Can temperature scanning slow COVID-19 spread? Airports are the testing ground for new tech

A camera in the security lines at Dallas Love Field is scanning every passerby for elevated temperatures, in a test by the airport and Southwest Airlines to find out if it can detect sick people before they board flights.

In the back hallways, employees are getting temperature checks at kiosks before they start work each day, trying to keep sick employees out of the airport, too.

As airlines, companies and governments scramble to reopen a battered economy facing the eighth month of a worldwide pandemic, airports are now the frontline for evolving thermal imaging technologies designed to pick out infected travelers before they can spread COVID-19 further.

Temperature scanning device makers such as Dallas-based Wello Inc. and Beaumont’s Infared Cameras Inc. have suddenly been inundated with requests for their technology. Even small restaurants, hotels and schools are asking about it.

“It’s not just convention centers and airlines,” said Gary Strahan,

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Can thermal cameras slow COVID-19 spread? Airports are the testing ground for new tech

A camera in the security lines at Dallas Love Field is scanning every passerby for elevated temperatures, in a test by the airport and Southwest Airlines to find out if it can detect sick people before they board flights.

In the back hallways, employees are getting temperature checks at kiosks before they start work each day, trying to keep sick employees out of the airport, too.

As airlines, companies and governments scramble to reopen a battered economy facing the eighth month of a worldwide pandemic, airports are now the frontline for evolving thermal imaging technologies designed to pick out infected travelers before they can spread COVID-19 further.

Thermal camera makers such as Dallas-based Wello Inc. and Beaumont’s Infared Cameras Inc. have suddenly been inundated with requests for their technology. Even small restaurants, hotels and schools are asking about it.

“It’s not just convention centers and airlines,” said Gary Strahan, CEO

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North Korea scientists criticize Oracle’s database system as slow, costly

Oct. 7 (UPI) — North Korean engineers gave Oracle’s database management system low marks in a research paper published by Pyongyang’s Kim Il Sung University, according to a South Korean press report.

NK Economy reported Wednesday the second issue of Volume 66 of
an academic journal of geo-environmental studies from the university included a paper about “indexing for constructing a large-scale panorama image database management system.”

North Korean researchers wrote that “database management systems such as those of Oracle take a great deal of time” to process and store large amounts of data.

“It’s time consuming, it’s expensive and impossible to search for [storage] space.”

North Korean engineers also claimed they researched methods of storing and managing image data using file indexing and basic search methods. The paper compared the North Korean method to those of Oracle. The North Korean method of data management “cut processing time by about half,”

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Nobel Prizes and COVID-19: Slow, basic science may pay off

Slow and steady success in science has made researchers hopeful in the fight against the pandemic. It even offers a glimmer of climate optimism.

Many years of advances in basic molecular science, some of them already Nobel Prize-winning, have given the world tools for fast virus identification and speeded up the development of testing. And now they tantalize us with the prospect of COVID-19 treatments and ultimately a vaccine, perhaps within a few months.

“This could be science’s finest hour. This could be the time when we deliver, not just for the nation but the world, the miracle that will save us,” said geophysicist Marcia McNutt, president of the National Academy of Sciences.

The coronavirus was sequenced in a matter of weeks, testing became available quickly, and vaccines that would normally take years may be developed in a year or less, and “it’s all been built on the back of

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Slow, basic science may pay off

While the world wants flashy quick fixes for everything, especially massive threats like the coronavirus and global warming, next week’s Nobel Prizes remind us that in science, slow and steady pays off.

It may soon do so again.

Science builds upon previous work, with thinkers “standing on the shoulders of giants,” as Isaac Newton put it, and it starts with basic research aimed at understanding a problem before fixing it. It’s that type of basic science that the Nobels usually reward, often years or decades after a discovery, because it can take that long to realize the implications.

Slow and steady success in science has made researchers hopeful in the fight against the pandemic. It even offers a glimmer of climate optimism.


Many years of advances in basic molecular science, some of them already Nobel Prize-winning, have given the world tools for fast virus identification and speeded up the development

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UCSF Launches Pilot of Privacy-Preserving Smartphone Tool to Help Slow Spread of COVID-19

woman wearing a mask and looking at a cellphone

UC San Francisco is piloting the use of California COVID Notify, a smartphone-based tool that allows users to opt-in to receive an alert if they’ve had a high-risk exposure to COVID-19.

Starting Sept. 30, students, faculty and staff at UCSF will be invited to activate COVID Notify on their smartphones. Those who opt in will be among the first Californians to test the tool as part of a limited pilot that will help policymakers decide whether to make COVID Notify available statewide.

“We’re hoping to find out if exposure notification tools like COVID Notify can supplement the essential work being done every day by human contact tracers,” said Robert Kosnik, MD, director of the UCSF Occupational Health Program, which is overseeing the rollout of the tool at UCSF. “If the pilot succeeds, it may lead to widespread adoption of COVID Notify, providing Californians with a convenient tool that may help

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Amazon’s hardware alarms privacy skeptics, but it won’t slow adoption

  • Amazon announced a series of security-centric devices at its annual hardware event.
  • Though several of the devices were met with skepticism over privacy,  it won’t change the trajectory of adoption.
  • Insider Intelligence publishes hundreds of insights, charts, and forecasts on the Connectivity & Tech industry with the Connectivity & Tech Briefing. You can learn more about subscribing here.

Amazon held its annual fall hardware event last week, and one of the central themes was smart home security. For instance, Amazon unveiled the Ring Always Home Cam, a $250 autonomous drone camera that flies around a user’s home if their Ring security system is triggered.

Amazon Ring Hardware

Amazon’s new hardware alarms privacy skeptics, but it won’t slow adoption.

Business Insider Intelligence


It also announced a $200 Ring-branded Car Cam that monitors for attempted vehicle break-ins and notifies the user of any unusual behavior. To address concerns over the transfer of users’ data, Amazon

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How Facebook Can Slow QAnon for Real

This article is part of the On Tech newsletter. You can sign up here to receive it weekdays.

Like other dangerous ideas, the QAnon conspiracy is tricky to root out online. But it’s not impossible.

QAnon is a sprawling and false set of theories that powerful institutions are controlled by pedophile cannibals who are plotting against President Trump. It’s also a chameleon. Supporters use legitimate causes like protecting children or promoting wellness to appeal to newcomers and then draw them into their outlandish ideas.

QAnon adherents tailored their ideas for Facebook, which moved slowly to address the movement at first. Facebook announced in August that it was restricting QAnon activity, but so far its actions haven’t accomplished much, my colleagues Sheera Frenkel and Tiffany Hsu wrote.

I talked with Sheera about how much blame Facebook deserves for the spread of this dangerous conspiracy, and what we can learn from internet

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