Modelling extreme magnetic fields and temperature variation on distant stars — ScienceDaily

New research is helping to explain one of the big questions that has perplexed astrophysicists for the past 30 years — what causes the changing brightness of distant stars called magnetars.

Magnetars were formed from stellar explosions or supernovae and they have extremely strong magnetic fields, estimated to be around 100 million, million times greater than the magnetic field found on earth.

The magnetic field generates intense heat and x-rays. It is so strong it also affects the physical properties of matter, most notably the way that heat is conducted through the crust of the star and across its surface, creating the variations in brightness across the star which has puzzled astrophysicists and astronomers.

A team of scientists — led by Dr Andrei Igoshev at the University of Leeds — has developed a mathematical model that simulates the way the magnetic field disrupts the conventional understanding of heat being distributed

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Modeling temperature variation on distant stars

Modeling temperature variation on distant stars
The cooler (blue) and hotter regions (yellow) on a magnetar. The source data came from magnetars: 4U 0142+61, 1E 1547.0-5408, XTE J1810–197, SGR 1900 + 14. Credit: University of Leeds

New research is helping to explain one of the big questions that has perplexed astrophysicists for the past 30 years—what causes the changing brightness of distant stars called magnetars.


Magnetars were formed from stellar explosions or supernovae and they have extremely strong magnetic fields, estimated to be around 100 million, million times greater than the magnetic field found on earth.

The magnetic field on each magnetar generates intense heat and X-rays. It is so strong it affects the physical properties of matter, most notably the way that heat is conducted through the crust of the star and across its surface, creating the variations in brightness which has puzzled astrophysicists and astronomers.

A team of scientists—led by Dr. Andrei Igoshev at

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Can temperature scanning slow COVID-19 spread? Airports are the testing ground for new tech

A camera in the security lines at Dallas Love Field is scanning every passerby for elevated temperatures, in a test by the airport and Southwest Airlines to find out if it can detect sick people before they board flights.

In the back hallways, employees are getting temperature checks at kiosks before they start work each day, trying to keep sick employees out of the airport, too.

As airlines, companies and governments scramble to reopen a battered economy facing the eighth month of a worldwide pandemic, airports are now the frontline for evolving thermal imaging technologies designed to pick out infected travelers before they can spread COVID-19 further.

Temperature scanning device makers such as Dallas-based Wello Inc. and Beaumont’s Infared Cameras Inc. have suddenly been inundated with requests for their technology. Even small restaurants, hotels and schools are asking about it.

“It’s not just convention centers and airlines,” said Gary Strahan,

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Teledyne DALSA’s thermal imaging camera plays pivotal role in Nuvoola’s AI-powered elevated skin temperature screening solution

Nuvoola’s Luke AI Health Screening and Protection solution

Teledyne DALSA's Calibir GXF thermal camera is a critical component within the Nuvoola Luke AI HSP solution
Teledyne DALSA’s Calibir GXF thermal camera is a critical component within the Nuvoola Luke AI HSP solution
Teledyne DALSA’s Calibir GXF thermal camera is a critical component within the Nuvoola Luke AI HSP solution

WATERLOO, Ontario, Oct. 06, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Teledyne DALSA, a Teledyne Technologies [NYSE:TDY] company, and global leader in digital imaging technology, is pleased to provide its new Calibir GXF thermal camera as a critical component within Nuvoola’s LUKE™ AI Health Screening and Protection (HSP) solution.

The new Calibir GXF model is optimized for elevated skin temperature detection with measurement accuracy and thermal stability better than +/-0.3°C with an external reference (as recommended by IEC80601-2-59). Like Calibir GXM models, the new GXF camera is NDAA, Section 889 compliant with IEC 80601-2-59-2017 certification pending.

Nuvoola’s LUKE™ AI Health Screening and Protection (HSP) solution is unique in using their artificial

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Climate change responsible for record sea temperature levels — ScienceDaily

Global warming is driving an unprecedented rise in sea temperatures including in the Mediterranean, according to a major new report published by the peer-reviewed Journal of Operational Oceanography.

Data from the European Union’s (EU) Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service (CMEMS) will increase concerns about the threat to the world’s seas and oceans from climate change.

The Ocean State Report reveals an overall trend globally of surface warming based on evidence from 1993 to 2018, with the largest rise in the Arctic Ocean.

European seas experienced record high temperatures in 2018, a phenomenon which the researchers attribute to extreme weather conditions — a marine heat wave lasting several months.

In the same year, a large mass of warm water occurred in the northeast Pacific Ocean, according to the report. This was similar to a marine heatwave — dubbed ‘the Blob’ — which was first detected in 2013 and had devastating

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A new thermometer measures temperature with sound

A new device eavesdrops on objects to take their temperatures.

Hot objects not only glow, but also softly hum. The hum is generated by the rapid jitters of particles that make up the hot object. If human ears were keen enough to hear this noise, “it would sound like radio static,” says Tom Purdy of the University of Pittsburgh. “The hotter [an object] gets, the louder it gets.”

Purdy, along with Robinjeet Singh of the University of Maryland in College Park, created an acoustic thermometer that senses the intensity of heat-generated sound emanating from nearby objects. The heart of the device is a one-square-millimeter sheet of silicon nitride. That sheet is suspended within a window cut in the center of a silicon chip, which transmits sound waves better than air.

In experiments, the physicists deposited blobs of an epoxy material on the chip’s surface around the silicon nitride sheet. When

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Rising Temperature Could Melt Antarctica ‘Irreversibly’, Warns New Study

KEY POINTS

  • Researchers say melting Antarctic ice could raise sea level by 8 feet
  • Such a rise in sea levels would devastate coastal cities and cultural sites around the world
  • Study says the only solution is to bring the world’s temperature back to pre-industrial levels

Coastal cities and cultural sites around the world could soon be submerged in water if the melting of ice in Antarctica reaches an “irreversible” level. If global warming is allowed to continue unchecked, most of Antarctica will be gone forever, a new study warns.  

The melting of ice in Antarctica can make glaciers the size of Florida slide into the ocean, said Anders Levermann, a researcher at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research in Germany, and a co-author of the study. The team ran computer simulations to identify “where exactly and at which warming levels the ice in Antarctica would melt.”  

“We find that

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Climate scientists uncover new record-low temperature in Greenland

On the heels of the hottest summer the Northern Hemisphere has ever seen, U.N. researchers digging through the climate record have reported a chilling discovery: On Dec. 22, 1991, a remote weather station atop the Greenland ice sheet recorded a temperature of minus 93.3 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 69.6 degrees Celsius) — the coldest temperature ever recorded in the Northern Hemisphere.

The frigid new record, announced Wednesday (Sept. 23) in a statement from the U.N.’s World Meteorological Organization (WMO), shivers past the previous record of minus 90.4 F (minus 67.8 C) set in two different towns in the Siberian Arctic, first in 1892 and the other in 1933. For comparison, all three of those extreme lows sneak past the average temperature on Mars, which is roughly minus 81 F (minus 63 C), according to NASA.

“In the era of climate change … this newly recognized cold record is an important

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Depew School District using temperature wrist scanners to start new school year

The Depew Union Free School District has spent about $30,000 on new technology to detect whether anyone has a temperature.

DEPEW, N.Y. — Some local schools are already back in the classroom – others will return next week, and at one local district new technology is being used that’s intended to keep everyone safe.

The Depew Union Free School District will start the new year with Wrist temperature scanners at all their entrances. The wrist temperature scanners give you a reading in just five seconds.

“Every student, every employee has to pass by those scanners to get their temperature checked before they come in,” said Jeffrey Rabey, the Depew Schools superintendent. 

This on top of health screenings that should be done at home.

The district purchased 10 standing temperature scanners at a cost of nearly $30,000 using CARES Act funding, but according to the district superintendent, the manufacturer is backed

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Coldest Northern Hemisphere temperature officially confirmed

Coldest Northern Hemisphere temperature, first recorded by UW-Madison, officially confirmed
The coldest temperature in the Northern Hemisphere was recorded in Greenland in 1991. That temperature, first documented by the UW–Madison Antarctic Meteorological Research Center, was just confirmed by the World Meteorological Organization. Credit: NASA

Nearly 30 years after recording a temperature of minus 93.2 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 69.6 Celsius) in Greenland, the measurement has been verified by the World Meteorological Organization as the coldest recorded temperature in the Northern Hemisphere.


The measurement was first recorded by a University of Wisconsin-Madison Antarctic Meteorological Research Center Automatic Weather Station in December 1991. An AWS is a standalone instrument suite developed by UW-Madison Space Science and Engineering Center and AMRC scientists and engineers to collect numerous environmental parameters such as air temperature, pressure, humidity, wind direction and speed. The information is then relayed via satellite back to SSEC in near real time.

Over time, these data have come to provide a benchmark for

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