NASA animation tracks the end of Tropical Storm Delta

NASA animation tracks the end of Tropical Storm Delta  
NASA’s Terra satellite provided a visible image to forecasters of Tropical Storm Delta moving through the southeastern U.S. on Oct. 11 at 1:30 p.m. EDT. At the time of the image, the storm was centered over northern Alabama. Credit: NASA Worldview, Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS).

NASA’s Terra satellite obtained visible imagery as Tropical Storm Delta made landfall in Louisiana and moved northeastward soaking the U.S. southeast and Mid-Atlantic states.


NASA satellite view: Delta’s organization

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA’s Terra satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Delta on Oct. 11 at 1:30 p.m. EDT. The storm still appeared circular in imagery. At the time, it was centered over northern Alabama. At the time Terra passed overhead, Delta had weakened to a tropical depression with maximum sustained winds near 25 mph (35 kph).

Visible imagery from NASA’s Terra

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U.S. Department Of Justice Reveals Growing Bitcoin And Crypto National Security Threat Could Herald ‘Oncoming Storm’

Bitcoin and cryptocurrency use by terrorists, rogue nations and other criminals has grown in recent years—with high-profile attacks drawing international attention.

The illicit use of bitcoin and cryptocurrency ranges from money laundering and tax evasion to extortion, with cyber criminals increasingly demanding bitcoin and crypto payments in ransomware attacks on computer systems.

Now, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) has warned the emergence of bitcoin and similar cryptocurrencies is a growing threat to U.S. national security, with the attorney general William Barr’s Cyber-Digital Task Force calling it the “first raindrops of an oncoming storm.”

MORE FROM FORBESNeither Trump Nor Biden Will Help The U.S. Dollar, Warns Early Facebook Exec-Calls Bitcoin An ‘Insurance Policy’

“Current terrorist use of cryptocurrency may represent the first raindrops of

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A new 3D model could explain the formation of a hexagon storm on Saturn — ScienceDaily

With its dazzling system of icy rings, Saturn has been a subject of fascination since ancient times. Even now the sixth planet from the sun holds many mysteries, partly because its distance away makes direct observation difficult and partly because this gas giant (which is multiple times the size of our planet) has a composition and atmosphere, mostly hydrogen and helium, so unlike that of Earth. Learning more about it could yield some insights into the creation of the solar system itself.

One of Saturn’s mysteries involves the massive storm in the shape of a hexagon at its north pole. The six-sided vortex is an atmospheric phenomenon that has been fascinating planetary scientists since its discovery in the 1980s by the American Voyager program, and the subsequent visit in 2006 by the U.S.-European Cassini-Huygens mission. The storm is about 20,000 miles in diameter and is bordered by bands of winds

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NASA imagery reveals Tropical Storm Chan-hom’s skewed structure

NASA imagery reveals Tropical Storm Chan-hom's skewed structure
On Oct. 5, 2020, NASA’s Terra satellite provided a visible image of Tropical Storm Chan-hom several hundred miles northwest of Guam (lower right). Credit: NASA Worldview, Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS).

NASA’s Terra satellite obtained visible imagery of Tropical Storm Chan-hom as it continued moving though the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. The imagery revealed that the center of circulation was exposed and its strongest storms were south of the center.


Tropical Depression 16W formed on Oct. 4 and strengthened into a tropical storm on Oct 5. Once it reached tropical storm strength, it was re-named Chan-hom. Laos submitted the name Chan-hom to the World Meteorological Organization list. The name is a type of tree in Laos.

NASA satellite view: Chan-hom’s organization

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA’s Terra satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Chan-hom on Oct. 5 that showed

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Tropical Storm Gamma moves inland over Yucatan Peninsula

Oct. 3 (UPI) — Tropical Storm Gamma began moving inland over the Yucatan Peninsula on Saturday morning, less than a day after the storm was named.

Tropical Depression 25 formed late Friday morning amid an area of disturbed weather over the northwestern Caribbean that meteorologists have had their eyes on since the demise of Beta, Sally, Teddy and Paulette. It strengthened to tropical storm status — 40 mph — by Friday evening.

As of 1 p.m. CDT, the tropical storm was moving in a northwestward direction at 9 mph, about 15 miles north-northwest of Tulum, Mexico. Wind speeds had increased to 70 mph.

Mexico’s government has issued tropical storm and hurricane watches and warnings for the region.

Waters offshore of Honduras, Guatemala, Belize and Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula have become increasingly stormy in recent days.

This zone has been experiencing low wind shear relative to the rest of the Atlantic basin.

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Tropical Storm Gamma becomes latest named storm in Atlantic basin

Tropical Storm Gamma became the 24th named storm in the Atlantic basin this season. Previously dubbed Tropical Depression 25, the system’s maximum sustained winds had strengthened to 40 mph by 7 p.m. PDT Friday.

Tropical Depression 25 formed late Friday morning amid an area of disturbed weather over the northwestern Caribbean that meteorologists have had their eyes on since the demise of Beta, Sally, Teddy and Paulette. The system had initially been dubbed Invest 91L by the National Hurricane Center (NHC).

As of Friday evening, the tropical storm was moving in a northwestward direction at 9 mph, about 135 miles south-southeast of Cozumel, Mexico.

Mexico’s government has issued a tropical storm warning for the country’s Yucatan Peninsula from the coastal communities of Punta Herrero to Cabo Catoche. A tropical storm watch has been issued for areas south of Punta Herrero to Puerto Costa Maya and west of Cabo Catoche to

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2012 Solar Storm Could Have Been More Extreme: Here’s How

KEY POINTS

  • In 2012, an extreme solar storm nearly hit the Earth
  • Researchers studying the event said it could have been more extreme if paired with another event
  • Researchers demonstrated how two solar storms could interact with each other

Solar storms could become more powerful if they happen quite close to each other, researchers studying the 2012 solar storm have found. 

On July 23, 2012, a solar storm, which NASA describes as the most powerful one in about 150 years, nearly hit the Earth. Had it hit the Earth, it would have caused an economic impact of over $2 trillion and the damages could take years to repair.

The 2012 near-miss has been likened to the 1859 Carrington Event, one of the biggest solar storms on record, that caused auroras as far south as Cuba and Honolulu.

Coronal Mass Ejections (CME) are outbursts of plasma from the sun that

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NASA satellite found Post-Tropical Storm Alpha fizzle over Portugal and Spain

NASA satellite found Post-Tropical Storm Alpha fizzle over Portugal and Spain
On Sept. 19 at 9:35 a.m. EDT (1335 UTC), NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite found the remnants of former Subtropical storm Alpha spread over Portugal and into northwestern Spain. Credit: NASA Worldview, Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS)

Former Subtropical Storm Alpha was a short-lived storm that formed and fizzled within 24 hours. NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite found the remnants of former Subtropical storm Alpha spreading over Portugal and northwestern Spain.


Alpha formed off the coast of Portugal by 12:30 p.m. EDT (1630 UTC) on Friday, Sept. 18. Alpha made landfall in Portugal later that day around 5 p.m. EDT (2100 UTC) about 120 miles (195 km) north-northeast of Lisbon, Portugal.

On Friday, Sept. 18 at 11 p.m. EDT (0300 UTC on Sept. 19), the National Hurricane Center noted that the storm had become a post-tropical cyclone. Post-tropical is a generic term describes a cyclone that no longer possesses

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The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season is so intense, it just ran out of storm names

By Kimberly Wood, Mississippi State University

Here’s how active this year’s Atlantic hurricane season has been: When Tropical Storm Wilfred formed on Sept. 18, the National Hurricane Center exhausted its list of storm names for only the second time since naming began in 1950. A few hours later, the next storm formed – now known as Alpha.

Even more surprising is that we reached the 21st tropical storm of the year more than two weeks earlier than in 2005, the only other time this happened. And the 22nd storm, Alpha, was nearly a month earlier.

The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season is far from over. With the new storm, forecasters shifted from the alphabetical list of people’s names to letters of the Greek alphabet – Alpha, Beta and so on. The 2005 season had six Greek-letter storms, ending with Zeta.

So, why is the Atlantic so active this year? Meteorologists like

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The intense 2020 Atlantic hurricane season used up all the storm names for only the second time since 1950

Here’s how active this year’s Atlantic hurricane season has been: When Tropical Storm Wilfred formed on Sept. 18, the National Hurricane Center exhausted its list of storm names for only the second time since naming began in 1950. Within hours, two more storm had formed — now known as Alpha and Beta.

Even more surprising is that we reached the 23rd tropical storm of the year, Beta, more than a month earlier than in 2005, the only other year on record with so many named storms.

The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season is far from over. With the new storms, forecasters shifted from the alphabetical list of people’s names to letters of the Greek alphabet. The 2005 season had six Greek-letter storms, ending with Zeta.

So, why is the Atlantic so active this year? Meteorologists like myself have been following a few important differences, including many tropical storms forming closer to

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