‘Two Screens for Teachers’ to supply extra monitors in Seattle and puts out call for help in other cities

The two-screen setup of an elementary school teacher in Seattle. (Photo courtesy of Two Screens for Teachers)

Remote teaching is about to get a little bit easier for thousands of teachers in Seattle Public Schools. The nonprofit organization “Two Screens for Teachers” announced Tuesday that it’s purchasing a second computer monitor for every teacher who needs one, and plans to deliver about 3,000 monitors at a value of around $430,000.

Started by a small group of Seattle startup veterans, Two Screens for Teachers aims to boost teacher productivity through added technology, helping to make remote instruction less stressful during the ongoing pandemic.

Matt Lerner and Mike Mathieu are behind the idea. They previously co-founded Walk Score, a Seattle startup that sold to Redfin in 2014. Their hope is that their latest cause will spread beyond Seattle and they can inspire techies in other cities to purchase monitors for the thousands

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As Seattle Companies Accelerate Technology Investments, Few Employees Say New Technologies Have a Positive Impact on their Organizations

Lack of Employee Input & Training Puts Technology and Automation ROI at Risk

SEATTLE, Oct. 6, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Seattle companies continue to invest heavily in technologies such as automation, robotics and artificial intelligence (AI) to reinvent how work is done. But as companies in the Seattle area increasingly deploy new technologies, they may miss major opportunities to get the most out of their investments because of a missing critical factor – employee engagement. 

According to a new survey of Seattle workers by Eagle Hill Consulting, only 29 percent say that their company invests in the right technologies to support them.
According to a new survey of Seattle workers by Eagle Hill Consulting, only 29 percent say that their company invests in the right technologies to support them.

According to a new survey of Seattle workers by Eagle Hill Consulting, only 29 percent say that their company invests in the right technologies to support them. And just 38 percent agree that technology change has had a positive impact on the organization.

Also, about three-fourths of Seattle

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Seattle startup Skilljar raises $33M as pandemic sparks demand for its customer education software

Skilljar co-founders Sandi Lin (left) and Jason Stewart. (Skilljar Photos)

The third time really has been a charm for Sandi Lin and Jason Stewart.

The entrepreneurs began their startup journey in 2013 when the former Amazon employees launched Everpath, a Techstars Seattle company that tried to build a Yelp for online classes. They soon pivoted and began targeting independent instructors, offering them a platform to host online education.

“I call those my first two failed startups,” Lin said this week.

It was the third evolution of the original idea that really took off. Lin and Stewart saw a lot of interest from enterprise companies needing help building customer education experiences. They ultimately launched Skilljar, which has now delivered more than 10 million hours of instruction and 100 million lessons via on-demand and virtual live training programs hosted on its learning management platform.

Skilljar is set to grow even more after

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UW researchers driving around Seattle using Street View-style camera to study response to pandemic

In images of of the streets of Seattle, University of Washington researchers are using algorithms to help identify things such as cars, people and whether they are physically distancing in each frame of (University of Washington Photo)

The COVID-19 pandemic has altered life as we know it in Seattle, and a team from the University of Washington is conducting research using images from around the city to better understand just how much.

Since May, researchers have been driving around Seattle, scanning the streets with a car-mounted camera similar to Google’s Street View technology. Images capture a particular point in time and illustrate whether people are outside, how many cars are on the road, which business are open and so forth. According to UW News, researchers hope the massive data set will help answer questions about what makes a city resilient and how to better prepare for potential future pandemics and

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Seattle approves minimum pay rate for Uber and Lyft drivers

(Reuters) – The Seattle City Council passed a minimum pay standard for drivers for companies like Uber Technologies Inc UBER.N and Lyft Inc LYFT.O on Tuesday.

Under the ordinance, effective January, the drivers will now earn at least $16.39 per hour – the minimum wage in Seattle for companies with more than 500 employees.

Seattle’s law, modeled after a similar regulation in New York City, aims to reduce the amount of time drivers spend “cruising” without a passenger by paying drivers more during those times.

City officials argue this should prevent Uber and Lyft from oversaturating the market at drivers’ expense, but the companies say it would effectively force them to block some drivers access to the app. Both Uber and Lyft have locked out drivers in response to the NYC law.

“The City’s plan is deeply flawed and will actually destroy jobs for thousands of people — as many

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A Seattle startup shines light on the face masks of the future

The mask works with an App that’s compatible with iOS and Android phones. People can write custom text and draw images or animations.

A Seattle woman is creating a very unique mask and helping raise funds for coronavirus relief in the process. 

Chelsea Klukas is an entrepreneur and the co-founder of the internationally acclaimed fashion technology organization MakeFasion. She spent years fusing fashion and technology in Canada before moving to Seattle a few years ago and created Lumen Couture.

Klukas creates what she calls “FashionTech for everyday wear, special events and performers.” Her collection features dresses and other garments that have been fused with embedded LED technology that brings wardrobe to life with vibrant colors, designs and even messages.  

“When the pandemic happened nobody was going out and I wasn’t involved in fashion shows and sort of created my next garment by accident,” she said.

Klukas was working on

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Seattle startup Resonance AI raises $2.2M to analyze dialogue, mood, music in video content

The Resonance.AI team, including co-founder Tom Chiarella (far right, second row), and co-founder Randa Minkarah (second from left, second row).

TV news broadcasters, productions studios, and others are using technology from a Seattle startup to analyze their video content and make changes based on audience reception.

Resonance AI recently reeled in $2.28 million of a larger investment round to fuel growth of its video analysis platform that uses artificial intelligence to measure dialogue, music, mood, lighting, pacing, movement, and more.

The startup provides data that helps content creators figure out what resonates with an audience. It can answer questions such as: Who is my most valuable talent? What types of stories resonate by market? Is the editing of my show too fast-paced?

The 6-year-old startup is led by CEO and co-founder Tom Chiarella, a former exec at Statera and General Electric, as well as president and co-founder Randa Minkarah, a

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Seattle startup Level sees growth for flexible credit service used by independent contractors

Level CEO David Edelstein. (Level Photos)

Millions of independent contractors are making money in the gig economy, but many don’t have access to financial credit services to help grow their personal microbusinesses.

Level wants to help. The Seattle startup partners with marketplace platforms such as Dolly and Keepe, which use Level to offer workers flexible credit options that are only paid back when they earn.

Level CEO and founder David Edelstein said the company is seeing traction amid the pandemic as both supply of workers and demand for on-demand services rises. Level is on track to extend more than $1 million in cash advances by the end of the year.

“We identified an opportunity to empower people in the rapidly growing on-demand economy to grow their microbusinesses, while addressing challenges faced by labor marketplaces seeking to grow their companies,” Edelstein said.

Level graduated from Techstars Seattle last year. Edelstein previously

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