Ancient tiny teeth reveal first mammals lived more like reptiles — ScienceDaily

Pioneering analysis of 200 million-year-old teeth belonging to the earliest mammals suggests they functioned like their cold-blooded counterparts — reptiles, leading less active but much longer lives.

The research, led by the University of Bristol, UK and University of Helsinki, Finland, published today in Nature Communications, is the first time palaeontologists have been able to study the physiologies of early fossil mammals directly, and turns on its head what was previously believed about our earliest ancestors.

Fossils of teeth, the size of a pinhead, from two of the earliest mammals, Morganucodon and Kuehneotherium, were scanned for the first time using powerful X-rays, shedding new light on the lifespan and evolution of these small mammals, which roamed the earth alongside early dinosaurs and were believed to be warm-blooded by many scientists. This allowed the team to study growth rings in their tooth sockets, deposited every year like tree rings, which

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The Tiny Technology Helping Cannabinoid Balance By CBD Products Inc. Make A Big Splash

LA JOLLA, Calif., Oct. 9, 2020 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ — Nanotechnology has long been understood to support many facets of medical science. Researchers and manufacturers are taking this proven technology and are now applying it to one of the fastest growing consumer markets in the world – CBD. And no one has been more active in bringing this tiny technology to CBD consumers than CBD Products Inc, with their new nano inspired brand Cannabinoid Balance.

Having seen that nanotechnology could have a profound effect on absorption rates in the body, the team at CBD Products Inc. turned to NanoZorb™ to help deliver the cannabinoids and terpenes in their Cannabinoid Balance products into the bloodstream quicker.

As with so many things in science, Nano Technology works by increasing the contact area and in turn increases the rate of absorption. By using NanoZorb™Technology in their Cannabinoid Balance products, Anthony Tribunella realized that he

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What tiny surfing robots teach us about surface tension — ScienceDaily

Spend an afternoon by a creek in the woods, and you’re likely to notice water striders — long-legged insects that dimple the surface of the water as they skate across. Or, dip one side of a toothpick in dish detergent before placing it in a bowl of water, and impress your grade schooler as the toothpick gently starts to move itself across the surface.

Both situations illustrate the concepts of surface tension and propulsion velocity. At Michigan Technological University, mechanical engineer Hassan Masoud and PhD student Saeed Jafari Kang have applied the lessons of the water strider and the soapy toothpick to develop an understanding of chemical manipulation of surface tension.

Their vehicle? Tiny surfing robots.

“During the past few decades, there have been many efforts to fabricate miniature robots, especially swimming robots,” said Masoud, an assistant professor in the mechanical engineering-engineering mechanics department. “Much less work has been done

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Tiny Changes Let False Claims About COVID-19, Voting Evade Facebook Fact Checks : NPR

Facebook labels posts that its fact checkers have found false, as in the screenshot on the left. On the right, a similar post had no label applied.

Screeenshot via Avaaz


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Screeenshot via Avaaz

Facebook labels posts that its fact checkers have found false, as in the screenshot on the left. On the right, a similar post had no label applied.

Screeenshot via Avaaz

Something as simple as changing the font of a message or cropping an image can be all it takes to bypass Facebook’s defenses against hoaxes and lies.

A new analysis by the international advocacy group Avaaz shines light on why, despite the tech giant’s efforts to stamp out misinformation about the coronavirus pandemic and the U.S. election, it’s so hard to stop bad actors from spreading these falsehoods.

“We found them getting around Facebook’s policies by just tweaking the misinformation a little bit,

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Someone Got Skyrim Running On A Tiny Keyboard Screen

Even if The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim isn’t the most ported game in history, it certainly feels like it. While not an official port, Redditor Mr_Murdoc managed to get Skyrim running on a tiny OLED display fitted to a keyboard, showing how the game’s opening scene looks at a minuscule resolution.

The keyboard is a SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL, and while it doesn’t have the hardware to run the game itself, it does have a tiny screen that can work as a monitor. The display is usually used to show keyboard functions, though it can also be used to play videos or gifs. Mr_Murdoc explained that the game as shown in the video is actually playable, however, and involved using a program that would mirror the game as it ran on their main monitor.

The graphics look pretty similar to Skyrim on a pregnancy test, though that version was just

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Tiny Projection Of Vermeer Painting Demonstrates New Nanoscale Technology

Johannes Vermeer’s “Girl With a Pearl Earring” is not a very large painting, but the replica recently created by researchers in China and the USA is even smaller. Scientists at Nanjing University, University of Maryland and the National Institute of Standards and Technology have fine-tuned an existing technology so that it not only filters through light of different colors using an array of nanoscale structures, but also projects light with different intensities. To show their new method in action, they used it to generate a projection of Vermeer’s painting, including all the detail of the shaded areas.

The mechanism they used involved a set of tiny titanium dioxide pillars mounted on a small glass plate. The pillars are only

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Small Nuclear Reactor Pilot Program: NuScale Tiny Reactor Project

  • Two of 35 cities have opted out of a pilot nuclear plant program powered by NuScale.
  • NuScale’s tiny modular reactors will be manufactured at Idaho National Laboratory.
  • Time will tell if these two opt-outs hold larger meaning for NuScale’s ambitious plans.

    Small modular reactor startup NuScale had a setback this week when two cities pulled out of a planned 35-city pilot program of new nuclear plants. As the first small reactor to break through many regulatory landmarks, NuScale has been under a great deal of public scrutiny. Is this a bump in the road or something more? That’s a question of perspective.

    ☢️ You like nuclear. So do we. Let’s nerd out over nuclear together.

    Nuclear power plants in the U.S. from the current generation are aging out, reaching “end of life” and beyond for the kind of technology they include. China is continuing to add gigantic nuclear power plants

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    This tiny device can scavenge wind energy from the breeze you make when you walk — ScienceDaily

    Most of the wind available on land is too gentle to push commercial wind turbine blades, but now researchers in China have designed a kind of “tiny wind turbine” that can scavenge wind energy from breezes as little as those created by a brisk walk. The method, presented September 23 in the journal Cell Reports Physical Science, is a low-cost and efficient way of collecting light breezes as a micro-energy source.

    The new device is not technically a turbine. It is a nanogenerator made of two plastic strips in a tube that flutter or clap together when there is airflow. Like rubbing a balloon to your hair, the two plastics become electrically charged after being separated from contact, a phenomenon called the triboelectric effect. But instead of making your hair stand up like Einstein’s, the electricity generated by the two plastic strips is captured and stored.

    “You can collect

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    Big Tech owes its existence to Simulmatics, a tiny company in the 60s

    Sixty years ago, a little-known company called the Simulmatics Corporation claimed credit for helping elect John F. Kennedy president by inventing a computer program that could predict human behavior.

    Simulmatics – a portmanteau of “simulation” and “automatic” – used bulky IBM computers to vacuum up punch cards full of data on slivers of the electorate and then spit out predictions about what voters might do. The Kennedy campaign followed Simulmatics’s recommendation to address anti-Catholic prejudice head-on, something the candidate might have done anyway.

    The publicity-savvy company used the buzz generated about its Kennedy campaign to get hired by Madison Avenue advertising firms. Then, as the 1960s took a darker turn, Simulmatics tried to guide counter-insurgency programs abroad and predict race riots at home.

    To historian Jill Lepore, Simulmatics’s creators are “the long-dead, white-whiskered grandfathers” of contemporary tech titans like Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg and Google’s Sergey Brin, and the origin of

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    New 3-D printing method could jump-start creation of tiny medical devices for the body

    NIST scientists get soft on 3D printing
    Illustration of a prospective biocompatible interface shows that hydrogels (green tubing), which can be generated by an electron or X-ray beam 3D-printing process, act as artificial synapses or junctions, connecting neurons (brown) to electrodes (yellow). Credit: A. Strelcov/NIST

    Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a new method of 3-D-printing gels and other soft materials. Published in a new paper, it has the potential to create complex structures with nanometer-scale precision. Because many gels are compatible with living cells, the new method could jump-start the production of soft tiny medical devices such as drug delivery systems or flexible electrodes that can be inserted into the human body.


    A standard 3-D printer makes solid structures by creating sheets of material—typically plastic or rubber—and building them up layer by layer, like a lasagna, until the entire object is created.

    Using a 3-D printer to fabricate an object

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