This COVID-19 Passport Could Help Restart International Travel

Given the massive decrease in international airline travel caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, airline executives have maintained that testing passengers could make flights safer and encourage prospective passengers to get back in the air. Airlines such as Emirates, Etihad and United are already starting testing programs for their flights at airports. But a new pass that is starting to test this week could open borders worldwide on a much broader basis.

Launched by the World Economic Forum and The Commons Project Foundation, a Swiss-based nonprofit, in conjunction with representatives of 37 countries in six continents, the digital pass CommonPass is starting international trials showing a passenger’s COVID-19 status while protecting other health information. Cathay Pacific Airlines is set to operate a trial between Hong Kong International Airport and Singapore Changi

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Already Weak, Air Travel Demand Is Fading. And Business Travel Demand Will Be Soft Whenever It Returns

The global decline in air travel will be worse than previously forecast and a new report on corporations’ plans for travel through 2021 shows that the recovery of business travel demand will continue to be sluggish even after one or more Covid-19 vaccines become available, hopefully, in the first half of 2021.

The International Air Transport Association, the airline industry’s global trade group, said Tuesday that global passenger traffic this year will be down a whopping 66% from 2019. Previously IATA had forecast a decline of 63%.

While the revised view is only 3 percentage points worse than IATA’s previous forecast, the enormous numbers of passenger miles

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Will new travel technology invade your privacy?

The tech revolution in the travel world, accelerated by the COVID-19 pandemic, is at once marvelous and invasive of your privacy. Apps, facial recognition, and smart products can make air transit and border crossings more convenient. Their touch-free and skip-the-line elements may help keep you safer from illness-causing viruses.



A gloved security staffer scans a traveler’s smartphone inside of Greece’s Athens International Airport on September 17, 2020.


© Photograph by Yorgos Karahalis, Bloomberg/Getty Images

A gloved security staffer scans a traveler’s smartphone inside of Greece’s Athens International Airport on September 17, 2020.


New tech may also speed up the return to normal travel, like the the World Economic Forum and The Commons Project collaboration CommonPass initiative, which aims to allow governments to validate individuals’ COVID testing and, eventually, vaccination credentials.

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But such innovation comes with some risks. For a cautionary tale about travel technology and data security, look no further than a recent episode involving former Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott, who posted a photo of

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Adelman Travel Unveils Innovation in the Future of Pre-trip Approval

Hot Spot Approvals is a self-service, web-based solution focused on real-time employee safety

MILWAUKEE, Sept. 29, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Corporate clients of Adelman Travel, with travel originating from the U.S., now have access to Hot Spot Approvals, a proprietary pre-trip approval technology designed to help them identify domestic and international high-risk locations and automatically approve or deny travel bookings based on a company’s requirements.

“Due to the global pandemic, travel protocols and requirements are changing constantly, and companies need to be able to evaluate risks and trigger approval requirements in real-time based on the destinations they choose,” said Steve Cline, President and COO of Adelman Travel. “Inclusive of our return to travel strategy and consultation with our customers, understanding their duty of care program and priorities, we are able to incorporate a solution that empowers them to keep their travelers safe and mitigate risks.”

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Travel activities platform KKDay raises $75 million Series C as it focuses on “staycations”

With lockdowns around the world, the COVID-19 pandemic has hit the travel industry especially hard. In Asia, however, several startups are adapting by focusing on domestic activities (or “staycations”) instead of international travel. They include Taipei-based KKday, which announced today that it has closed a $75 million Series C led by Cool Japan Fund and the National Development Fund of Taiwan. Existing investors Monk’s Hill Ventures and MindWorks Capital also returned for the round.

Founded in 2014, KKDay will use its new funding on Rezio, a booking management platform it began piloting in March, starting with Japan and Taiwan.

Created for tour operators and activity providers, especially those who previously operated mostly offline, Rezio can help reduce operational costs by allowing its users to set up a booking website that works with different payment gateways and manage availability by tracking bookings from different channels. The latter is especially important during

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Time Travel Theoretically Possible Without Leading To Paradoxes, Researchers Say : NPR

A dog dressed as Marty McFly from Back to the Future attends the 25th Annual Tompkins Square Halloween Dog Parade in 2015. New research says time travel might be possible without the problems McFly encountered.

Timothy A. Clary/AFP via Getty Images


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A dog dressed as Marty McFly from Back to the Future attends the 25th Annual Tompkins Square Halloween Dog Parade in 2015. New research says time travel might be possible without the problems McFly encountered.

Timothy A. Clary/AFP via Getty Images

“The past is obdurate,” Stephen King wrote in his book about a man who goes back in time to prevent the Kennedy assassination. “It doesn’t want to be changed.”

Turns out, King might have been onto something.

Countless science fiction tales have explored the paradox of what would happen if you do something in the past that endangers

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Pompeo to Travel to Mediterranean Countries and Vatican to Bolster Ties, Promote Religious Freedom

WASHINGTON—Secretary of State Mike Pompeo will travel next week to Greece, Italy, the Holy See and Croatia in a bid to shore up bilateral ties and promote religious freedom.

In Greece, Mr. Pompeo will undertake measures to improve economic ties and security cooperation between the nations. The secretary and Greek officials will sign a memorandum of understanding on science and technology.

While the top U.S. diplomat’s visit to Greece last October was limited to Athens, Mr. Pompeo next week will visit both Thessaloniki, home to Foreign Minister Nikos Dendias, and Crete, home to Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis. On Crete, Mr. Pompeo will visit U.S. Naval Support Activity Souda Bay.

The trip will be the first by a U.S. secretary of state to Thessaloniki, which a senior department official described as a “gateway to the Balkans in terms of investment and trade.”

Mr. Pompeo also will host a gathering of leaders

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Young physicist ‘squares the numbers’ on time travel — ScienceDaily

Paradox-free time travel is theoretically possible, according to the mathematical modelling of a prodigious University of Queensland undergraduate student.

Fourth-year Bachelor of Advanced Science (Honours) student Germain Tobar has been investigating the possibility of time travel, under the supervision of UQ physicist Dr Fabio Costa.

“Classical dynamics says if you know the state of a system at a particular time, this can tell us the entire history of the system,” Mr Tobar said.

“This has a wide range of applications, from allowing us to send rockets to other planets and modelling how fluids flow.

“For example, if I know the current position and velocity of an object falling under the force of gravity, I can calculate where it will be at any time.

“However, Einstein’s theory of general relativity predicts the existence of time loops or time travel — where an event can be both in the past and future

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Young physicist ‘squares the numbers’ on time travel

time travel
Credit: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain

Paradox-free time travel is theoretically possible, according to the mathematical modeling of a prodigious University of Queensland undergraduate student.


Fourth-year Bachelor of Advanced Science (Honours) student Germain Tobar has been investigating the possibility of time travel, under the supervision of UQ physicist Dr. Fabio Costa.

“Classical dynamics says if you know the state of a system at a particular time, this can tell us the entire history of the system,” Mr Tobar said.

“This has a wide range of applications, from allowing us to send rockets to other planets and modeling how fluids flow.

“For example, if I know the current position and velocity of an object falling under the force of gravity, I can calculate where it will be at any time.

“However, Einstein’s theory of general relativity predicts the existence of time loops or time travel—where an event can be both in the past

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Can airport testing and Covid immunity passports unlock travel?

In the current Covid-created travel maze, passengers face constantly shifting rules as airports, countries and even airlines impose their own restrictions on who can cross international borders.



Respiratory therapist Diana Vega from University Medical Center of Southern Nevada collects coronavirus (COVID-19) tests in specimen sampling tubes during a preview of a new COVID-19 testing site inside Cashman Center on August 3, 2020 in Las Vegas, Nevada. UMC and the Nevada National Guard will operate the site in partnership with the city of Las Vegas beginning tomorrow. This weekend, Nevada passed the 50,000 mark in reported positive COVID-19 cases.


© Ethan Miller/Getty Images
Respiratory therapist Diana Vega from University Medical Center of Southern Nevada collects coronavirus (COVID-19) tests in specimen sampling tubes during a preview of a new COVID-19 testing site inside Cashman Center on August 3, 2020 in Las Vegas, Nevada. UMC and the Nevada National Guard will operate the site in partnership with the city of Las Vegas beginning tomorrow. This weekend, Nevada passed the 50,000 mark in reported positive COVID-19 cases.



a man wearing a hat: Family medicine Dr Nandini Sathi swabs Ander Malevran for his COVID test. Rick Madonik/Toronto Star via Getty Images


© Rick Madonik/Toronto Star via Getty Images
Family medicine Dr Nandini Sathi swabs Ander Malevran for his COVID test. Rick Madonik/Toronto Star via Getty Images

Testing has been adopted by various places as a key to allowing transit, leading to more widespread calls from the travel industry to

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