Shining A Spotlight On Corporate Readiness Through The Lens Of Learning And Development

CEO of AllenComm since 2003.

Corporate leaders have long understood that demonstrating value to shareholders must include navigating and managing change. From the early days of Kurt Lewin’s change management model, it has been well understood that companies need to adequately prepare for both sudden unexpected shifts and gradual changes.

The current economic and health crises have propelled organizations toward long-overdue examinations of the role of employee training and development in shaping corporate readiness. It’s often said that 70% of change initiatives fail. While the Harvard Business Review has estimated that number is actually around 10%, it should still be no surprise that failure to adapt to changes due to the coronavirus can have far-reaching ramifications for employees and stockholders.

Although industries have seen several sudden disruptions due to advancements in technology, sudden changes due to Covid-19 have revealed unexpected challenges. Some organizations quickly overcame or adapted to these

Read More

Mars is shining extra bright. Here’s why and how to see it.

Mars is putting on quite a show for skywatchers this month.

For most of October, Mars will be brighter in the night sky than anything else in its vicinity, offering people a clear view of the red planet. Mars is also days away from reaching “opposition,” a celestial alignment in which Earth, Mars and the sun form a straight line in space, with Earth in the middle.

Mars will be at opposition Oct. 13. On that day, Mars will rise as the sun sets, reach its peak in the night sky at midnight, and then set as the sun rises again. If it’s a clear night, skywatchers can expect the red planet to outshine anything else in its region of the sky.

Mars oppositions typically occur every 26 months. Since Earth is closer to the sun, it circles the star two times in roughly the time it takes Mars to

Read More

Shining light on heating the solar corona

sun
X-rays stream off the sun in this image showing observations from by NASA’s Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, overlaid on a picture taken by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Credit: NASA

In a paper published today in Nature Astronomy, researchers report the first ever clear images of nanojets—bright thin lights that travel perpendicular to the magnetic structures in the solar atmosphere, called the corona—in a process that reveals the existence of one of the potential coronal heating candidates: nanoflares.


In pursuit of understanding why the Sun’s atmosphere is so much hotter than the surface, and to help differentiate between a host of theories about what causes this heating, researchers turn to NASA’s Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) mission. IRIS was finely tuned with a high-resolution imager to zoom in on specific hard-to-see events on the Sun.

Nanoflares are small explosions on the Sun—but they are difficult to spot.

Read More