Facebook reverses policy and bans Holocaust denial on its platforms

Facebook has announced a ban on content that denies or distorts the Holocaust. The policy marks a reversal on how to handle a disturbing category of posts that CEO Mark Zuckerberg once said should not be blocked on the platform even though they’re false. 

The company updated its hate speech policy to prohibit such content, Monika Bickert, VP of Content Policy at Facebook, said in a statement on Monday. 

“Our decision is supported by the well-documented rise in anti-Semitism globally and the alarming level of ignorance about the Holocaust, especially among young people,” she said.

Groups that track hate speech “are reporting increases in online attacks against many groups worldwide, and we continue our efforts to remove it,” Bickert said. 

The company says it removed 22.5 million pieces of hate speech shared on its platform in the second quarter of this year alone. Facebook has also banned more than 250

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BBC reverses decision to end Red Button services



a screen shot of a video game: Some people without online access still use red button services, via their TV remote control


© BBC
Some people without online access still use red button services, via their TV remote control

The BBC has reversed its decision to bring an end to its Red Button TV text services.

The corporation had planned to remove the service due to “financial pressure”.

However, following a campaign on behalf of people with disabilities, the elderly and those without online access, it has suspended the plan.

Basic key news services will now remain, although the platform will be reduced from next year.

‘Extensive dialogue’

In November 2019, the BBC announced its intention to remove the text and data element of the red button service.

But in January, the corporation halted the planned closure, in order to learn about the potential impact on certain parts of its audience.

“Since then, we have been in contact and had extensive dialogue with a wide range of representative groups to build on

Read More

BBC reverses decision to end Red Button text services

Some people without online access still use red button services, via their TV remote control
Some people without online access still use red button services, via their TV remote control

The BBC has reversed its decision to bring an end to its Red Button TV text services.

The corporation had planned to remove the service due to “financial pressure”.

However, following a campaign on behalf of people with disabilities, the elderly and those without online access, it has suspended the plan.

Basic key news services will now remain, although the platform will be reduced from next year.

‘Extensive dialogue’

In November 2019, the BBC announced its intention to remove the text and data element of the red button service.

But in January, the corporation halted the planned closure, in order to learn about the potential impact on certain parts of its audience.

“Since then, we have been in contact and had extensive dialogue with a wide range of representative groups to build on our existing

Read More