Tape-out based on SMIC’s N+1 technology succeeds despite sanctions

SMIC. Photo: VCG

Innosilicon, a Chinese company focusing on one-stop intellectual property (IP) and customized chip design, announced on Monday that it has completed the world’s first chip tape-out and test based on the FinFET N+1 advanced technology of Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corp (SMIC), the largest Chinese chipmaker.

A tape-out is the final phase of a design life cycle for a chip design before manufacturing starts.

All IP is developed in-house and the functions are tested once, Innosilicon said on its website. The firm invested tens of millions of yuan into optimizing chip design in 2019, when SMIC’s N+1 process was not that mature, according to Innosilicon.

N+1, SMIC’s next-generation foundry node, offers a conspicuous improvement in performance and logic density. Compared with its existing 14-nanometer (nm) process, N+1 manufacturing technology can increase a chip’s performance by 20 percent and cut its power consumption by 57 percent, said Liang Mengsong,

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U.S. Sanctions Turn up Heat but Huawei Serving European 5G Clients, Executive Says | Top News

ZURICH (Reuters) – Chinese telecom giant Huawei is finding it harder to counter U.S. sanctions designed to choke off its access to semiconductors but can continue to serve European 5G network clients, a senior European executive told an Austrian newspaper.

The world’s biggest maker of mobile telecommunications equipment and smartphones was still “looking for a solution” to help millions of Huawei phone users after Google

was banned from providing technical support for new Huawei phone models using mobile operating system Android.

“Since the U.S. sanctions last year, U.S. manufacturers of semiconductors are no longer allowed to supply us so our previous U.S. partners can no longer work with us. Since August it has become even more difficult,” Abraham Liu, Huwaei’s vice-president for Europe, told the Kurier paper.

He said Washington was “blackmailing” chipmakers into shunning ties with Huawei, which denies U.S. allegations that Huawei equipment could be used by Beijing

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Samsung earnings soar on smartphone sales rebound, US sanctions on Huawei

Samsung predicts its profit jumped nearly 60% last quarter, suggesting it could soon retake its position as the world’s top smartphone seller from embattled Chinese rival Huawei.



a person standing in front of a mirror: A man wearing a protective mask walks past an advertisement for the Samsung Electronics Co. Galaxy Z Fold2 5G and Z Flip 5G smartphones at the company's D'light flagship store in Seoul, South Korea, on Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2020. Photographer: SeongJoon Cho/Bloomberg via Getty Images


© Cho/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A man wearing a protective mask walks past an advertisement for the Samsung Electronics Co. Galaxy Z Fold2 5G and Z Flip 5G smartphones at the company’s D’light flagship store in Seoul, South Korea, on Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2020. Photographer: SeongJoon Cho/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The South Korean conglomerate said on Thursday that it expects to make an operating profit of roughly 12.3 trillion won ($10.6 billion) for the July-September quarter. That’s up 58% from the same period a year ago. The estimates also beat the 26% profit bump analysts polled by data provider Refinitiv had predicted.

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Samsung said it expects sales for the third quarter will rise about 6% to 66 trillion won ($57 billion).

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Huawei’s Rivals Are Already Filling A $27 Billion Hole Left By US Sanctions

After more US sanctions have all-but-crippled the future of Huawei’s global networks business — and its efforts to become the dominant 5G provider — dollar signs are already materializing for its rivals.

At the crux of Huawei’s withdrawal is an annual $27 billion opportunity for its competitors — including Nokia, Ericsson and Samsung — to become the go-to providers of 5G and other telecommunication services to domestic carriers, says Ryan Koontz, an analyst at Rosenblatt Securities. “It’s a massive economic transition,” says Koontz. “It’s relatively urgent for these carriers to make the change.” 

The multi-billion dollar market opportunity, which hinges on Huawei’s sales figures for the year ended September, will not evaporate overnight, Koontz says, but will likely be absorbed over the next three to four years. 

Because

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U.S. sanctions on chipmaker SMIC hit at the very heart of China’s tech ambitions

  • The U.S. government has reportedly imposed restrictions that require suppliers to get an export license to sell certain equipment to China’s biggest chipmaker SMIC.
  • The move threatens to hit at the heart of China’s plans to boost its domestic semiconductor industry, a need that has been accelerated by the trade war with the U.S.
  • SMIC is seen as a critical part of China’s ambitions and the commerce department’s sanctions could hold back the company’s development for several years.



a circuit board: A close up image of a CPU socket and motherboard laying on the table.


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A close up image of a CPU socket and motherboard laying on the table.

GUANGZHOU, China — The U.S. government has reportedly imposed restrictions on exports to SMIC, China’s biggest chip manufacturer, a move that threatens Beijing’s push to become more self-reliant in one of the most critical areas of technology.

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Suppliers for certain equipment to SMIC will need to apply for an export license, according

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Treasury Sanctions Key Actors in Iran’s Nuclear and Ballistic Missile Programs



U.S. Department of the Treasury

September 21, 2020

Action taken in support of the re-imposition of UN sanctions on Iran lifted under UNSCR 2231

WASHINGTON – Today, the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) sanctioned three Deputy Directors of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) and a number of its subsidiaries. Companies supplying equipment for Iran’s ballistic missile production overseen by Iran’s Aerospace Industries Organization (AIO) and senior officials working on Iran’s missile programs have also been designated. Today’s actions by Treasury, the Department of State, and the Department of Commerce target entities and personnel directly involved in Iran’s nuclear, ballistic missile, and conventional arms programs.

“The Trump Administration remains fully committed to its maximum pressure campaign against the Iranian regime to prevent the production of a nuclear weapon and other malign activities,” said Secretary Steven T. Mnuchin. “The Treasury Department will not hesitate

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Factbox: U.S. imposes new sanctions on Iran after U.N. standoff over arms

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The United States on Monday imposed new sanctions on individuals and entities involved in Iran’s nuclear, missile and conventional arms programs, to support its assertion that all U.N. sanctions against Tehran are now resumed.

The impetus behind the U.S. action is the impending expiry of a U.N. arms embargo on Iran and a desire to warn foreign actors – U.S. entities are already barred from such trade – that if they buy or sell arms to Iran they will face U.S. sanctions.

The Trump administration announced the following measures:

TRUMP’S EXECUTIVE ORDER

U.S. President Donald Trump issued a new executive order targeting Iran-related conventional arms transfers, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said in a statement, adding that the new tool will help Washington hold accountable those who seek to evade the U.N. arms embargo on Iran.

ADDITIONAL SANCTIONS ON CONVENTIONAL ARMS-RELATED ACTIVITIES

– Sanctions added on

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