Stanford Pair Win Nobel For Economic Ideas Driving Ebay, Cellphone Spectrum Sales

by Erik Sherman

Going once, going twice—the winners of this year’s Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences are two Stanford economists whose work lets the world make mobile phone calls, switch on a light, and buy and sell on eBay.

Robert Wilson and Paul Milgrom, are famous for their groundbreaking work on auction theory. They took the 2,500-year-old practice of selling goods to the highest bidder and transformed how they worked and how the world looked at a result.

One of the major areas they developed was analysis of how the rules that govern auctions affect the efficiency of the outcomes—how bidders get the value they want, sellers maximize their income, and the process can happen more easily and quickly. Then they found ways to move beyond the fast-talking and gavel-banging stereotype of an auction and into many new types that new rules could enable.

“Sometimes the invisible hand of the

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Spectrum Health completes 200th diagnostic procedure for lung conditions using robotic technology

GRAND RAPIDS, MI — Spectrum Health physicians recently completed their 200th procedure using robotic technology to diagnose early-stage lung cancers, officials say.

The integrated health system’s use of a robotic bronchoscopy platform has resulted in the diagnosis of 20 percent more cases, according to an Oct. 12 news release. This improves patient outcomes by providing access to earlier treatment options with more accuracy.

Two years ago, Spectrum Health introduced Auris Health’s Monarch Platform, an innovative endoscopy tool. More recently, physicians have combined this with Phillips’ Cone Beam CT technology and augmented fluoroscopy to help diagnose with high precision.

“We are equipped with the two leading technologies in the market. By combining these two highly innovative technologies it will allow us to reach any area of concern with unprecedented accuracy,” said Dr. Gustavo Cumbo-Nacheli, director of bronchoscopy and interventional pulmonology for Spectrum Health.

“Soon we will have the ability not only

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CRFS Announce World’s First Rugged 40GHz Spectrum Monitoring Receiver

CRFS, a global leader in RF spectrum monitoring, management, and geolocation solutions, has created the world’s first rugged, high-performance 40GHz RF receiver, the RFeye Node 100-40.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20200924005704/en/

Rugged 40GHz RF receiver inside a weather proof enclosure (Graphic: Business Wire)

Users of the RF spectrum are looking at higher frequencies to address the ever-increasing demands on congested data and communications networks. Previously, frequencies over 18GHz have been under-utilized, but now 20, 30 and even 40GHz are being used. With a 40GHz frequency range and 100MHz instantaneous bandwidth, the RFeye Node 100-40 answers the needs of customers who are looking to monitor these higher frequencies, not just in the test lab, but in the real world.

“Having an RF receiver that is capable of picking up signals from 9kHz to 40GHz is essential for many customers looking at future spectrum usage, in

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T-Mobile amassed “unprecedented concentration of spectrum,” AT&T complains

A bird sits on top of a T-Mobile sign outside a mobile phone store,
Enlarge / A pigeon rests on a T-Mobile logo outside a mobile phone store, operated by Deutsche Telekom AG, in Munich, Germany, on Monday, Feb. 6, 2017.

AT&T and Verizon are worried about T-Mobile’s vast spectrum holdings and have asked the Federal Communications Commission to impose limits on the carrier’s ability to obtain more spectrum licenses. Verizon kicked things off in August when it petitioned the FCC to reconsider its acceptance of a new lease that would give T-Mobile another 10MHz to 30MHz of spectrum in the 600MHz band in 204 counties. AT&T followed that up on Friday with a filing that supports many of the points made in Verizon’s petition.

T-Mobile was once the smallest of four national carriers and complained that it didn’t have enough low-band spectrum to match AT&T and Verizon’s superior coverage. But T-Mobile surged past Sprint in recent years and then bought the company, making

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