National Science Foundation Convergence Accelerator awards $1 million grant to RIT team

A Rochester Institute of Technology researcher is part of a team that has been awarded a National Science Foundation grant to use artificial intelligence to better understand the role of facial expressions in signed and spoken languages.

As part of the project, researchers will develop an application to teach American Sign Language learners about associated facial expressions and head gestures. They will also develop an application that makes the facial expressions of a signer anonymous, when privacy is a concern.

The nearly $1 million grant is part of the NSF Convergence Accelerator, a program that supports use-inspired, team-based, and multidisciplinary research to produce solutions to national-scale societal challenges.

The project, called Data and AI Methods for Modeling Facial Expressions in Language with Applications to Privacy for the Deaf, American Sign Language (ASL) Education and Linguistic Research, is co-led by a multidisciplinary team of researchers at three universities. The team includes

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RIT, URMC Receive NIH Funding to Study AI-Enabled Toilet Seat Technology for Heart Failure

Toilet seats with high tech sensors might be the non-invasive technology of the future that could help reduce hospital return rates of individuals with heart disease.

Heart failure is one of the leading causes of adults admitted to hospitals and more than six million adults in the United States have heart disease, according to the American Heart Association. Re-hospitalizations occur in some instances within 30 days to 6-months of initial treatment. Having a way to intercept these rehospitalizations might afford patients improved care and decrease costs.

A joint project by researchers at Rochester Institute of Technology and the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC), will determine if in-home monitoring can successfully monitor vital signs and reduce risk and costly re-hospitalization rates for people with heart failure. The five-year, $2.9 million venture, is funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Close up of FIT Seat technology embedded in a common toilet seat

Photo by: A. Sue Weisler, RIT University Communications

A close

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