The Importance of Teaching Cybersecurity to a 5-Year-Old

IT leaders can take a twofold approach to help K–12 students meet the new security challenges of remote learning.

They can proactively support students and parents in their efforts to stay safe in the remote learning environment, teaching the importance of cybersecurity. They can also shore up internal systems, processes and infrastructure to back up that learning.

Whatever they do, the reality of schools operating almost entirely online has only heightened concerns about cybersecurity — and with good reason. Some of the nation’s largest school districts have recently dealt with cyberattacks that halted remote learning, spurred leaders to postpone the first day of classes or involved the release of sensitive information.

“Instead of having everyone on one network, you have people on multiple networks, and each of those has its own vulnerabilities,” says Amy McLaughlin, CoSN’s project director for cybersecurity initiatives. “You may have an increase in fraud attacks because

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How teaching hope in school may be the elusive key to success

  • Richard Miller is an expert in child development and a professor at the T. Denny Sanford School of Social and Family Dynamic at Arizona State University.
  • He says science has documented how teaching hope as both a cognitive function and a practice can be a powerful strategy for success.
  • Miller believes that teaching children to imagine their goals encourages the brain to plan and prepare for future challenges and opportunities.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

On Erin Gruwell’s first day as a high school English teacher, she faced a classroom of 150 “at risk” freshmen. Most of these kids, statistically, were going to fail. They were tough, their young lives already defined by poverty, gangs, violence, and low expectations. These students, she wrote, knew nearly every “four-letter word” except one: hope.

Yet four years later, every one of her “at risk” students at Wilson High School in Long

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Research on Emerging Technologies for Teaching and Learning (RETTL) (nsf20612) | NSF


Replaces Document(s):

NSF 17-598


National Science Foundation

Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering

Directorate for Education and Human Resources

Directorate for Engineering

Directorate for Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences

Full Proposal Deadline(s) (due by 5 p.m. submitter’s local time):


     January 25, 2021

Deadline for FY 2021 competition


     October 18, 2021

Deadline for FY 2022 competition


     October 17, 2022

Deadline for FY 2023 competition



IMPORTANT INFORMATION AND REVISION NOTES

Please note that the solicitation has been substantially revised. The main revisions are:

  • The program’s new name (previously called Cyberlearning) reflects its broad scope and includes a new focus on supporting research on emerging technologies for teaching. In addition to supporting student learning, this new focus supports research to enhance the work of teachers, mentors, and educators in formal and informal settings.
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Ethics, Society and Technology Hub embeds ethics in teaching and research

In recent decades, ideas originating with Stanford students and faculty brought technologies that have disrupted industries, revolutionized business and eased communication in our daily lives. But they have also been linked to societal problems such as widening inequality, racial bias and lack of privacy.

Political science professors Margaret Levi and Rob Reich will co-lead the Ethics, Society and Technology (EST) Hub. (Image credit: L.A. Cicero)

As a way of ensuring that technological advances born at Stanford address the full range of ethical and societal implications, the Long-Range Vision launched the Ethics, Society and Technology (EST) Hub, co-led by Margaret Levi and Rob Reich, both professors of political science.

“Stanford is home to outstanding ethicists and social scientists but they haven’t been well integrated into the ways we teach about, or do research related to, technology,” said Debra Satz, the Vernon R. and Lysbeth Warren Anderson Dean of the School of

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