Mouse immune study gives pointers for development of vaccines and immune therapies — ScienceDaily

Researchers have charted the activity of tens of thousands of genes in mouse immune cells over the course of an infection. The study from the University of Melbourne, Australia, the Wellcome Sanger Institute, and their collaborators created the first full dynamic map of how cells learn to fight microbes and then preserve a memory of this for future infections.

The findings, published in the journal Nature Immunology, could help scientists develop new vaccines and therapeutics for a range of diseases by guiding their research into a particular set of immune cells, known as CD4+ T cells, that are essential for generating immunity.

The international research team studied the CD4+ T cells during an experimental infection of mice with malaria-causing parasites, which invade and multiply inside red blood cells. With the aid of machine learning techniques, the research team combined the gene activity data over four weeks of infection to

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Dr. Jutta Wanner Joins Her Next Generation ADC Technology at OS Therapies as Chief Technology Officer

CAMBRIDGE, Md., Oct. 9, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — OS Therapies, a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on discovering and developing innovative therapies to treat and cure Osteosarcoma (OS) and other deadly cancers in kids and adults, today announced the appointment of Jutta Wanner, Ph.D., as its Chief Technology Officer. She is continuing to support the Next Generation Antibody Drug Conjugate (ADC) technology that she helped to develop at BlinkBio, which OS Therapies recently in-licensed.

At BlinkBio, Dr. Wanner was a member of the leadership team setting research strategy for chemistry and biology, developed business, and science focused company strategies. She developed the Medical and Computational Chemistry Group, represented Chemistry and Discovery in Board of Director, Scientific Advisory Board and Partnering/Collaboration meetings. Specifically, Dr. Wanner:

  • Established the Tunable Drug Conjugate (TDC) platform technology to deliver next generation Drug Conjugates
  • Developed the lead TDC program which targets Folate Receptor alpha (FRa) which
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Study may advance genetic therapies for blindness and other injuries to the central nervous system — ScienceDaily

Working with fish, birds and mice, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report new evidence that some animals’ natural capacity to regrow neurons is not missing, but is instead inactivated in mammals. Specifically, the researchers found that some genetic pathways that allow many fish and other cold-blooded animals to repair specialized eye neurons after injury remain present in mammals as well, but are turned off, blocking regeneration and healing.

A description of the study, published online by the journal Science on Oct. 1, offers a better understanding of how genes that control regeneration are conserved across species, as well as how they function. This may help scientists develop ways to grow cells that are lost due to hereditary blindness and other neurodegenerative diseases.

“Our research overall indicates that the potential for regeneration is there in mammals, including humans, but some evolutionary pressure has turned it off,” says Seth Blackshaw, Ph.D., professor of

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CU Anschutz campus to get new technology that can cut screening time for new drug therapies in half

AURORA, Colo. (KDVR) — The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora announced Tuesday the addition of new technology that researchers say could cut the screening time for new drug therapies in half.

Researchers say the new robotic screening and imaging technology could speed up the development of treatments for COVID, cancer or other diseases, while putting Colorado on the map in this field.

“Similar technologies exist on the coasts in academic institutions, but nothing in this region,” said Dr. David Ross, an associate dean at the CU Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.

He and his colleagues say the machine can take a library with thousands of compounds and quickly screen them against targets in a disease.

“If the disease model took two weeks to screen, we can now screen it in a couple of days,” said Dr. Dan LaBarbera, a researcher who will be using the

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A unique technology to rapidly screen new drugs, therapies

drug
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus announced a new robotic screening and imaging technology today marking a major breakthrough in the detection and treatment of disease.

The technology, made possible by a gift to the University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, could cut the screening time for new drug therapies by half. That means therapies and pharmaceuticals could be ready for patients faster than ever before.

“This technology does not exist at any academic institution in the Mountain West and is limited between the two coasts, placing the CU Anschutz Medical Campus in a unique position to advance drug discovery in Colorado and beyond,” said David Ross, Ph.D., associate dean for research at the CU Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. “We envision this new screening and imaging technology will be applied to both small molecule and biologic drug development

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CU Anschutz announces unique technology to rapidly screen new drugs, therapies

The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus announced a new robotic screening and imaging technology today marking a major breakthrough in the detection and treatment of disease.

The technology, made possible by a gift to the University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, could cut the screening time for new drug therapies by half. That means therapies and pharmaceuticals could be ready for patients faster than ever before.

“This technology does not exist at any academic institution in the Mountain West and is limited between the two coasts, placing the CU Anschutz Medical Campus in a unique position to advance drug discovery in Colorado and beyond,” said David Ross, PhD, associate dean for research at the CU Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. “We envision this new screening and imaging technology will be applied to both small molecule and biologic drug development and will position the

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Nuclear magnetic resonance insights set stage for next-gen targeted cancer therapies for adults and children

Nuclear magnetic resonance insights set stage for next-gen targeted cancer therapies for adults and children
First author Tao Xie, Ph.D., and corresponding author Charalampos Babis Kalodimos, Ph.D., chair, both of the Department of Structural Biology at St. Jude, have visualized previously unknown structures of the ABL kinase through the use of an NMR spectrometer. Credit: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

Scientists at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital have visualized previously unknown structures of the ABL kinase, offering insight for designing the next generation of targeted therapies for adult and childhood cancers. The work will advance understanding of treatment resistance to targeted cancer therapies. The findings appear as an advance online publication today in Science.

Central to this achievement was the United States’ most powerful nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer, which was installed at St. Jude in 2019. Just as microscopes enable scientists to peer inside a cell, NMR spectroscopy lets researchers visualize previously invisible, or undetectable, molecular structures that cannot be seen with other

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