Wisconsin tells Foxconn no tax credits without new deal

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Wisconsin told Foxconn Technology Group on Monday that it won’t qualify for billions of dollars in state tax credits unless it strikes a new deal for a scaled-back factory complex.

State officials have told Foxconn since last year that it would not qualify for the tax credits without revisions to its 2017 contract because the scope of the envisioned factory has been reduced. President Donald Trump heralded the original deal as a sign of a revitalized American manufacturing economy, calling the envisioned plant “transformational” and the “eighth wonder of the world.”

The deal with Foxconn, the world’s largest electronics manufacturer, was announced by Trump at a White House ceremony and he traveled to Wisconsin in 2018 for the groundbreaking.

Foxconn signed a contract with Wisconsin under then-Gov. Scott Walker in 2017 to earn nearly $4 billion in state and local tax incentives for a $10 billion

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New smartphone app tells New Yorkers if they’ve been exposed to coronavirus

Albany, N.Y. — Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced today a new smartphone app is available that will tell New Yorkers if they have been exposed to someone who has tested positive for coronavirus.

Smartphone users who download the free app, called “Covid Alert NY,” will be notified if they have been within six feet of an infected person for at least 10 minutes.

“It’s using technology on a level it’s never been used before,” Cuomo said in a telephone press briefing.

Cuomo said the new app is voluntary and anonymous. It can be downloaded from the Apple App Store and Google Play.

The state Health Department will contact people who have tested positive and ask them to anonymously participate in the smartphone contract tracing program. New Yorkers who are notified by the app that they have been exposed will be directed to quarantine, stay home and call a doctor.

The app

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QNAP tells NAS users to update firmware to avoid new type of ransomware

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Image: QNAP

Taiwanese hardware vendor QNAP urged customers last week to update the firmware and apps installed on their network-attached storage (NAS) devices to avoid infections with a new strain of ransomware named AgeLocker.

The ransomware has been active since June this year when it first began making victims.

It was named AgeLocker for its use of the Actually Good Encryption (AGE) algorithm to encrypt files. The AGE encryption algorithm is considered cryptographically secure, which means encrypted files can’t be recovered without paying the ransom demand.

Techniques like brute-forcing the encryption key or identifying weaknesses in the encryption scheme are not reliable against AGE.

The impossibility of recovering encrypted files without paying the ransom demand is why users should take care to secure QNAP NAS devices.

Last week, QNAP said it identified two sources of how AgeLocker gains access to QNAP devices. The first is the QNAP device firmware

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US faces tight timeline for 2024 moon landing, NASA chief tells Senate

NASA needs to have a new  lunar lander and giant rocket ready by next year in order to return astronauts to the moon by 2024, the space agency’s chief Jim Bridenstine told Congress Wednesday (Sept. 23). 

In a Senate appropriations committee hearing, Bridenstine said NASA aims to send an uncrewed mission, called Artemis 1, around the moon in November 2021 to prepare for the first orbital mission with astronauts two years later, Artemis 2. The Artemis 3 mission would follow, sending astronauts to the south pole of the moon in 2024. 

Bridenstine said he is worried about the effects on the Artemis program if any of the missions are delayed which could happen for technical or funding reasons. 

“If that Artemis [1] mission pushes too far from 2021, if it starts to encroach on Artemis 2 in 2023, it creates a crescendo where if one [mission] starts getting pushed, the

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What A Book Written About The Great War Of 1914 Tells Us We Need To Think Differently About The Future Of Work To Succeed.

Barbara Tuchman’s seminal book, The Guns of August, describes the old-world precepts that dictated the thinking for the start of the First World War and much of the first three years of one of the worst conflicts the planet. It might be some hundred plus years ago, and the worst pandemic followed it since the plague of 1665.

The war over the future of work should not be compared to these two awful events. Still, thinking about what the future of work looks like is equally dependent on old-world precepts around the idea of working in the office versus working remotely.

There is no

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New freshwater database tells water quality story for 12K lakes globally — ScienceDaily

Although less than one per cent of all water in the world is freshwater, it is what we drink and use for agriculture. In other words, it’s vital to human survival. York University researchers have just created a publicly available water quality database for close to 12,000 freshwater lakes globally — almost half of the world’s freshwater supply — that will help scientists monitor and manage the health of these lakes.

The study, led by Faculty of Science Postdoctoral Fellow Alessandro Filazzola and Master’s student Octavia Mahdiyan, collected data for lakes in 72 countries, from Antarctica to the United States and Canada. Hundreds of the lakes are in Ontario.

“The database can be used by scientists to answer questions about what lakes or regions may be faring worse than others, how water quality has changed over the years and which environmental stressors are most important in driving changes in water

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What Research in Antarctica Tells Us about the Science of Isolation

Over the past few months, the phrase “social distancing” has entered our lexicon. Many of us have found ourselves separated from family and friends—or at least from our normal social lives. As humans grapple with pandemic-induced isolation, science is starting to offer insight into what may be happening in our brains when our social contact with others is dramatically reduced.

That insight happens to come from a place with more penguins than people.

Tim Heitland of the Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Center for Polar and Marine Research in Germany spent 14 months in Antarctica between 2016 and 2018. When he returned, daily life felt overwhelming—everything from the colors and vegetation to all the other people. Part of the shock may have come from returning with a different brain than the one he left with.

While the members of Heitland’s crew conducted research on the earth’s iciest continent, they themselves were

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University of Washington to test smartphone app that tells you if you were exposed to the coronavirus

This fall, the University of Washington plans to test smartphone technology that tells users if they may have been exposed to the virus that causes COVID-19.

Depending on how that pilot program goes, it could become available throughout Washington, said state Department of Health (DOH) spokesperson Cory Portner.

The Exposure Notifications System for iPhones and Android phones uses Bluetooth technology developed by Apple and Google to detect proximity to other phones. If someone who has enabled these notifications tests positive, they can anonymously and confidentially notify other users who have been within 6 feet of them.

“If you opt in to use the app and receive notification that you’ve been potentially exposed, the message will help you connect with public health to get recommendations on next steps,” DOH spokesperson Jamie Nixon said.

The design is aimed at preserving privacy by not collecting location data or sharing users’ identities, which might

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TikTok tells Australian Senate committee it doesn’t want to be a ‘political football’

In a submission to the Senate Select Committee and its inquiry into Foreign Interference Through Social Media, controversial video-sharing app TikTok has taken the opportunity to address what it has labelled misinformation in regards to itself.

TikTok, owned by China’s ByteDance Ltd, is currently offered in “all major markets” except China, where the company offers a different short-form video app called Douyin, and Hong Kong, following the introduction of its new security law.

It is currently banned in India and was previously on the US’ chopping block when President Donald Trump issued executive orders to ban the app. TikTok received approval to operate in the US, however, when the app’s US footprint was sold to Oracle and Walmart.

Read more: What TikTok’s big deal means for cloud, e-commerce: TikTok Global created with Oracle, Walmart owning 20%

The app was launched in May 2017 and its official launch in Australia occurred

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Facebook Tells Irish Court That Probe Threatens Its EU Operations – Newspaper | World News

DUBLIN (Reuters) – Facebook has told Ireland’s High Court it cannot see how its services could operate in the European Union if regulators freeze its data transfer mechanism, the Sunday Business Post reported, citing court documents seen by the paper.

The U.S. social media giant last week said that the Irish Data Protection Commission, its lead EU regulator, had made a preliminary decision that the mechanism it uses to transfer data from the EU to the United States “cannot in practice be used”.

Facebook requested and secured a temporary freeze on the order and a court review in the Irish High Court, which is due to consider the issue in November.

In an affidavit submitted to the court to request that the order be frozen, Yvonne Cunnane, Facebook Ireland’s head of data protection and associate general counsel, said it was not clear how the company could continue providing services in

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