Area schools ask voters to pitch in for new schools

Franklin hopes to use the local bond funds to build a new high school by fall 2023 and renovate the existing high school into a middle school. A few years later, it would use state funds to replace its five elementary schools and one early childhood center with three new elementaries.

The Warren County auditor certified Franklin’s ballot issue at 6.52 mills, which would cost the owner of a $100,000 home $228 a year. But Superintendent Mike Sander said the district has vowed to collect no more than 4.95 mills, which would cost $174 annually on that $100,000 home.

Treasurer Rob Giuffre said Franklin plans an “even-millage” approach, with residents paying about 4.94 mills all 37 years, rather than a model where residents pay 5-8 mills per year in the first decade, then 2-4 mills per year near the end of the debt. The district’s “anticipated debt schedule” shows that

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New York City high schools resumed in-person classes Thursday, completing the final phase of reopening the nation’s largest school system. (Oct. 1)

AP Domestic

According to a survey conducted in August, about half of U.S. school districts planned to reintroduce full-time in-person learning this fall, with the remainder either resuming the virtual learning processes introduced during the early months of the COVID-19 outbreak or using a hybrid model.

Many schools throughout the country that have attempted to start the year with full in-person classes have already had to revert to virtual learning. With regional cases high in many parts of the country and the possibility of cases resurging in the future in others, it is unclear how long before normal in-person classes will resume nationwide. Also unclear is the long-term effects that school closure and virtual learning will have on student development.

Already, the public education system in the

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Ballad, Lee County schools awarded grants to expand technology services | Latest Headlines

Two regional entities will receive a combined $1.06 million to expand services in two rural Southwest Virginia counties.

Ballad Health will receive $313,361 to support a school-based telemedicine virtual health clinic program in Lee and Smyth counties. The Lee County school district is getting $752,857 to implement science technology engineering and math courses and technology, according to a written statement issued by Virginia U.S. Sens. Mark Warner and Tim Kaine.

This funding was awarded through the distance learning and telemedicine grant program of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development.

The Ballad grant will improve access to acute sick care for schoolchildren and faculty and removes transportation as an obstacle to care. This rural investment will benefit approximately 46,765 residents across both Virginia and Tennessee, according to the statement.

The Lee grant will give students in alternative education programs the opportunity to attend their classes in real time, enable teachers

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New technology may help detect COVID-19 in schools | Good News

Is the election hurting your mental health? An expert weighs in

Less than 30 days out from one of the most divisive elections in American history, stress and anxiety around politics is an an all-time high. Yahoo Life Mental Health Contributor, Jen Harstein, says that it’s important to become aware of how your mental health could be taking a toll this election season.

“Even for those of us who have been part of many elections and voted many different times, this is something none of us have ever experienced,” she says.

Hartstein says one of the most important things you can do is create set times during the day to unplug. “We live in a 24 hour news cycle, and the news is coming at us all the time, and it’s intense,” Hartstein explains. “That doesn’t do such great things for our body’s ability to calm down, reset and relax.”

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TEA Announces Additional Innovative Learning Solutions for K-12 English and Spanish, and K-5 Science to Support Schools Across Texas

TEA Announces Additional Innovative Learning Solutions for K-12 English and Spanish, and K-5 Science to Support Schools Across Texas

PR Newswire

AUSTIN, Texas, Oct. 5, 2020

AUSTIN, Texas, Oct. 5, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — ICYMI The Texas Education Agency announced Great Minds as the creator of PhD Science TEKS Edition for Texas home learning for Grades K–5. This follows the agency’s selection of Great Minds to create Eureka Math in Sync TEKS Edition for Grades K–5. The TEA news release is below. Great Minds contact: Chad Colby, [email protected], 202-297-9437.

(PRNewsfoto/Great Minds)
(PRNewsfoto/Great Minds)

The Texas Education Agency today announced the next set of instructional materials – covering K-12 English Language Arts and Reading (ELAR), K-5 Spanish Language Arts and Reading (SLAR), and K-5 Science – that will be made available to school systems through the Texas Home Learning 3.0 (THL 3.0) initiative. Like other THL 3.0 offerings, these instructional materials are

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The Latest: Indiana Schools Use $200M Federal Aid for Virus | World News

INDIANAPOLIS — Indiana schools are slowly making a dent in more than $200 million of federal aid meant to help local districts manage financial hardships spurred by the coronavirus.

Since May, nearly $22 million of Indiana’s share of federal CARES Act aid has been issued to school districts around the state, according to the Indiana Department of Education. State officials say millions more are expected to be given out in the coming months.

The financial help is intended to buy remote learning technology, equipment for sanitizing school buildings, protective equipment, staff training and emotional support for students.

State Superintendent Jennifer McCormick cautions the federal aid isn’t as much as it seems, adding that no one is going to “get rich” with the extra money.

HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— Trump at military hospital; new cases among allies emerge

— Cavalier White House approach to

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Indiana schools use $200M federal aid for virus

INDIANAPOLIS — Indiana schools are slowly making a dent in more than $200 million of federal aid meant to help local districts manage financial hardships spurred by the coronavirus.

Since May, nearly $22 million of Indiana’s share of federal CARES Act aid has been issued to school districts around the state, according to the Indiana Department of Education. State officials say millions more are expected to be given out in the coming months.

The financial help is intended to buy remote learning technology, equipment for sanitizing school buildings, protective equipment, staff training and emotional support for students.


State Superintendent Jennifer McCormick cautions the federal aid isn’t as much as it seems, adding that no one is going to “get rich” with the extra money.

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HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— Trump at military hospital; new cases among allies emerge

— Cavalier White House approach

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Tech leaders emerge from under-resourced schools thanks to this program

Danielle Page, for Verizon
Published 9:12 a.m. ET Oct. 1, 2020

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See the Verizon Innovative Learning program featured as part of USA TODAY Network’s The Storytellers Project.

USA TODAY

Here’s how one company is empowering students through technology.

James Allrich, principal at Argyle Magnet Middle School in Silver Spring, Maryland, has always had a reputation for being the go-to tech guy.

“For me, technology is just one of those things that’s always been easy for me — I view it as a tool to make life and things we do a lot easier,” he said.

This school program supports digital learning and inclusion. (Photo: Getty Images)

So when the opportunity to become part of the Verizon Innovative Learning program, which provides technology-based STEM curriculums — focused on science, technology, engineering and math — and gives each student and teacher a device and monthly data plan, Allrich knew the potential

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Covid’s Rising Again in New York. Keep the Schools Open.

(Bloomberg Opinion) — Few pandemic decisions have become as destructively politicized as school closures. As a New Yorker article noted this week, whether schools are open depends more on a community’s support for Donald Trump than on its Covid-19 infection rate.

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And now a small resurgence of the virus in New York City has schools facing possible closure. An uptick this week has brought what’s called the positivity rate above 3% for the last several days. Under current policy, a seven-day average over 3% will trigger school closings. It’s not clear that 3% is the right cut-off for closing schools, though, or that re-closing the public schools would slow the pandemic.

The positivity rate represents the percent of positive tests among all those tested in a given time period. Epidemiologists say it’s a measure that depends in part on how much testing is being done. If only the

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Rapid Coronavirus Test Could Be Game-Changer For CT Schools

CONNECTICUT — Connecticut will soon get around 69,000 new Abbott Labs rapid coronavirus test kits from the federal government. They could be a potential game-changer for helping to avoid unnecessary school closures, especially as the state enters the late fall and winter months when colds and other respiratory infections are more common.

The rapid tests can be done on-site and give results in 15 minutes.

Connecticut will also roll out the Apple/Google developed contact tracing app as another tool to help reduce coronavirus transmission.

The federal government is buying all of Abbott’s capacity for 150 million tests over the next few months to help encourage schools to get students back into the classroom. Connecticut will get around 1 million test kits over the next few months, Gov. Ned Lamont said.

“It means perhaps you don’t have to quarantine because we’ll be able to tell you that was the sniffles, that’s

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