Private Equity Using New Technologies, Tactics to Deliver Investor Returns Despite Decrease in Global Dealmaking

PE M&A Professionals Expect Due Diligence to Speed Up in Next Five Years

Despite a decrease in global mergers and acquisitions (M&A) year to date, private equity (PE) professionals, especially in North America, are leaning into new tactics and technologies, including the use of artificial intelligence, to deliver investor returns. This is according to findings from the Invest in Insight: Private Equity Market Brief report from Datasite®, a leading cloud-based technology provider for the M&A industry, and PitchBook, a financial data and software company.

The report, which is based on market data and a survey of over 500 global PE professionals, shows that PE professionals are actively investing by using new tactics, such as providing credit lines, engaging in private investments in public equities (PIPEs) and contributing to special purpose acquisition companies (SPACs) to capitalize on opportunities to buy publicly listed companies. Additionally, the report highlights the potential for emerging

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Facebook’s China Tactics Backfire – The New York Times

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Instagram’s boss had a message this week for the White House and the world: It was counterproductive for the United States to try to ban TikTok, the popular video app from China.

It’s bad for U.S. tech companies and people in the United States, Adam Mosseri, the head of Instagram, told Axios, if other countries take similar steps against technology from beyond their borders — including Facebook and its Instagram app. (He and Mark Zuckerberg have said this before, too.) “It’s really going to be problematic if we end up banning TikTok and we set a precedent for more countries to ban more apps,” he said.

Mosseri has a point. What he didn’t say, though, was that Facebook has itself partly to blame. The company helped fan the fears about TikTok

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House investigation faults Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google for engaging in anti-competitive monopoly tactics

Congressional investigators faulted Facebook for gobbling up potential competitors with impunity, and they concluded Google improperly scraped rivals’ websites and forced its technology on others to reach its pole position in search and advertising. The lawmakers’ report labeled both of those firms as monopolies while faulting the federal government for failing to crack down on them sooner.

Amazon and Apple, meanwhile, exerted their own form of “monopoly power” to protect and grow their corporate footprints. As operators of two major online marketplaces — a world-leading shopping site for Amazon, and a powerful App Store for Apple — the two tech giants for years set rules that essentially put smaller, competing sellers and software developers at a disadvantage, the report found.

The House investigation stopped short of calling on the Trump administration to break up any of the companies. Instead, it proposed the most sweeping overhaul of U.S. antitrust law in

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DDoS attacks are getting more powerful as attackers change tactics

There’s been a surge in Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks throughout the course of this year, and the attacks are getting more powerful and more disruptive.

DDoS attacks are launched against websites or web services with the aim of disrupting them to the extent that they are taken offline. Attackers direct the traffic from a botnet army of hundreds of thousands of PCs, servers and other internet-connected devices they’ve gained control of via malware towards the target, with the aim of overwhelming it.

An attack can last for just seconds, or hours or days and prevent legitimate users from accessing the online service for that time.

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And while DDoS attacks have been a nuisance for years, the prospect of corporate, e-commerce, healthcare, educational and other services being disrupted at a time when the ongoing global pandemic means more people are reliant

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