevada Corp’s space plans, from the reusable ‘Dream Chaser’ to inflatable habitats

  • Private contractor Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC) invested heavily in its space systems division, especially as it sees NASA and other companies building infrastructure in orbit.
  • The crown jewel of SNC’s space portfolio is Dream Chaser: A reusable spacecraft that is built to launch atop a traditional rocket and land on a runway like an airplane.
  • “We view the Dream Chaser as something that eventually in low Earth orbit will be providing transportation, logistics and crew for everybody,” Steve Lindsey, SNC’s senior vice president of strategy space systems, told CNBC.



a satellite in space: An animation shows Dream Chaser and its Shooting Star cargo module in orbit around the Earth.


© Provided by CNBC
An animation shows Dream Chaser and its Shooting Star cargo module in orbit around the Earth.

Sierra Nevada Corporation is best known as a private aerospace and national security contractor – but the company is investing heavily in its space systems division, especially as it sees NASA and other companies building infrastructure in orbit.

Loading...

Load Error

“Our

Read More

Russian Design for a Reusable Rocket Sure Looks Familiar

Conceptual images of Russia’s upcoming Amur reusable rocket.

Conceptual images of Russia’s upcoming Amur reusable rocket.
Image: Roscosmos

Roscosmos is moving ahead with plans to build Russia’s first reusable rocket. Glancing at the design, it appears the Russian space agency doesn’t feel the need to reinvent the wheel, given the vehicle’s uncanny resemblance to the SpaceX Falcon 9.

Roscosmos signed a contract with the Progress Rocket Space Centre to sketch out a preliminary design for the Amur-SPG reusable rocket, reports Russian news agency TASS. The inaugural launch is planned for 2026, when the methane-powered rocket will take off from the Vostochny spaceport in eastern Russia. Roscomos is hoping for individual launch costs no greater than $22 million, with the total cost of developing the system at around $880 million.

As Ars Technica space reporter Eric Berger rightly pointed out in a recent tweet, the new design seems uncomfortably recognizable.

“Russia has clearly decided that if

Read More

Reusable Chinese Space Craft Lands Returns Earth

The Chinese government has announced the safe return of a reusable spacecraft, called Chongfu Shiyong Shiyan Hangtian Qi (CSSHQ), to Earth, after spending two days in orbit. 

The unmanned spacecraft was launched on Friday, September 4th, 2020, from the Jiuquan Satelite Launch Center in northwest China’s section of the Gobi Desert, before safely returning to its scheduled landing site. The spacecraft’s purpose was reportedly to test reusable technologies that will provide ‘technological support for the peaceful use of space’, although no information about what technologies were tested has been made public. 

Adding to this, no pictures nor information of the spacecraft itself have been released into the press either, although the Chinese government did say that it was launched via a Long March-2F carrier rocket. This makes CSSHQ the 14th mission for the rocket, also used by the Chinese to send astronauts into orbit, as well as its own space

Read More