What Taiwan needs to defend itself from a Chinese invasion

  • Aggressive Chinese military activity and rhetoric directed at Taiwan has raised the specter of Beijing forcefully reunifying the island country with the mainland.
  • The likelihood of a direct military action still appears low, but the increasingly tense situation has drawn attention to the growing gap between China’s modernizing military and Taiwan’s aging force.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The Taiwan Strait is quickly becoming the tensest it has been in decades.

China has directed aggressive rhetoric and military activity toward Taiwan, and while the likelihood of a direct attack remains low, the rising tensions come as China’s military expands and Taiwan’s military grows increasingly outdated.

This week, Chinese state-run tabloid Global Times published an op-ed saying Taiwan’s current status “will definitely come to an end” and that China will “teach Taiwan independence forces a hard lesson.”

Last month, the People’s Liberation Army’s (PLA) Eastern Theater Command published a

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In U.S.-China Tech Feud, Taiwan Feels Heat From Both Sides

TAINAN, Taiwan — The United States and China are wrestling to lead the world in artificial intelligence, 5G wireless and other cutting-edge technologies. But the real wizardry that makes those advancements possible is being performed on a yam-shaped island that sits between them, geographically and politically.

On Taiwan’s southern rim, inside an arena-size facility stretched out among lush greenery and coconut palms, colossal machines are manipulating matter at unimaginably tiny scale. A powerful laser vaporizes droplets of molten tin, causing them to emit ultraviolet light. Mirrors focus the light into a beam, which draws features into a silicon wafer with the precision, as one researcher put it, “equivalent to shooting an arrow from Earth to hit an apple placed on the moon.”

The high-performance computer chips that emerge from this process go into the brains of the latest tech products from both sides of the Pacific. Or at least they

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EMERGING MARKETS-SMIC curbs help S.Korean, Taiwan stocks after Chinese data boost

    * Jakarta COVID-19 curbs extended 
    * Malaysia's ruling coalition wins state election; reduces
political uncertainty 
    * South Korea, Taiwan chipmakers rise after U.S tightens
exports
to China's SMIC

    Sept 28 (Reuters) - South Korean and Taiwanese stocks each
closed over 1% higher on Monday as investors priced in a boost
for their tech-focussed economies from tighter U.S. curbs on
China's biggest chipmaker, adding to a bright start to the week
for most Asian markets.
    Data showing profits at Chinese industrial firms grew for a
fourth straight month underpinned stock markets in the region,
although the extension of export curbs on Semiconductor
Manufacturing International Corp left
Shanghai's broad index marginally lower.
    The dual-listed chipmaker's shares plunged more than 5% in
both Shanghai and Hong Kong.

    Local chipmakers gained the most in Seoul, helping the
market rise 1.3% as the number of domestic COVID-19
infections fell to its lowest in nearly two 
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EMERGING MARKETS-SMIC’s U.S. curbs aid S.Korean, Taiwan stocks after Chinese data boost

    * Jakarta COVID-19 curbs extended 
    * Malaysia's ruling coalition wins state election; reduces
political uncertainty 
    * South Korea, Taiwan chipmakers rise after U.S tightens
exports
to China's SMIC

    By Nikhil Nainan
    Sept 28 (Reuters) - South Korean and Taiwanese stocks
climbed over 1% each on Monday as investors priced in a boost
for their tech-focussed economies from tighter U.S. curbs on
China's biggest chipmaker, adding to a broadly brighter start
across Asian markets. 
    Data showing profits at Chinese industrial firms grew for a
fourth straight month underpinned stock markets in the region,
although the extension of export curbs on Semiconductor
Manufacturing International Corp left
China's own indices flat after a strong start.

    The dual-listed chipmaker's shares plunged more than 5% in
both Shanghai and Hong Kong.

    Stocks in Seoul climbed 1.2% with local chipmakers
gaining the most, also helped by a fall in the number of daily
COVID-19 infections to 
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Taiwan Stock Market May Find Traction On Monday

(RTTNews) – The Taiwan stock market has moved lower in five straight sessions, sinking almost 650 points or 5.3 percent along the way. The Taiwan Stock Exchange now rests just above the 12,230-point plateau although it’s expected to halt its slide on Monday.

The global forecast for the Asian markets is upbeat, with technology stocks expected to lead the markets higher amidst bargain hunting. The European markets were mixed and the U.S. bourses were sharply higher and the Asian markets figure to follow the latter lead.

The TSE finished modestly lower on Friday as losses from the technology stocks were mitigated by support from the financials and cement companies.

For the day, the index fell 31.49 points or 0.26 percent to finish at 12,232.91 after trading between 12,149.81 and 12,385.81.

Among the actives, Cathay Financial rose 0.26 percent, while Mega Financial jumped 1.67 percent, Fubon Financial collected 0.46 percent, First

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Caught in China-U.S. trade war, Taiwan offers support to chipmakers

TAIPEI (Reuters) – Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen promised on Thursday to help the island’s key semiconductor industry overcome difficulties and consolidate its leading position, offering support to a sector increasingly caught up in China-U.S. trade tensions.

Companies such as the world’s biggest contract chipmaker, Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co Ltd, are major suppliers to the likes of Apple Inc and Qualcomm Inc, as well as Chinese firms like Huawei Technologies Co Ltd.

In July, TSMC said it had stopped taking new orders from Huawei in May and did not plan to ship wafers after Sept. 15, responding to U.S. curbs on supplying the Chinese company, which the Trump administration views as a security threat.

China, for its part, is trying to nurture tech champions of its own, such as SMIC, its biggest chipmaker, and wean itself off reliance on U.S. suppliers.

Taiwan’s chipmakers were a crucial part of the global supply

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B&W Thermal Awarded Contracts Totaling More Than $15 Million for Emissions and Performance Upgrades at Taiwan Power Company Plant

Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) (NYSE: BW) announced that its B&W Thermal segment will design and supply industry leading low-NOx combustion technology and an innovative pulverizer system upgrade for Taiwan Power Company’s Taichung Power Plant in Longjing District, Taichung, Taiwan. The contracts total more than $15 million.

Four of the plant’s boilers were supplied by B&W in the 1990s. B&W Thermal will upgrade the combustion system for one unit, providing its custom-engineered AireJet® low-NOx burners. B&W Thermal’s AireJet burners offer significantly reduced nitrogen oxides levels compared to other low-NOx combustion technology, burning cleaner, with high boiler efficiency and improved plant heat rate. B&W Thermal will also convert the existing pulverizer systems on two units from B&W-89 to B&W-92 pulverizers to provide additional fuel grinding capability and efficiency, and will also provide DSVS rotating classifiers and associated equipment as part of these pulverizer system upgrades.

“B&W Thermal has

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The 2020 Taiwan Innotech Expo Sustainability Pavilion Presents the Circular Technology Island

With the increasing depletion of the earth’s resources, countries worldwide are more determined about green industrial policies. The European Commission adopted the New Circular Economy Action Plan this March. The UK, Japan, and China will draw up a “marine pollution map” in response to the “marine plastic crisis.” These show that the green industry has become a major field of study for human survival and reducing resource consumption. Therefore, the “Sustainability Pavilion” of the “2020 Taiwan Innotech Expo” will focus on the green industrial chain. The core values are “sustainable living,” “sustainable energy,” and “sustainable resources” tied in with “new agriculture,” “green energy technology,” “circular economy,” and “workplace safety” that reflect the four aspects of life. The pavilion will present more than one hundred technologies that can build a sustainable home in the next ten to twenty years.

The circular economy technology ecosystem demonstrated by the circular technology island

The

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Taiwan export orders grow at fastest pace in over two-and-a-half years

FILE PHOTO: Shipping containers are seen at Keelung port, northern Taiwan, March 20, 2016. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

TAIPEI (Reuters) – Taiwan’s export orders grew at their fastest pace in more than two-and-a-half years in August, surging on strong global demand for its telecommuting products, as the coronavirus pandemic forces millions of people around the world to work from home.

The island’s export orders, a bellwether of global technology demand, rose 13.6% in August from a year earlier to $45.5 billion, Ministry of Economic Affairs data showed on Monday, setting a historic high for the month.

The data exceeded an 8.2% rise projected in a Reuters poll and a 12.4% increase in July. It was the sixth consecutive month of gains and the strongest since January 2018.

The ministry said the blockbuster performance was helped by continued strong demand for products such as laptops and tablets, with orders for electronics including smartphones

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Taiwan plant hunters race to collect rare species before they’re gone

By Ann Wang

TAITUNG, Taiwan (Reuters) – In the forests and on remote offshore islands of Taiwan, a group of conservationists are racing to collect as many rare plant species as they can before they are lost to climate change and human encroachment.

Overseen by the Dr. Cecilia Koo Botanic Conservation Centre, the plant hunters are scouring sub-tropical Taiwan for as many rare plant samples as they can find, from the rugged eastern coast around Taitung to Dongyin, in the Matsu archipelago.

“I started collecting plants when I was still at school. I didn’t used to think it was that important. But since I began working at the conservation centre, I have realised that many (living) things that used to be there, are there no longer,” said Hung Hsin-chieh, a research assistant at the conservation centre.

“So for many things, if you don’t conserve them properly then perhaps in the

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