Tardigrades survive deadly radiation by glowing in the dark

Tardigrade
This tardigrade uses fluorescence to resist lethal UV radiation

Harikumar R Suma & Sandeep M Eswarappa

A tiny tardigrade can survive intense ultraviolet radiation for an hour by glowing in the dark. “It acts like a shield,” says Sandeep Eswarappa at the Indian Institute of Science in Bangalore.

Tardigrades, also known as water bears, are animals around 1 millimetre long. They are famous for being able to withstand extreme conditions that would kill most organisms, such as being completely dried out.

Studying moss at their institute’s campus, Eswarappa and his colleagues found what may be a new species of tardigrade, though they don’t yet have enough information to formally describe it. For now, they are calling it Paramacrobiotus BLR, short for Bangalore.

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“We found this particular tardigrade in many places, especially in places that are well lit with sunlight,” says Eswarappa. The researchers

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COVID-19 can survive on phone screens for 28 days in the dark, study suggests



a hand holding a cell phone: Crystal Cox/Business Insider


© Crystal Cox/Business Insider
Crystal Cox/Business Insider

  • Research from Australia’s national science agency suggests that the COVID-19 virus can survive on smooth surfaces for 28 days at room temperature.
  • The study tested the virus on glass mobile phone screens, plastic and paper banknotes, and stainless steel.
  • Researchers kept these surfaces in the dark during the study. UV light has been shown to kill COVID-19.
  • Previous studies have suggested the virus lingers on these surfaces for seven days or less.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The COVID-19 virus can survive on phone screens for 28 days under laboratory conditions, longer than previously thought, new research from the Australian government’s science agency has found. 

Researchers tested the virus on smooth surfaces such as glass phone screens and paper banknotes. They kept them in the dark at room temperature, around 20 degrees Celsius (68 degrees Fahrenheit).

They found the virus could

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Study Suggests COVID-19 Can Survive For 28 Days On A Smartphone

In some concerning news, a new study has found that COVID-19 can survive for up to 28 days on a smartphone screen. This news comes from a study in Virology Journal which has reinforced the need for regular cleaning of devices and handwashing in the fight against the disease.

Some smartphone manufactures were alert to the threat of coronavirus surviving on screens before this study released. Samsung recently patented something called ‘Antimicrobial Coating’. The thought is that the company will produce smartphone cases designed to fight the virus.

Additionally, successful tests have been conducted of UV Light-based robots designed to kill coronavirus. These have sold to a number of healthcare settings to try and help combat the disease more effectively.

The new research, however, is still quite worrying. As reported by ZDNet it underlies the importance of maintaining good hygiene habits surrounding surface and device cleaning as the virus continues

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COVID-19 virus can survive on smartphone screens for 28 days, claims researchers

Are you still washing your hands often and cleaning your phone screen and other gadgets regularly, or has that habit slipped? With the COVID-19 virus still burning its way through the population, it’s a bad time to let good habits slide, especially given the results of a new study by Australian researchers.

The findings, published in Virology Journal, suggest that the SARS-Cov-2 virus responsible for COVID-19 can last for almost a month on glass, stainless steel, and both paper and polymer banknotes if kept at ambient temperature and humidity (20 °C and 50 percent RH).

Must read: Does Apple’s iOS 14 ‘nuclear’ battery fix work?

According to the paper, “the persistence of SARS-COV-2 on glass and vinyl (both common screen and screen protector materials, suggest that touchscreen devices may provide a potential source of transmission, and should regularly be disinfected especially in multi-user environments.”

It’s not just glass surfaces either.

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4 Ways The Oil Industry Must Rapidly Evolve To Survive

A common misreading of Darwinism is that only the strongest survive. Not quite. Charles Darwin argued that organisms that mutated to adapt to changing environments would, through a process of natural selection, lead to the evolution of new species. It had nothing to do with strength, but adaptability. And while the oil and gas industry has some of the world’s cleverest engineers and scientists, they don’t call it Big Oil because it’s especially good at change. We all know that if the energy sector’s cost structure does not evolve, the entire industry will end up like the prehistoric giants who provided the raw material for fossil fuels in the first place.

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Findings show even small doses of insecticides reduce capacity of insects to survive — ScienceDaily

New research has identified a mechanism by which low levels of insecticides such as, the neonicotinoid Imidacloprid, could harm the nervous, metabolic and immune system of insects, including those that are not pests, such as our leading pollinators, bees.

A study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences led by researchers at the University of Melbourne and Baylor College of Medicine, shows that low doses of Imidacloprid trigger neurodegeneration and disrupt vital body-wide functions, including energy production, vision, movement and the immune system, in the vinegar fly, Drosophila melanogaster.

With insect populations declining around the world and intense use of insecticides suspected to play a role, the findings provide important evidence that even small doses of insecticides reduce the capacity of insects to survive, even those that are not pests.

“Our research was conducted on one insecticide, but there is evidence that other insecticides cause

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UK scientists begin study of how long Covid can survive in the air

It is the question scientists around the world are trying to answer: how long can the coronavirus survive in the tiny aerosol particles we exhale? In a high-security lab near Bristol, entered through a series of airlock doors, scientists may be weeks from finding out.

On Monday, they will start launching tiny droplets of live Sars-CoV-2 and levitating them between two electric rings to test how long the airborne virus remains infectious under different environmental conditions.

“It is a very important question,” said Prof Denis Doorly, an expert in fluid mechanics at Imperial College London, who is not involved in the research. “There is now huge interest in what it could take to mitigate the risk of infection in enclosed spaces, in terms of enhanced natural ventilation, or air-scrubbing systems, or UV-C lighting – but this all depends on knowing how much viable virus remains suspended in the air.”

Until

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