2021 Honda Accord reveal: Fresh style, more tech but no manual gearbox

Bigger grilles are all the rage.


Honda

One of Roadshow’s favorite family sedans is getting a freshened look and a brace of new equipment. The 2021 Honda Accord bowed on Monday with slightly tweaked styling, more tech and a new trim level that will surely appeal to those shopping the popular Accord Sport variant. All in all, the updates should be much appreciated by those still interested in a vehicle with four doors and a trunk.

Every Accord trim gets a redesigned, wider grille that incorporates some new horizontal pieces to emphasize width. It’s definitely not a huge change, but it helps the Honda Sensing suite of driver-assist tech work even better, according to the automaker. LED headlights are also standard on Accord Sport and above, though those shopping the Accord Hybrid will need to splurge for at least the EX trim for the same lighting tech. Every Accord except

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2021 Honda Accord revealed: New style, new tech but no manual transmission

Wider grilles are all the rage.


Honda

One of our favorite midsize sedans here at Roadshow is in for some updates. The 2021 Honda Accord bowed on Monday with slightly tweaked styling, more tech and a new trim level that will surely appeal to those shopping the popular Accord Sport variant. All in all, the updates should be much appreciated by those still interested in a vehicle with four doors and a trunk.

Every Accord trim gets a new, wider grille that incorporates some horizontal pieces to emphasize width. It’s definitely not a huge change, but it helps the Honda Sensing suite of driver-assist tech work even better, according to the automaker. LED headlights are also standard on Accord Sport and above, though those shopping the Accord Hybrid will need to splurge for at least the EX trim for the same lighting tech. Every Accord except the Sport trim gets

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A new, more trusting style of leadership is needed to manage people working from home, says tech exec

  • Tech company Splunk has more than 6,000 staff working from home and has adapted to a more trusting style of leadership.
  • Splunk is training leaders and managers to understand employees’ needs as they work remotely, according to its Chief Technical Adviser James Hodge.
  • Having people work from home also means companies have access to a wider talent pool, Hodge said.

LONDON — When the coronavirus pandemic closed workplaces earlier this year, businesses effectively went from having one or more locations to having as many offices as they did employees, as staff worked from home.

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For software company Splunk, this effectively meant going from 35 offices to more than 6,000 “overnight,” according to the firm’s Chief Technical Adviser James Hodge. Having so many people working at home has meant a more trusting style of leadership is necessary, Hodge told CNBC’s “Squawk Box Europe” on Monday.

“The first few months

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On building better business continuity and preparing for every shift in work style

As discussed in the previous article, work styles are rapidly shifting, and with that comes new challenges in technology enablement; how can organisations properly equip and empower their people to continue working, while also ensuring high levels of productivity and protecting the business’ most sensitive data and assets?

Strategically, organisations need to be thinking about remote work as a “bubble” that moves with them. For example, while Gartner found that 74% of CFOs planned on enabling remote working, the same survey found that it was only around 5% of their workforce that would shift from on-site to permanently remote. Many more would instead become “hybrid” workers, spending some time working remotely, and other times coming into the office. For these people, the ability to work needs to travel with them.

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How to build a modern business around continuity

Dell Technologies is hosting a webcast on remote working and technology strategy,

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TikTok talks show how Trump’s deal-making style can cause collateral damage

  • President Trump initially said only a full sale of TikTok’s U.S. operations would prevent a ban of the application, but he settled on a lesser deal that involved minority stake sales to Oracle and Walmart.
  • If Trump had said in July that he would be willing to accept a more limited deal, Microsoft may have won the deal and TikTok CEO Kevin Mayer may still be running the company.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: U.S. President Donald Trump faces reporters as he departs for campaign travel to Ohio from the South Lawn at the White House in Washington, September 21, 2020.


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U.S. President Donald Trump faces reporters as he departs for campaign travel to Ohio from the South Lawn at the White House in Washington, September 21, 2020.

Maybe the simplest way to think about what’s happening with TikTok is collateral damage.

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The Trump administration has used technology companies as a battleground for geopolitical warfare with China. It blocked Broadcom’s attempt at buying Qualcomm in 2018 over arrangements with “third party foreign entities.” It banned U.S.

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