Planet collision simulations give clues to atmospheric loss from Moon’s origin — ScienceDaily

Earth could have lost anywhere between ten and 60 per cent of its atmosphere in the collision that is thought to have formed the Moon.

New research led by Durham University, UK, shows how the extent of atmospheric loss depends upon the type of giant impact with the Earth.

Researchers ran more than 300 supercomputer simulations to study the consequences that different huge collisions have on rocky planets with thin atmospheres.

Their findings have led to the development of a new way to predict the atmospheric loss from any collision across a wide range of rocky planet impacts that could be used by scientists who are investigating the Moon’s origins or other giant impacts.

They also found that slow giant impacts between young planets and massive objects could add significant atmosphere to a planet if the impactor also has a lot of atmosphere.

The findings are published in the Astrophysical

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Promising computer simulations for stellarator plasmas

Promising computer simulations for stellarator plasmas
The magnetic cage generated by the magnetic coils (grey) shapes and encloses the plasma. The turbulent variation of the plasma density is to be seen in the plasma cross-section. Credit: IPP, A. Banon Navarro

The turbulence model called Gyrokinetic Electromagnetic Numerical Experiment (GENE), developed at Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics (IPP) at Garching, Germany, has proven to be very useful for the theoretical description of turbulence in the plasma of tokamak-type fusion devices. Extended for the more complex geometry of stellarator-type devices, computer simulations with GENE now indicate a new method to reduce plasma turbulence in stellarator plasmas. This could significantly increase the efficiency of a future fusion power plant.


For the fusion researchers at IPP, who want to develop a power plant based on the model of the sun, the turbulence formation in its fuel—a hydrogen plasma—is a central research topic. The small eddies carry particles and heat

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