If the ad industry is serious about transparency, let’s open-source our SDKs

Year after year, a lack of transparency in how ad traffic is sourced, sold and measured is cited by advertisers as a source of frustration and a barrier to entry in working with various providers. But despite progress on the protection and privacy of data through laws like GDPR and COPPA, the overall picture regarding ad-marketing transparency has changed very little.

In part, this is due to the staggering complexity of how programmatic and other advertising technologies work. With automated processes managing billions of impressions every day, there is no universal solution to making things more simple and clear. So the struggle for the industry is not necessarily a lack of intent around transparency, but rather how to deliver it.

Frustratingly, evidence shows that the way data is collected and used by some industry players has played a large part in reducing people’s trust in online advertising. This is not

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Amsterdam and Helsinki launch algorithm registries to bring transparency to public deployments of AI

Amsterdam and Helsinki today launched AI registries to detail how each city government uses algorithms to deliver services, some of the first major cities in the world to do so. An AI Register for each city was introduced in beta today as part of the Next Generation Internet Policy Summit, organized in part by the European Commission and the city of Amsterdam. The Amsterdam registry currently features a handful of algorithms, but it will be extended to include all algorithms following the collection of feedback at the virtual conference to lay out a European vision of the future of the internet, according to a city official.

Each algorithm cited in the registry lists datasets used to train a model, a description of how an algorithm is used, how humans utilize the prediction, and how algorithms were assessed for potential bias or risks. The registry also provides citizens a way

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New body camera policy in New York aims for more transparency after death of Daniel Prude

New York’s attorney general said Sunday that her office will begin “proactively” releasing police body camera footage in cases where unarmed civilians die at the hands of officers, a move prompted by the suffocation death earlier this year of Daniel Prude in Rochester.

State Attorney General Letitia James said the new policy, which is effective immediately and aims to bring more transparency to investigations that her office is handling, will no longer allow local police agencies to determine when to release footage.

“This process has caused confusion, delays and has hampered transparency in a system that should be as open as possible,” she said. Instead of waiting “months and months,” James said, her office’s special prosecutions unit will begin releasing footage after it has been shown to relatives of victims.

James said the policy was

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