Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University Utilizes AMD EPYC Processors for Scientific Research

AMD (NASDAQ: AMD) and the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University have reported the deployment of AMD EPYC 7702 processors for use in a new high performance computing system.  The EPYC processor will be utilized in a supercomputer to deliver 2.36 petaflops of computing power as the institute plans to use for scientific research.  The Scientific Computing & Data Analysis Section of the institute plans to implement its new supercomputer to support intensive research from bioinformatics, computational neurosciences and physics.

“2020 is a milestone year for OIST with new research units expanding the number of research areas. This growth is driving a significant increase in our computational needs,” said Eddy Taillefer, Ph.D., Section Leader, Scientific Computing & Data Analysis Section. “Under the common resource model for which the computing system is shared by all OIST users we needed a significant increase in core-count capacity to both absorb these

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The Quantum Prisoner, a free scientific and technological video game is now available online

The Quantum Prisoner, a free scientific and technological video game is now available online
Credit: CEA

Science, logic, and technology are your best allies in The Quantum Prisoner, a completely free browser-based point-and-click adventure that is today playable in English on PC, Mac and mobile devices and tablets. Featuring 10-12 hours of gameplay, The Quantum Prisoner takes you on a journey around the globe to find out what happened to the physician Artus Cropp, who mysteriously disappeared back in the 1960s. Playing as Zoe, curious and resourceful young woman, you must solve more than 30 technology, science and engineering-based puzzles from operating particle accelerators and fuel cells to robots and more. You will escape perilous situations, progress through your investigation and make a discovery that will change the world!


“As a public science research organization, the CEA aims to open up the exciting world of science to the next generation of budding young brilliant minds and so made The Quantum Prisoner into a completely

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Quantitative Scientific Solutions Awarded SBIR Contract by Office of Naval Research

The Daily Beast

Photos Show Why Miami Public Schools Could Be the Next Ron DeSantis Coronavirus Debacle

MIAMI—Last week, a few days before Donald Trump revealed he came down with COVID-19, Karla Hernandez-Mats went on a coronavirus safety fact-finding mission in South Florida schools ahead of their reopening on Monday.The president of United Teachers of Dade, the local teachers union, Hernandez-Mats said she and her colleagues conducted surprise inspection visits at 17 Miami-area schools that suggested administrators were still scrambling to put safety measures in place.At Miami Springs Senior High, one of the 17 schools inspected, administrators initially refused to allow her colleague, United Teachers of Dade First Vice-President Antonio White, to enter the building and called a police resource officer on him, the union officials told The Daily Beast.“When administrators act like that, their schools are usually not prepared,” White said in an interview. “That was the case at

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The Nobel Prizes Have a Diversity Problem Worse Than the Scientific Fields They Honor | Best Countries

In 2007, I served as a consultant for the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences’ deliberations about the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. As a result, I was invited to attend the Nobel ceremonies. Staying at the Grand Hotel with all the awardees, I got to see how scientists – excellent but largely unknown outside their fields – suddenly became superstars.

As soon as they’re announced annually in early October, Nobel laureates become role models who are invited to give seminars all around the world. In Stockholm for the awards, these scientists were interviewed on radio and television and hobnobbed with Swedish royalty. Swedish television aired the events of Nobel week live.

As a chemist who has also investigated how science is done, seeing scientists and their research jump to the top of the public’s consciousness thanks to all the Nobel hoopla is gratifying. But in the 119 years since the Nobel

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Talk of a scientific rift is a dangerous distraction in the fight against Covid-19 | Coronavirus outbreak

The cardinal rule of coronavirus policy is that you must follow “the science”. Or, at the very least, you must say that you are. After the US’s disastrous response to the pandemic, Donald Trump still insists he is “guided by science”. In the UK, Boris Johnson and his ministers always claimed that our own bumbling response was either “led by the science” or “following the science”, even as Britain’s infection rate soared above other countries that were also, in their own words, following the science.

Sometimes it is easy for us to separate out false claims about science from real ones. Early in the crisis, the majority of mainstream scientists, and institutions such as the World Health Organization, supported swift lockdown measures. Trump resisted this approach, instead putting his faith in quack cures that his closest scientific advisers clearly opposed. Johnson has tended to drag his heels, taking the

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Industry and scientific leaders examine Covid-19-era inequities, emphasize rapid testing | MIT News

“Covid-19 is both a wildfire and a spotlight. [It] has imposed a terrible burden of suffering on certain individuals, families, and communities. Yet it has left others almost untouched,” said President L. Rafael Reif at the inaugural MIT Forefront, a new virtual series created by the Institute. “But the pandemic has also forced the nation to focus on deep, longstanding inequalities. [T]oday, we will explore meaningful ways to disrupt the inequalities of Covid.”

 Through MIT Forefront, the Institute aims to scout the frontiers of science and technology for bold new answers to urgent global problems. On Sept. 24, the first session, “Disrupting the Inequalities of Covid-19 in Work and Health Care,” brought business and policy leaders and MIT experts together to share knowledge and discuss strategies for building a more equitable future.

The hourlong event, viewed live by more than 1,000 people, began with a video from Mariana Matus PhD

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Flutter Entertainment and Scientific Games Celebrate 20 Year Global Sports Betting Partnership with Long-Term Renewal

Scientific Games fueling sport betting growth for FanDuel, Betfair, Paddy Power, Sky Betting and Gaming and Sportsbet

LAS VEGAS, Sept. 28, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Scientific Games Corporation (NASDAQ: SGMS) (“Scientific Games” or the “Company”) secured a five-year contract renewal with long-term customer Flutter Entertainment plc to continue providing its OpenSports™ technology to the operators’ portfolio of global brands.

Scientific Games Corporation
Scientific Games Corporation

Flutter Entertainment is the world’s leading sports betting, gaming and entertainment provider serving over 13 million customers worldwide through its innovative, diverse and distinctive brands including FanDuel in the U.S., Paddy Power, Betfair and Sky Bet in the U.K. and Europe and SportsBet in Australia.

The five-year renewal comes on the back of FanDuel selecting Scientific Games to power their sportsbook offering across all current and future regulated markets in the U.S.

Flutter Entertainment and Scientific Games first partnered with Paddy Power in 2000 making

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Who’s Tweeting about scientific research? And why?

Who's Tweeting about scientific research? And why?
Graphic overview of Twitter users and followers. Credit: Carlson et al, 2020

Although Twitter is best known for its role in political and cultural discourse, it has also become an increasingly vital tool for scientific communication. The record of social media engagement by laypeople is decoded by a new study publishing in the open access journal PLOS Biology, where researchers from the University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, show that Twitter users can be characterized in extremely fine detail by mining a relatively untapped source of information: how those users’ followers describe themselves. This study reveals some exciting—and, at times, disturbing—patterns of how research is received and disseminated through social media.


Scientists candidly tweet about their unpublished research not only to one another but also to a broader audience of engaged laypeople. When consumers of cutting-edge science tweet or retweet about studies they find interesting, they leave behind

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APS Congressional Science Fellow Put Scientific Skills to Use During COVID-19 Crisis

Prior to dealing with the coronavirus health crisis, Gladstone said the first step in her fellowship was getting acclimated to working in US Sen. Gary Peters’ office. Peters, who represents Michigan, is the Ranking Member of the HSGAC.

“Each Senator’s office runs differently, like each professor’s research group functions differently. I started by taking notes at constituent meetings, briefings, and hearings (and learning the difference between those). I summarized other people’s positions into one-page decision memos, and in doing so, learned about their work and how the office flows,” she said.

Gladstone recalled there was plenty of work to do to stay on top of the health crisis.

“From January to March, we were getting reports, preparing for hearings, and working with the Federal Emergency Management Agency. I sent notes around my office from COVID-19 hearings, explaining the difference between COVID-19 and SARS-COV-2,” she said.

Gladstone said that chance meetings

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Who’s Tweeting about scientific research? And why? — ScienceDaily

Although Twitter is best known for its role in political and cultural discourse, it has also become an increasingly vital tool for scientific communication. The record of social media engagement by laypeople is decoded by a new study publishing in the open access journal PLOS Biology, where researchers from the University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, show that Twitter users can be characterized in extremely fine detail by mining a relatively untapped source of information: how those users’ followers describe themselves. This study reveals some exciting — and, at times, disturbing — patterns of how research is received and disseminated through social media.

Scientists candidly tweet about their unpublished research not only to one another but also to a broader audience of engaged laypeople. When consumers of cutting-edge science tweet or retweet about studies they find interesting, they leave behind a real-time record of the impact that taxpayer-funded

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