COVID-19 can survive on phone screens for 28 days in the dark, study suggests



a hand holding a cell phone: Crystal Cox/Business Insider


© Crystal Cox/Business Insider
Crystal Cox/Business Insider

  • Research from Australia’s national science agency suggests that the COVID-19 virus can survive on smooth surfaces for 28 days at room temperature.
  • The study tested the virus on glass mobile phone screens, plastic and paper banknotes, and stainless steel.
  • Researchers kept these surfaces in the dark during the study. UV light has been shown to kill COVID-19.
  • Previous studies have suggested the virus lingers on these surfaces for seven days or less.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The COVID-19 virus can survive on phone screens for 28 days under laboratory conditions, longer than previously thought, new research from the Australian government’s science agency has found. 

Researchers tested the virus on smooth surfaces such as glass phone screens and paper banknotes. They kept them in the dark at room temperature, around 20 degrees Celsius (68 degrees Fahrenheit).

They found the virus could

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Study Suggests A Supernova Exploded Near Earth About 2.5 Million Years Ago, Possibly Causing An Extinction Event

Supernovas are amazingly bright explosions of massive stars at the end of their lives. During the gravitational collapse, the outer layers of the star are pushed away, and chemical elements formed inside the star are released into space. This cosmic dust rains down onto the Earth continuously, including exotic elements formed inside the dying star.

Research published in the journal Physical Review Letters used the concentration of two such exotic elements preserved in ocean sediments to hypothesize that a supernova exploded near Earth just 2.5 million years ago.

The authors, led by Dr. Gunther Korschinek from the Technical University of Munich, focused their study on ferromanganese crusts collected in the Pacific Ocean.

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New research suggests innovative method to analyse the densest star systems in the Universe

New research suggests innovative method to analyse the densest star systems in the Universe
Artist’s illustration of supernova remnant Credit: Pixabay

In a recently published study, a team of researchers led by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Gravitational Wave Discovery (OzGrav) at Monash university suggests an innovative method to analyse gravitational waves from neutron star mergers, where two stars are distinguished by type (rather than mass), depending on how fast they’re spinning.


Neutron stars are extremely dense stellar objects that form when giant stars explode and die—in the explosion, their cores collapse, and the protons and electrons melt into each other to form a remnant neutron star.

In 2017, the merging of two neutron stars, called GW170817, was first observed by the LIGO and Virgo gravitational-wave detectors. This merger is well-known because scientists were also able to see light produced from it: high-energy gamma rays, visible light, and microwaves. Since then, an average of three scientific studies on GW170817 have been published every

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Study Suggests COVID-19 Can Survive For 28 Days On A Smartphone

In some concerning news, a new study has found that COVID-19 can survive for up to 28 days on a smartphone screen. This news comes from a study in Virology Journal which has reinforced the need for regular cleaning of devices and handwashing in the fight against the disease.

Some smartphone manufactures were alert to the threat of coronavirus surviving on screens before this study released. Samsung recently patented something called ‘Antimicrobial Coating’. The thought is that the company will produce smartphone cases designed to fight the virus.

Additionally, successful tests have been conducted of UV Light-based robots designed to kill coronavirus. These have sold to a number of healthcare settings to try and help combat the disease more effectively.

The new research, however, is still quite worrying. As reported by ZDNet it underlies the importance of maintaining good hygiene habits surrounding surface and device cleaning as the virus continues

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New Theory Suggests Tunguska Explosion Was A 656 Foot-Wide Asteroid’s Near-Miss With Earth

In the morning of June 30, 1908, the ground trembled in Central Siberia, and a series of flying fireballs, causing a “frightful sound” of explosions, were observed in the sky above the Stony Tunguska River. Strange glowing clouds, colorful sunsets, and a weak luminescence in the night were reported as far as Europe.

Likely many thousand people in a radius of 1.500 kilometers (or 900 miles) observed the Tunguska Event. However, due to the remoteness of the affected area, eyewitness testimonies were collected only more than half of a century after the event, and most were second-hand oral accounts. In 2008, unpublished material collected by Russian ethnographer Sev’yan Vainshtein resurfaced, including some first-hand accounts of the event.

Despite its notoriety in pop-culture, hard scientific data covering the Tunguska Event is sparse. Since 1928 more than forty expeditions explored

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A new interpretation of quantum mechanics suggests reality does not depend on the measurer — ScienceDaily

Quantum mechanics arose in the 1920s — and since then scientists have disagreed on how best to interpret it. Many interpretations, including the Copenhagen interpretation presented by Niels Bohr and Werner Heisenberg and in particular von Neumann-Wigner interpretation, state that the consciousness of the person conducting the test affects its result. On the other hand, Karl Popper and Albert Einstein thought that an objective reality exists. Erwin Schrödinger put forward the famous thought experiment involving the fate of an unfortunate cat that aimed to describe the imperfections of quantum mechanics.

In their most recent article, Finnish civil servants Jussi Lindgren and Jukka Liukkonen, who study quantum mechanics in their free time, take a look at the uncertainty principle that was developed by Heisenberg in 1927. According to the traditional interpretation of the principle, location and momentum cannot be determined simultaneously to an arbitrary degree of precision ,as the person conducting

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Mouse study suggests parental response to infant distress is innate but adapts to change — ScienceDaily

A National Institutes of Health study in mice suggests that parents have an innate capacity to respond to an infant’s cries for help and this capacity may serve as a foundation from which a parent learns to adjust to an infant’s changing needs. The study was conducted by Robert C. Froemke, Ph.D., of New York University School of Medicine, and colleagues. It appears in Nature.

When housed with mice who have given birth, unmated female mice will assist with the care of the newborn pups. The researchers evaluated the ability of such babysitter mice to respond to a variety of recorded newborn distress cries. These included typical distress cries as well as a range of cries that had been digitally altered — sped up or slowed down to include more or fewer syllables than typical distress vocalizations.

Experienced babysitters responded to typical distress cries 80% of the time, compared

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Ancient lizard’s long, crocodile-like snout suggests it carved out a niche in a competitive marine ecosystem — ScienceDaily

A new species of an ancient marine reptile evolved to strike terror into the hearts of the normally safe, fast-swimming fish has been identified by a team of University of Alberta researchers, shedding light on what it took to survive in highly competitive ecosystems.

Gavialimimus almaghribensis, a new type of mosasaur, was catalogued and named by an international research team led by master’s student Catie Strong, who performed the research a year ago as part of an undergrad honours thesis guided by vertebrate paleontologist Michael Caldwell, professor in the Faculty of Science, along with collaborators from the University of Cincinnati and Flinders University.

More than a dozen types of mosasaur — which can reach 17 metres in length and resemble an overgrown komodo dragon — ruled over the marine environment in what is now Morocco at the tail end of the Late Cretaceous period between 72 and 66 million

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Study suggests EMFs alter redox signaling to improve insulin sensitivity — ScienceDaily

Researchers from the University of Iowa may have discovered a safe new way to manage blood sugar non-invasively. Exposing diabetic mice to a combination of static electric and magnetic fields for a few hours per day normalizes two major hallmarks of type 2 diabetes, according to new findings published Oct. 6 in Cell Metabolism.

“We’ve built a remote control to manage diabetes,” says Calvin Carter, PhD, one of the study’s lead authors and a postdoc in the lab of senior author Val Sheffield, MD, PhD, professor of pediatrics, and of ophthalmology and visual sciences at the UI Carver College of Medicine. “Exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) for relatively short periods reduces blood sugar and normalizes the body’s response to insulin. The effects are long-lasting, opening the possibility of an EMF therapy that can be applied during sleep to manage diabetes all day.”

The unexpected and surprising discovery may have

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The coronavirus pandemic has increased global trust in science, study suggests

Over the last three years, 3M’s “State of Science” report found that global skepticism of science was increasing — from 29 percent in 2018 to 32 percent in 2019 to 37 percent in 2020. But a more recent survey taken after the coronavirus pandemic began suggests that trend may be reversing.

In the post-pandemic survey, science skepticism dropped back to 28 percent, while trust in science increased to 89 percent, the highest since the study began. And, more specifically, the number of people who only believe in science that aligns with their personal beliefs is down six points since 2019.

The change is seemingly linked to COVID-19, which has increased the presence of science in people’s lives. Since the 2018 survey, the number of people who agreed that science is very important to their everyday life increased 12 points to 54 percent in the most recent survey, and the same

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