Japan firms fall woefully short of meeting government goals on women in management: Reuters poll

By Tetsushi Kajimoto

TOKYO (Reuters) – About one-fifth of Japanese companies have no female managers and most say women account for less than 10% of management, a Reuters monthly poll found, highlighting the struggle for the government’s “womenomics” drive to make headway.

The survey results come as Japan is seen to delay its target this year to raise the share of women in leadership posts to 30% as part of the government’s campaign to empower women, dubbed “womenomics”, and cope with Japan’s ageing population.

The Reuters Corporate Survey, conducted Sept. 29-Oct. 8, found 71% of Japanese firms said women accounted for less than 10% of management, while 17% had no female managers at all.

Asked how much scope there was to increase female managers, 55% said by around 10%, a quarter said by about 20%, one in 10 firms said by around 30%, while 5% saw no room for that.

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Ryugu’s rubble suggests its short life has been rather turbulent

Sept. 21 (UPI) — The asteroid Ryugu is a loose assemblage of fragments from a collision between two asteroids, according to new research published Monday in the journal Nature Astronomy.

Some asteroids are composed of large, solid pieces of rock, but Ryugu is more like a rubble pile than a rock. It is too small and fragile to have remained intact for very long — scientists estimate Ryugu formed between 10 million to 20 million years ago.

“Ryugu is too small to have survived the whole 4.6 billion years of solar system history,” Seiji Sugita, professor of planetary sciences at the University of Tokyo in Japan, said in a news release. “Ryugu-sized objects would be disrupted by other asteroids within several hundred million years on average.”

“We think Ryugu spent most of its life as part of a larger, more solid parent body,” Sugita said. “This is based on observations

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