Astronomers solve dark matter puzzle of strange galaxy — ScienceDaily

At present, the formation of galaxies is difficult to understand without the presence of a ubiquitous, but mysterious component, termed dark matter. Astronomers have measure how much dark matter there is around galaxies, and have found that it varies between 10 and 300 times the quantity of visible matter. However, a few years ago, the discovery of a very diffuse object, named Dragonfly 44, changed this view. It was found that this galaxy has 10,000 times more dark matter than the stars. Taken back by this finding, astronomers have made efforts to see whether this object is really anomalous, or whether something went wrong in the analysis of the observations. Now we have the answer.

An international team led by the Kapteyn Institute of the University of Groningen (the Netherlands), with participation by the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) and the University of La Laguna (ULL), has found that

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Geologists solve puzzle that could predict valuable rare earth element deposits

Geologists solve puzzle that could predict valuable rare earth element deposits
Pioneering new research has helped geologists solve a long-standing puzzle that could help pinpoint new, untapped concentrations of some the most valuable rare earth deposits. Credit: Michael Anenburg, ANU.

Pioneering new research has helped geologists solve a long-standing puzzle that could help pinpoint new, untapped concentrations of some the most valuable rare earth deposits.


A team of geologists, led by Professor Frances Wall from the Camborne School of Mines, have discovered a new hypothesis to predict where rare earth elements neodymium and dysprosium could be found.

The elements are among the most sought after, because they are an essential part of digital and clean energy manufacturing, including magnets in large wind turbines and electric cars motors.

For the new research, scientists conducted a series of experiments that showed sodium and potassium—rather than chlorine or fluorine as previously thought—were the key ingredients for making these rare earth elements soluble.

This is

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Geologists solve puzzle that could predict valuable rare earth element deposits — ScienceDaily

Pioneering new research has helped geologists solve a long-standing puzzle that could help pinpoint new, untapped concentrations of some the most valuable rare earth deposits.

A team of geologists, led by Professor Frances Wall from the Camborne School of Mines, have discovered a new hypothesis to predict where rare earth elements neodymium and dysprosium could be found.

The elements are among the most sought after, because they are an essential part of digital and clean energy manufacturing, including magnets in large wind turbines and electric cars motors.

For the new research, scientists conducted a series of experiments that showed sodium and potassium — rather than chlorine or fluorine as previously thought — were the key ingredients for making these rare earth elements soluble.

This is crucial as it determines whether they crystalise — making them fit for extraction — or stayed dissolved in fluids.

The experiments could therefore allow geologists

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Nvidia thinks it can solve video-calling’s greatest challenges

  • Nvidia has released its Maxine developer platform to improve video calls.
  • The platform enables face alignment and eye correction for more natural conversations.
  • Other supported features include dramatic bandwidth savings and video upscaling.

The COVID-19 pandemic means that video-calling has become more important than ever, as companies hold virtual meetings, schools hold online classes, and families connect over the internet in lieu of physical visits.

This widespread shift to video calling has laid bare a few major challenges for the tech, and Nvidia has now announced a solution in the form of its Maxine developer platform (h/t: The Verge).

According to the graphics colossus, Maxine is a suite of video conferencing software powered by Nvidia GPUs in the cloud. And the list of enhancements is pretty intriguing for the most part.

A more natural video-chat experience

The first two major features made possible by Nvidia’s Maxine are gaze correction

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Neuromorphic computing could solve the tech industry’s looming crisis

What’s the best computer in the world? The most souped-up, high-end gaming rig? Whatever supercomputer took the number one spot in the TOP500 this year? The kit inside the datacentres that Apple or Microsoft rely on? Nope: it’s the one inside your skull. 

As computers go, brains are way ahead of the competition. They’re small, lightweight, have low energy consumption, and are amazingly adaptable. And they’re also set to be the model for the next wave of advanced computing.

These brain-inspired designs are known collectively as ‘neuromorphic computing’. Even the most advanced computers don’t come close to the human brain — or even most mammal brains — but our grey matter can give engineers and developers a few pointers on how to make computing infrastrastructure more efficient, by mimicking the brain’s own synapses and neurones.

SEE: Building the bionic brain (free PDF) (TechRepublic)

First, the biology. Neurones are nerve cells,

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Rackspace Technology and Cloud Security Leader, Armor, Announce The New Cybersecurity Landscape Solve Strategy Series Webinar

SAN ANTONIO, Oct. 01, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Rackspace Technology™ (NASDAQ: RXT), a leading end-to-end multicloud technology solutions company, will co-sponsor The New Cybersecurity Landscape virtual event with Armor® on October 7th at 10:00 am CT as part of the company’s Solve Strategy Series. From Zoom bombing to account takeovers, through access mining and phishing, the event will shed light on emerging security threats and empower viewers with practical ideas on how to build a safer future.

Keren Elazari, TED speaker, security analyst, and friendly hacker, will deliver a keynote on how security challenges have changed in the age of COVID-19. She will then be joined by cybersecurity experts from Plus500™, Armor, and Rackspace Technology for a panel discussion on what has changed in the cybersecurity landscape and what businesses must do to adapt.

“This pandemic has been a renaissance for bad actors in the cybersecurity space,” said

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Women Use Tech To Solve Women’s Health Problems, A Market Men Ignore

Amanda French, co-founder & CEO at Emme, is applying her medical device development background to solve the oral contraceptives’ missed pill problem. After three years of building and testing its Bluetooth-enabled “smart case,” which works with more than 100 birth control brands, it has launched. 

When you miss taking a pill, the app automatically sends user-customized reminders. It notifies at-risk users when back-up contraception is needed. The app also allows users to track symptoms in the categories of “mood, body, sex, and flow” related to their menstrual cycles or hormones. When you track symptoms, you can see patterns as they pertain to pill habits. The data can be used to understand the effects specific birth control pills have on hormonal issues and help women and their doctors find the right pill in the right dose. But, like many female founders

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Springbuk Wins 2020 HR Tech Award Based on Ability to Solve Real Business Problems

INDIANAPOLIS, Sept. 22, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Springbuk, a health intelligence software company, today announced the company has won a 2020 HR Technology Award for Best Innovative or Emerging Tech Solution in the Core HR/Workforce category based on its differentiated solution and ability to solve real business problems.

Ben Eubanks announced the award winners on the HR Technology Awards website. In the announcement video, Eubanks cited the Springbuk solution’s ability to identify COVID-19 risk factors in the workforce and its ability to show analytics on healthcare interventions and the business impacts of those interventions as standout features.

“Knowing the real impact of wellness and well-being initiatives has been elusive and Springbuk allows you to actually see the impact, what’s solving a problem, and how it’s doing that,” said Ben Eubanks, founder of the HR Technology Awards. “Springbuk’s Health Intelligence platform goes beyond just wellness and well-being to provide

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Burping cows are fueling the climate crisis. Could seaweed solve the problem?

Cows produce beef, milk — and a lot of methane.



a close up of a cow: Beef cattle stand in a barn at a feedlot owned by Jamie Willrett in Malta, Illinois, U.S., on Tuesday, April 5, 2011. Cattle fell the most in three weeks yesterday on speculation that demand from U.S. processors may ease after a rally to a record. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images


© Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images
Beef cattle stand in a barn at a feedlot owned by Jamie Willrett in Malta, Illinois, U.S., on Tuesday, April 5, 2011. Cattle fell the most in three weeks yesterday on speculation that demand from U.S. processors may ease after a rally to a record. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A byproduct of digestion, methane is produced from both ends of the animals, although over 90% enters the atmosphere via their burps.

And that’s a problem, because methane is a potent greenhouse gas, which traps 28 times more heat than carbon dioxide over 100 years.

As the world’s appetite for beef has grown over the last two decades, annual methane emissions have risen 9% a year. According to the FAO, cattle are responsible for nearly 10% of greenhouse gases generated worldwide by human activity.



a close up of a pile of hay: This seaweed could help lower methane emissions.


©

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