Kirsten Storms Cannot Believe What Her 6-Year-Old Daughter Is Capable of Doing With a Smartphone

Many parents know that children can be amazing creatures. They often grow up quickly and sometimes pick up new skills at an unbelievable pace.

General Hospital star Kirsten Storms recently had a moment of awe with her 6-year-old daughter, who is now skilled at using a smartphone. Find out what made Storms impressed with her daughter below.

Kirsten Storms
Kirsten Storms | Paul Archuleta/FilmMagic

Kirsten Storms has 1 daughter she shares with her ex

Storms has one child named Harper, whom she shares with her ex-husband, Brandon Barash.

Storms and Barash—a soap actor known for his roles on General Hospital and Days of Our Lives—got married in 2013. They welcomed baby girl Harper in 2014, though the couple decided to call it quits in 2016, citing irreconcilable differences.

Despite the divorce, Storms and Barash still remain on good terms. They co-parent Harper together with both often sharing fun moments with her

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The weather phenomenon behind yesterday’s storms, explained

At its peak, there were more than a quarter of a million power outages across Massachusetts yesterday caused by a strong line of thunderstorms that moved from Ontario, Canada, all the way across southern New England. As the cleanup continues, you might wonder what caused all the tree damage and resulting power outages.

First of all, what occurred yesterday was not a tornado. Tornadoes are a specific wind phenomenon in which the wind is rotating; we did not have any rotation yesterday. What we did see were microbursts. A microburst is just a small downburst that is usually less than 4 kilometers across. You can contrast this with a derecho, another severe wind phenomenon, which is a line of straight-line winds that lasts a longer time and moves across a wider area. One might even argue that yesterday’s line of microbursts was in a sense a derecho, but I will

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NASA infrared imagery reveals wind shear displacing Marie’s strongest storms

NASA infrared imagery reveals wind shear displacing Marie's strongest storms
On Oct.5 at 6:20 a.m. EDT (1020 UTC), the MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite gathered infrared data on Marie that confirmed wind shear was adversely affecting the storm. Persistent westerly vertical wind shear showed strongest storms (yellow) pushed east of the center where cloud top temperatures were as cold as minus 50 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 45.5 Celsius). Credit: NASA/NRL

NASA’s Aqua satellite provided an infrared view of Tropical Storm Marie that revealed the effects of outside winds battering the storm.


Wind shear occurs when winds at different levels of the atmosphere push against the rotating cylinder of winds, weakening the rotation by pushing it apart at different levels.

NASA’s Aqua Satellite Reveals Effects of Wind Shear 

Infrared light is a tool used to analyze the strength of storms in tropical cyclones by providing temperature information about a system’s clouds. The strongest thunderstorms that reach highest into the

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The climate science behind this year’s wildfires and powerful storms

At least 31 have died in the largest wildfires in California history. The east is defending itself against twice the usual number of tropical cyclones. And what may be the highest temperature ever recorded on Earth came in August in the United States. It’s a torrid 2020 and it was forecast 32 years ago. In the 1980’s, a NASA scientist named James Hansen discovered that climate change, driven by carbon emissions, was upon us. His graphs, of three decades ago, accurately traced the global rise in temperature to the year 2020. Last week, we had a lot of questions for Hansen. Are these disasters climate change? Do things get worse? Is it too late to do anything? But before we get to the causes, let us show you the effects.



a couple of people that are standing in front of a sunset: 60-firesarticle0.jpg


© Credit: CBSNews
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Climate scientists on 2020’s wildfires and storms

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UP NEXT

Butte County, California, Volunteer

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Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico areas to watch for tropical storms

Historically, hurricane season peaks about Sept. 10, activity typically in top gear leading into October. But this year’s hyperactive September came screeching to a halt Friday, when Teddy and Beta in the Atlantic and Lowell in the Pacific fizzled or lost tropical characteristics entirely. Since then, the world’s oceans have been virtually silent. But they won’t be for long.

A large zone of rising air at mid-to-upper levels of the atmosphere will soon overspread the Atlantic from the west, at the same time as global circulations favor an uptick in shower and thunderstorm activity. The two factors could overlap to bring about a renewal in tropical busyness.

An area to watch

The National Hurricane Center is already monitoring one area in the northwest Caribbean that could prove problematic in the coming week. The center estimates a 50-percent chance that tropical development will occur sometime in the next five days.

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Northern Lights Possible Over U.S. This Week As Strong Geomagnetic Storms Predicted, Say Scientists

Have you ever seen the Northern Lights? If you live in northern U.S. states near the Canadian border then the night skies could play host to the sky phenomenon—also called the aurora borealis—at around midnight local time on Monday and later in the week, too.

In the wake of the Sun “waking-up” there have been reports of strong displays of aurora in the night sky in recent weeks, but so far they’ve been confined to the Arctic Circle.

However, the latest predictions from the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center (NOAA SWPC) suggest high activity is coming this week that could mean aurora borealis being visible as far south as Oregon.

Whether anyone sees them depends not only on “space weather,” but also on local weather since heavy cloud will preclude any sightings.

Where

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Solving the strange storms on Jupiter — ScienceDaily

At the south pole of Jupiter lurks a striking sight — even for a gas giant planet covered in colorful bands that sports a red spot larger than the earth. Down near the south pole of the planet, mostly hidden from the prying eyes of humans, is a collection of swirling storms arranged in an unusually geometric pattern.

Since they were first spotted by NASA’s Juno space probe in 2019, the storms have presented something of a mystery to scientists. The storms are analogous to hurricanes on Earth. However, on our planet, hurricanes do not gather themselves at the poles and twirl around each other in the shape of a pentagon or hexagon, as do Jupiter’s curious storms.

Now, a research team working in the lab of Andy Ingersoll, Caltech professor of planetary science, has discovered why Jupiter’s storms behave so strangely. They did so using math derived from a

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The strange storms on Jupiter

The strange storms on Jupiter
(Click for animation) Under some experimental conditions, and on Jupiter, cyclonic storms repel each other, rather than merging. Credit: California Institute of Technology

At the south pole of Jupiter lurks a striking sight—even for a gas giant planet covered in colorful bands that sports a red spot larger than the earth. Down near the south pole of the planet, mostly hidden from the prying eyes of humans, is a collection of swirling storms arranged in an unusually geometric pattern.


Since they were first spotted by NASA’s Juno space probe in 2019, the storms have presented something of a mystery to scientists. The storms are analogous to hurricanes on Earth. However, on our planet, hurricanes do not gather themselves at the poles and twirl around each other in the shape of a pentagon or hexagon, as do Jupiter’s curious storms.

Now, a research team working in the lab of Andy Ingersoll,

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Apple chief says fires and storms show impact of climate change

Apple chief Tim Cook said Monday he views the recent increase in fires, hurricanes and floods as strong proof that climate change is real.

The disasters should sway those denying science that shows greenhouse gases are dangerously changing weather patterns, Cook said in a talk streamed during an online event by The Atlantic magazine.

Cook reasoned that wildfires raging on the US West Coast, hurricanes slamming the South, and flooding in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic regions make a compelling case for climate change.

“All of these together, I do believe will convince the people that are not currently convinced about climate change,” Cook said.

His remote interview with Atlantic editor-in-chief Jeffrey Goldberg was recorded last week, when smoke from wildfires turned day to night in California and ash fell like snow in some places.

“It’s horrendous,” Cook said.

“It’s a reminder of how serious climate change is and what’s at

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