Eight nations sign NASA’s Artemis Accords that guide cooperative exploration of the moon

Eight countries have signed on as founding member nations to NASA’s Artemis Accords during the 71st International Astronautical Congress this week.



a couple of people that are standing in the dirt


© NASA


Those nations include Australia, Canada, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, the United Arab Emirates, the United Kingdom and the United States of America.

Loading...

Load Error

NASA released the Artemis Accords in May to establish a framework of principles for safely and responsibly planning for humanity’s return to the moon.

“Artemis will be the broadest and most diverse international human space exploration program in history, and the Artemis Accords are the vehicle that will establish this singular global coalition,” said NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine in a statement.

“With today’s signing, we are uniting with our partners to explore the Moon and are establishing vital principles that will create a safe, peaceful, and prosperous future in space for all of humanity to enjoy.”

It’s been more than a year since NASA

Read More

Eight nations, including U.S., sign accords for moon missions

ORLANDO, Fla., Oct. 13 (UPI) — Eight nations have signed NASA’s new framework to govern lunar exploration missions, the agency’s administrator, Jim Bridenstine, announced Tuesday.

By signing the agreement, the eight nations commit to peaceful activities on the moon and in travel to the moon.

Provisions in the Artemis Accords stipulate that nations, and private companies in those nations, will openly disclose plans for lunar missions, and mine resources on the moon in accordance with the international Outer Space Treaty that dates to 1967.

The accords also commit signing nations to render aid to other nations on the moon if necessary, to minimize space debris and to register all objects taken to the lunar surface.

In addition to the United States, Australia, Canada, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, United Arab Emirates and Britain signed the Artemis Accords.

“We are one human race and we are in this together. The Accords help us

Read More

U.S. and other nations sign Artemis Accords for moon missions

Artemis moon mission
An artist’s conception shows surface operations on the moon. (NASA Illustration)

Seven nations have signed up with the United States to participate in NASA’s Artemis effort to put astronauts on the moon by as early as 2024.

The Artemis Accords commit the signatories — including Australia, Britain, Canada, Japan, Italy, Luxembourg and the United Arab Emirates as well as the U.S. — to observe a set of principles ranging from the interoperability of space hardware to the protection of heritage sites and space property rights.

NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine and other international representatives announced the signing of the accords today in conjunction with this week’s International Astronautical Congress.

During a briefing with reporters, Bridenstine said the accords will serve as the “preamble of bilateral agreements between the United States and all of our international partners as we go sustainably to the moon with commercial and international partners.”

It’ll be up

Read More

How could a toxic gas be a sign of life of Venus?

Scientists recently announced that they had found possible signs of life in the clouds of Venus. We probably should have suspected as much all along.

Venus is a natural place to look for life beyond Earth. It is Earth’s twin — almost the same size and structure — and closer to us than Mars, the current favorite of astronomers looking for life elsewhere in the solar system. Venus is also closer to the Sun, which provides the warmth necessary for life as we know it. In the past, a few scientists have suggested that Venus was a source of primordial life that was later seeded on Earth. That theory, lithopanspermia, never gained popularity because current conditions on Venus seemed very inhospitable to life. The high concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere of Venus ensures that the planet has a runaway greenhouse effect that makes its surface incredibly hot, way

Read More

You can now sign up to test Microsoft Flight Simulator in VR

The new Microsoft Flight Simulator is an immersive beast of a PC game, and we can only imagine how immersive it might get in VR — but you might not have to imagine much longer, because Microsoft has just opened signups (via Eurogamer) for a closed beta of the virtual reality experience.

There are quite a few requirements if you want to be considered, though. Not only do you have to own the game, have a Windows Mixed Reality headset, be a registered Microsoft Flight Simulator “Insider” and sign an NDA, you’ll need a slightly beefier PC than the base game — with an Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 or better sporting 8GB of VRAM, as well as 16GB of system memory.

And, you’ll need to prove your PC qualifies by submitting your DxDiag (press your Windows start button, type “dxdiag”, hit Enter) so Microsoft can confirm those specs and

Read More

Lahore Qalandars, Ministry of Science sign MoU to develop sports technologies

Lahore Qalandars CEO Atif Rana, federal sci-tech minister Fawad Chaudhry and LQ head coach Aaqib Javed at a press conference.

Lahore Qalandars have signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with the Ministry of Science and Technology in a bid to revolutionise “to promote and proliferate the use of the latest technologies in sports”.

The MoU was signed in Islamabad between Fawad Chaudhry, the federal minister of science and technology, and Atif Rana – the CEO of Lahore Qalandars.

According to the MoU, both parties will work to introduce latest technologies to improve the fitness and performance of players.

Among the technologies mentioned in the MoU are the introduction of smart ball technology, smart cricket bat technology, advanced data analysis program, wearable devices for illegal bowling action and scientifically prepared bowling shoes in Pakistan.

Lahore Qalandars, the MoU document says, will introduce the technologies at its High-Performance Center.

“Technology is updating

Read More

Delirium a key sign of COVID-19 in frail, older people — ScienceDaily

A new analysis of data from researchers at King’s College London using information from the COVID Symptom Study app and patients admitted to St Thomas’ Hospital in London, has shown that delirium — a state of acute confusion associated with a higher risk of serious illness and death — is a key symptom of COVID-19 in frail, older people.

The findings, published in the journal Age and Ageing, highlight that doctors and carers should be aware of delirium as a possible early warning sign of COVID-19 in the elderly, even in the absence of more typical symptoms such as cough or fever.

Led by clinical fellow and geriatrician Dr Rose Penfold at King’s College London, the researchers analysed data from two groups of older people aged 65 or over from March through May. The first group included 322 patients admitted to hospital with COVID-19 who had tested positive for

Read More

Bitcoin Balances on Exchanges at 2-Year Low and That May Be a Bullish Sign

The balance of bitcoin on major exchanges has hit its lowest levels since November 2018. Yet unlike that time, when bitcoin was in the depths of the crypto winter, some see this current spate of low bitcoin balances on exchanges as a sign that a new generation of investors is putting its money in it for the long term.

The last time bitcoin balances on exchanges were at this low a point was in November 2018, according to data from Glassnode. A hard fork on Bitcoin Cash that month may have also caused the declining bitcoin balances on exchanges since some owners were moving their bitcoins to private wallets in order to claim the new tokens from the fork. Bitcoin then continued its bearish trend into the beginning of 2019, before it recovered in April of that year.

Long-term holders as a possible reason

Low bitcoin balances on centralized exchanges

Read More

T-knife and Catalent Sign Technology Transfer and Manufacturing Agreement for Autologous T-Cell Receptor-Based Cell Therapy

T-knife GmbH, a next-generation adoptive T-cell company using its proprietary humanized T-cell receptor (HuTCR) mouse platform to treat solid tumors, and Catalent, the leading global provider of advanced delivery technologies, development, and manufacturing solutions for drugs, biologics, cell and gene therapies, and consumer health products, today announced they have signed an agreement to provide technology transfer and CGMP clinical manufacturing of T-knife’s T1367 T-cell receptor (TCR) program.

BERLIN, Germany and SOMERSET, N.J., Sept. 21, 2020 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ — T-knife GmbH, a next-generation adoptive T-cell company using its proprietary humanized T-cell receptor (HuTCR) mouse platform to treat solid tumors, and Catalent, the leading global provider of advanced delivery technologies, development, and manufacturing solutions for drugs, biologics, cell and gene therapies, and consumer health products, today announced they have signed an agreement to provide technology transfer and CGMP clinical manufacturing of T-knife’s T1367 T-cell receptor (TCR) program.

T1367 is an autologous T-cell

Read More

T-knife and Catalent Sign Technology Transfer and Manufacturing Agreement for Autologous T-Cell …

BERLIN, GERMANY, and SOMERSET, N.J. – September 21, 2020 — T-knife GmbH, a next-generation adoptive T-cell company using its proprietary humanized T-cell receptor (HuTCR) mouse platform to treat solid tumors, and Catalent, the leading global provider of advanced delivery technologies, development, and manufacturing solutions for drugs, biologics, cell and gene therapies, and consumer health products, today announced they have signed an agreement to provide technology transfer and cGMP clinical manufacturing of T-knife’s T1367 T-cell receptor (TCR) program.

T1367 is an autologous T-cell receptor-based cell therapy derived from T-knife’s proprietary humanized T-cell receptor (HuTCR) mouse platform and specifically targets MAGE-A1 positive tumors in cancer patients. The therapy is expected to be manufactured for clinical trials in both the European Union and the United States.

Under the terms of the agreement, Catalent will undertake transfer of T-knife´s platform process for T-cell receptor-based cell therapy at its site in Gosselies, Belgium, with the

Read More