Nuclear magnetic resonance insights set stage for next-gen targeted cancer therapies for adults and children

Nuclear magnetic resonance insights set stage for next-gen targeted cancer therapies for adults and children
First author Tao Xie, Ph.D., and corresponding author Charalampos Babis Kalodimos, Ph.D., chair, both of the Department of Structural Biology at St. Jude, have visualized previously unknown structures of the ABL kinase through the use of an NMR spectrometer. Credit: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

Scientists at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital have visualized previously unknown structures of the ABL kinase, offering insight for designing the next generation of targeted therapies for adult and childhood cancers. The work will advance understanding of treatment resistance to targeted cancer therapies. The findings appear as an advance online publication today in Science.

Central to this achievement was the United States’ most powerful nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer, which was installed at St. Jude in 2019. Just as microscopes enable scientists to peer inside a cell, NMR spectroscopy lets researchers visualize previously invisible, or undetectable, molecular structures that cannot be seen with other

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