2021 Honda Accord revealed: New style, new tech but no manual transmission

Wider grilles are all the rage.


Honda

One of our favorite midsize sedans here at Roadshow is in for some updates. The 2021 Honda Accord bowed on Monday with slightly tweaked styling, more tech and a new trim level that will surely appeal to those shopping the popular Accord Sport variant. All in all, the updates should be much appreciated by those still interested in a vehicle with four doors and a trunk.

Every Accord trim gets a new, wider grille that incorporates some horizontal pieces to emphasize width. It’s definitely not a huge change, but it helps the Honda Sensing suite of driver-assist tech work even better, according to the automaker. LED headlights are also standard on Accord Sport and above, though those shopping the Accord Hybrid will need to splurge for at least the EX trim for the same lighting tech. Every Accord except the Sport trim gets

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Principle of lentiviral cross-species transmission leading to the emergence of the AIDS virus — ScienceDaily

Humans are exposed continuously to the menace of viral diseases such as those caused by the Ebola virus, Zika virus and coronaviruses. Such emerging/re-emerging viral outbreaks can be triggered by cross-species viral transmission from wild animals to humans.

To achieve cross-species transmission, new hosts have to be exposed to the virus from the old host. Next, the viruses acquire certain mutations that can be beneficial for replicating in the new hosts. Finally, through sustained transmission in the new host, the viruses adapt further evolving as a new virus in the new host. However, at the outset of this process, the viruses have to overcome “the species barriers,” which hamper viral cross-species transmission. Mammals including humans have “intrinsic immunity” mechanisms that have diverged enough in evolution to erect species barriers to viral transmission.

HIV-1 most likely originated from related precursors found in chimpanzees and gorillas

HIV-1, the causative agent of AIDS,

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COVID-19 transmission rebounds quickly after physical distancing rules are relaxed — ScienceDaily

Across the U.S., the relaxation of statewide physical distancing measures that are designed to control the COVID-19 pandemic frequently resulted in an immediate reversal of public health gains against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes the disease, researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and colleagues reported.

Looking at data from all 50 states and the District of Columbia, the researchers found a gradual but steady decline in viral transmission rates during the eight weeks immediately preceding relaxation of physical distancing rules. But almost immediately after those rules were relaxed, most states reversed course. Eight weeks after restrictions were lifted or loosened, only nine of 51 still had low rates of transmission.

“Premature relaxation of social distancing measures undermined the country’s ability to control the disease burden associated with COVID-19,” writes Alexander C. Tsai, MD, investigator in the Department of Psychiatry at MGH and associate professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School,

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Using mobile technology to predict invasive species transmission

Using mobile technology to predict invasive species transmission
Invasive Eurasian milfoil entangled on a boat and trailer. Credit: NYS Department of Environmental Conservation

A cooler full of fish might not be the only thing anglers bring back from a trip to the lake. Unknowingly, they may also be transporting small aquatic “hitchhikers” that attach themselves to boats, motors ― and even fishing gear ― when moving between bodies of water.


Considerable research shows that aquatic invasive species can completely transform ecosystems by introducing disease, out-competing and eating native species, altering food webs, changing physical habitat, devastating water-delivery systems and damaging economies. Furthermore, once established, eradication of nuisance species is near impossible, and management can be extremely difficult and costly.

Although preventative measures have been enacted to reduce their introduction and spread, such as mandatory watercraft inspections, educational programs and even dogs trained in sniffing out invasive species, these aquatic stowaways still manage to find their way into new

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After CDC whiplash, here’s what science says about airborne transmission of the coronavirus

Evidence is mounting that the virus can linger in the air.

When the CDC updated its website on Friday to acknowledge that airborne transmission of the coronavirus beyond six feet may play a role in the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly indoors, the update was hailed by infectious disease experts interviewed by ABC News as an overdue step.

But on Monday morning, the agency took down that language, saying it was posted in “error.” Despite the CDC guidance whiplash, experts say it’s time to recognize that airborne transmission beyond six feet is possible — while continuing to emphasize that close contact within six feet is still the main way the virus is transmitted.

Scientists maintain that close, person-to-person contact is a main driver of the virus’ spread. This transmission is primarily via respiratory droplets

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Impact of evaporation on virus survival, concentration, transmission — ScienceDaily

As COVID-19 cases continue to rise worldwide, it is increasingly urgent to understand how climate impacts the continued spread of the coronavirus, particularly as winter virus infections are more common and countries in the northern hemisphere will soon see cooler temperatures.

In a paper in Physics of Fluids, by AIP Publishing, researchers studied the effects of relative humidity, environmental temperature, and wind speed on the respiratory cloud and virus viability. They found that a critical factor for the transmission of the infectious particles, which are immersed in respiratory clouds of saliva droplets, is evaporation.

“Suppose we have a better understanding of the evaporation and its relation to climate effects. In that case, we can more accurately predict the virus concentration and better determine its viability or the potential for virus survival,” said Dimitris Drikakis, one of the authors.

Despite the importance of airborne droplet transmission, research regarding heat and

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Here’s what science says about airborne transmission of the coronavirus

When the CDC updated its website on Friday to acknowledge that airborne transmission of the coronavirus beyond six feet may play a role in the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly indoors, the update was hailed by infectious disease experts interviewed by ABC News as an overdue step.



a sign on the side of a building: FILE - In this Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2020, file photo, people sit at tables at San Diego State University in San Diego.


© Gregory Bull/AP
FILE – In this Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2020, file photo, people sit at tables at San Diego State University in San Diego.

But on Monday morning, the agency took down that language, saying it was posted in “error.” Despite the CDC guidance whiplash, experts say it’s time to recognize that airborne transmission beyond six feet is possible — while continuing to emphasize that close contact within six feet is still the main way the virus is transmitted.

MORE: CDC abruptly removes new guidance on coronavirus airborne transmission

Scientists maintain that close, person-to-person contact is a main driver of the virus’ spread. This

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CDC abruptly removes guidance about airborne coronavirus transmission, says update ‘was posted in error’ | Health

In language posted Friday and now removed, CDC said Covid-19 most commonly spread between people who are in close contact with one another, and went on to say it’s known to spread “through respiratory droplets or small particles, such as those in aerosols, produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, sings, talks or breathes.”

These particles can cause infection when “inhaled into the nose, mouth, airways, and lungs,” the agency said. “This is thought to be the main way the virus spreads.”

“There is growing evidence that droplets and airborne particles can remain suspended in the air and be breathed in by others, and travel distances beyond 6 feet (for example, during choir practice, in restaurants, or in fitness classes),” the page said in the Friday update, which has since been removed. “In general, indoor environments without good ventilation increase this risk.”

In the Friday update, the CDC had added

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