Hair loss might be prevented by regulating stem cell metabolism — ScienceDaily

Hair follicle stem cells, which promote hair growth, can prolong their life by switching their metabolic state. In experiments conducted with mice, a research group active in Helsinki and Cologne, Germany, has demonstrated that a protein called Rictor holds a key role in the process.

The study was published in the Cell Metabolism journal.

Mechanisms that regulate stem cells

Ultraviolet radiation and other environmental factors damage our skin and other tissues every day, with the body continuously removing and renewing the damaged tissue. On average, humans shed daily 500 million cells and a quantity of hairs weighing a total of 1.5 grams.

The dead material is replaced by specialised stem cells that promote tissue growth. Tissue function is dependent on the activity and health of these stem cells, as impaired activity results in the ageing of the tissues.

“Although the critical role of stem cells in ageing is established, little

Read More

Families Celebrate a Spooky Science & STEM Halloween

This post was contributed by a community member. The views expressed here are the author’s own.

The Cradle of Aviation Museum’s annual Family Science Nights return with the beloved “Spooky Science Night” with two socially-distant and limited attendance family sessions on Friday, October 30th at 5pm and 7pm. Each session is packed with stimulating family-fun, STEM activities and a Halloween parade to entertain the entire family. Tickets are $15.00 per person; $10 for Museum Members. All activities are included with admission. All tickets must be purchased in advance, no tickets will be sold at the door. Ideal for kids in grades K-5. Info is available at www.cradleofaviation.org/spook…

Activities include:

● Frankenstein Hands: Use your mad scientist skills to dissect frozen hands to discover what is trapped inside.

● Candy Catapults: Protecting your Halloween hoard is serious business. Construct and test your own catapults.

● Boo-Be-Gones: You ain’t afraid of

Read More

This new program wants to prepare teens for careers in STEM via science and storytelling

A new program is looking to prepare teens for careers in STEM.

Rockville, Maryland-based technology and engineering solution provider Acquired Data Solutions (ADS) partnered with Edge of Yesterday Media (EOY Media), a teen time travel novel series curator, to launch the MASTERY program, a virtual learning program teaching young people tech skills via an interactive platform. MASTERY is an acronym that highlights essential skills and topics: mindset, arts, storytelling, technology, economy, economy, reflection and you.

The companies partnered to launch MASTERY following this past summer’s On-Ramps to Careers internship program when they discovered their shared passion for working with young adults preparing to transition from high school to college and eventually full-time jobs, per a press release. ADS hosted 40 students for the internship program and developed a curriculum based on concepts like technology, economics, arts, marketing and socializing for successful career paths.

During the MASTERY program, ADS will

Read More

With New STEM MBA Path, Foster Puts Out Welcome Mat For Foreign Students

The University of Washington Foster School of Business is adding a STEM pathway to its MBA program. UW photo

Most top-25 schools that added or extended application rounds this year in response to the coronavirus pandemic saw big benefits in the form of increased MBA applications; many parlayed the deeper talent pool into bigger classes. Not so at the University of Washington’s Foster School of Business in Seattle. Though the Foster School did add a fourth round this year extending more than two months from March 17 to May 19, the app windfall never arrived: Foster’s app total for the cycle was 833, three fewer than it received in 2018-2019.

The decline, minor though it was, continued a slump for Washington Foster that began in the 2017-2018 cycle, when the school saw its MBA applications drop from a record 1,038 to 934. Counting this year’s backward movement, the Foster School

Read More

The Leadership, focusing on women in STEM, is a timely documentary that avoids answering the big questions. | The Canberra Times

whats-on, music-theatre-arts, The Leadership, film review

The Leadership (M, 97 minutes) 3 stars Taking a group of professional women on a three-week cruise combined with a leadership workshop was an inspired idea. No doubt about it. The trip to the exquisite, endangered wilderness of Antarctica would be a reminder of what science was fighting for. The journey would offer a fundamental reset for the participants who had been selected from the fields of science, engineering, technology, mathematics (STEM) and medicine. It was designed to help them become the sort of the leaders they “hoped to be”, honing the skills necessary for contributing to meaningful and necessary policy change around the world. Course leader Fabian Dattner had lofty hopes that were even underpinned by a great quote from poet T. S. Eliot. The prominent businesswoman, leadership consultant, and self-described dreamer has a background in corporate consultancy. No doubt the women participating,

Read More

Samsung partners with UM to boost STEM education



Wang Yang holding a sign posing for the camera: Datuk Roh Jae Yeol.


© Provided by New Straits Times
Datuk Roh Jae Yeol.

SAMSUNG, in its effort to help promote the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) education in the country, has partnered with Universiti Malaya (UM) for the Solve for Tomorrow competition.

The initiative is aimed at fostering innovative thinking, creative problem-solving and teamwork, and it is carried out in partnership with UM’s STEM Centre.

The competition is open to Form 1 and Form 2 students from participating secondary schools that Universiti Malaya STEM Centre regularly engages with to provide various STEM activities, helping them enhance their learning experience.

The Solve for Tomorrow competition kicks off today (Oct 9, 2020) and ends on Dec 8, 2020 with the announcement of winners.

According to Samsung Malaysia Electronics’ president, Yoonsoo Kim, it is important for the next generations to come to be equipped with the fundamental skills, knowledge and attitudes needed to adapt to

Read More

Stem cell sheets harvested in just two days — ScienceDaily

Stem cells are cell factories that constantly divide themselves to create new cells. Implanting stem cells in damaged organs can regenerate new tissues. Cell sheet engineering, which allows stem cells to be transplanted into damaged areas in the form of sheets made up of only cells, completely eliminates immune rejection caused by external substances and encourages tissue regeneration. A research team led by POSTECH recently succeeded in drastically reducing the harvest period of such stem cell sheets.

A joint research team comprised of Professor Dong Sung Kim and researcher Andrew Choi of POSTECH’s Department of Mechanical Engineering and Dr. InHyeok Rhyou and Dr. Ji-Ho Lee of the Department of Orthopedic Surgery at Pohang Semyung Christianity Hospital has significantly reduced the total harvest period of a stem cell sheet to two days. The nanotopography of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), which abruptly changes its roughness depending on temperature, allows harvesting of cell sheets that

Read More

Vernier Software & Technology Launches a New Sensor to Support the Development of STEM Skills and Environmental Literacy | News

BEAVERTON, Ore., Oct. 7, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Vernier recently launched the new Go Direct® Weather System to engage students in hands-on data collection as they learn important environmental science concepts. This affordable wireless sensor can be used in the classroom or out in the field to help middle school, high school, and college-level students investigate and analyze a variety of environmental factors.

“This new sensor for environmental science provides an affordable way for STEM educators to engage their students in data collection as they explore the science of natural phenomena,” said John Wheeler, CEO of Vernier Software & Technology. “The Go Direct Weather System is notable because students can collect and analyze multiple types of environmental data using just one compact system.”

The two-part Go Direct Weather System consists of the Go Direct Weather sensor and the Go Direct Weather Vane. The handheld weather sensor is used

Read More

Vernier Software & Technology Launches a New Sensor to Support the Development of STEM Skills and Environmental Literacy

BEAVERTON, Ore., Oct. 7, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Vernier recently launched the new Go Direct® Weather System to engage students in hands-on data collection as they learn important environmental science concepts. This affordable wireless sensor can be used in the classroom or out in the field to help middle school, high school, and college-level students investigate and analyze a variety of environmental factors.

“This new sensor for environmental science provides an affordable way for STEM educators to engage their students in data collection as they explore the science of natural phenomena,” said John Wheeler, CEO of Vernier Software & Technology. “The Go Direct Weather System is notable because students can collect and analyze multiple types of environmental data using just one compact system.”

The two-part Go Direct Weather System consists of the Go Direct Weather sensor and the Go Direct Weather Vane. The handheld weather sensor is used

Read More

Human intestinal organoids grown from stem cells used to model congenital disorder in babies — ScienceDaily

Scientists at Cincinnati Children’s used human intestinal organoids grown from stem cells to discover how our bodies control the absorption of nutrients from the food we eat. They further found that one hormone might be able to reverse a congenital disorder in babies who cannot adequately absorb nutrients and need intravenous feeding to survive.

Heather A. McCauley, PhD, a research associate at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, found that the hormone peptide YY, also called PYY, can reverse congenital malabsorption in mice. With a single PYY injection per day, 80% of the mice survived. Normally, only 20% to 30% survive.

This indicates PYY might be a possible therapeutic for people with severe malabsorption.

Poor absorption of macronutrients is a global health concern, underlying ailments such as malnutrition, intestinal infections and short-gut syndrome. So, identification of factors regulating nutrient absorption has significant therapeutic potential, the researchers noted.

McCauley was lead author

Read More