Animal study shows treatment blocks inflammation and protects lungs without killing the flu virus — ScienceDaily

The raging lung inflammation that can contribute to death from the flu can be stopped in its tracks by a drug derived from a naturally occurring human protein, a new animal study suggests.

In mouse studies, all untreated animals given a lethal dose of influenza died within days. All but one of the infected mice treated with the experimental therapy not only survived, but remained energetic and kept weight on — despite having high levels of the flu virus in their lungs.

The experimental treatment is a heavy dose of MG53, part of a family of proteins that plays an essential role in cell membrane repair. Already identified as a potential therapy for conditions ranging from Alzheimer’s disease to persistent skin wounds, MG53 was found in this study to prevent death from a lethal flu infection by blocking excessive inflammation — without having any effect on the virus itself.

The

Read More

As Trump hails Regeneron’s COVID-19 treatment, his administration tries to block the science it used

By Maggie Fox | CNN

President Donald Trump has been celebrating the dose of experimental monoclonal antibodies he was given last Friday, saying he thinks it helped him vanquish his coronavirus infection in record time.

“It was incredible the impact it had,” he said in a video he tweeted Thursday.

What he didn’t say is that the treatment was developed using technology his administration has worked for four years to ban.

It has to do with abortion politics, and the science of using human tissue to test and to make medicines. Regeneron’s therapy indirectly relied on tissue taken from an abortion.

Trump’s base, of course, is strongly against abortion rights and his administration acted quickly to reverse many Obama era policies — including policies that moved forward scientific research involving human fetal tissue.

Especially involved are human embryonic stem cells, made using days-old embryos, usually taken from fertility clinics. They’re

Read More

Science behind medicine and chemistry Nobels, and hepatitis C & its treatment in India



a close up of a coin


© Provided by The Print


New Delhi: Harvey Alter and Charles Rice from the US, and Michael Houghton from the UK won the Nobel Prize in Medicine for discovering the hepatitis C virus.

The 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was shared, for the first time, by two women — French microbiologist, geneticist, and biochemist Emmanuelle Charpentier and American biochemist Jennifer A. Doudna, for inventing a genetic ‘scissors’ that allows scientists to ‘cut and paste’ inside a genome sequence.

In episode 588 of ‘Cut the Clutter’, ThePrint’s Editor-in-Chief Shekhar Gupta decodes the science behind the two wins.

Hepatitis C virus discovery

Harvey Alter, the chief infectious diseases investigator at National Institute of Health in the US, did a lot of his early work at a big blood banking system in Bethesda, Maryland on the outskirts of Washington, DC in the 1970s.

Michael Houghton is head of Li Ka Shing Virology Institute

Read More

As Trump hails Regeneron treatment, his administration tries to block the science it used

President Donald Trump has been celebrating the dose of experimental monoclonal antibodies he was given last Friday, saying he thinks it helped him vanquish his coronavirus infection in record time.



a sign on the side of a building: A logo sign outside of the headquarters of Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., in Tarrytown, New York on November 21, 2015. Photo by Kristoffer Tripplaar *** Please Use Credit from Credit Field ***


© Kristoffer Tripplaar/SIPA/Sipa USA/AP
A logo sign outside of the headquarters of Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., in Tarrytown, New York on November 21, 2015. Photo by Kristoffer Tripplaar *** Please Use Credit from Credit Field ***

“It was incredible the impact it had,” he said in a video he tweeted Thursday.

What he didn’t say is that the treatment was developed using technology his administration has worked for four years to ban.

It has to do with abortion politics, and the science of using human tissue to test and to make medicines. Regeneron’s therapy indirectly relied on tissue taken from an abortion.

Trump’s base, of course, is strongly against abortion rights and his administration acted quickly to reverse many Obama

Read More

Study: New bedside test means faster diagnosis, treatment of COVID-19

Oct. 8 (UPI) — A rapid, bedside test for COVID-19 delivers results in less than two hours, meaning that appropriate treatment can be initiated earlier for those already hospitalized because of their symptoms, according to a study published Thursday by The Lancet Respiratory Medicine.

The standard COVID-19 test uses polymerase chain reaction, or PCR, technology, which amplifies small samples of DNA in order to identify the presence of virus in samples taken from an infected person’s nose or throat.

The PCR test requires samples to be sent to a centralized lab within the hospital for processing, typically takes more than 20 hours to produce results, the researchers said.

The enhanced speed of the bedside, or “point-of-care” tests, also means patients infected with the new coronavirus can be isolated earlier, reducing the risk for transmission to other patients and healthcare workers.

“Our findings are the first to suggest the clinical benefits

Read More

Rare Earth Metals Get The Presidential Treatment

Last Wednesday, the president signed an executive order addressing the threat posed by the United States’ overreliance on “critical minerals” from “foreign adversaries.”

To be more specific, “critical minerals” here means “rare earth metals,” and “foreign adversaries” means “China.”

Although not as rare as gold, the group of 17 metals are used in the manufacture of advanced technologies, including electric vehicles, wind turbines and missile guidance systems. Your iPhone contains a number of them. Each F-35 fighter jet has about half a ton of these strategic elements.

The problem is that the U.S. no longer produces barite (used in fracking), gallium (semiconductors, 5G telecommunications), graphite (smartphone batteries) and a number of other materials. “For 31 of the 35 critical minerals, the United States imports more than half of its annual consumption,” according to the press release.

Today, China controls some 80 percent to 95 percent of the world market,

Read More

Study shows antibiotics may be viable treatment option for appendicitis — ScienceDaily

Every year more than 250,000 people undergo surgery for appendicitis, making it one of the 20 most common surgeries performed in the United States.

In the largest randomized U.S. study of appendicitis published today in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers from Henry Ford Health System and 24 other sites around the U.S. report that seven in 10 patients who received antibiotics avoided surgery and that patients who took antibiotics for symptom relief fared no worse in the short term than those who underwent surgery.

Still, researchers cautioned that taking antibiotics for appendicitis is not for everyone and advised patients to consult with their physician.

“The significance of this study means that surgeons and patients now have more options for the treatment of appendicitis,” says J.H. “Pat” Patton, M.D., medical director of Surgical Services for Henry Ford Health System and a study co-investigator. “We now know that we

Read More

Wastewater Treatment Industry Veteran Keith Williams Joins BCR as Vice President of Sales and Marketing

Today BCR announced that Keith Williams has joined the company as vice president of sales and marketing. Bringing more than 38 years of experience across water and wastewater treatment technologies, Mr. Williams will lead BCR’s sales team with a focus on municipal markets. This will include managing and growing industry relationships with rep firms who bring technologies to municipal wastewater treatment plants within their regional markets.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201005005806/en/

Water industry Veteran, Keith Williams, joins BCR Inc. to head up Sales and Marketing. (Photo: Business Wire)

“We are excited to have Keith onboard to continue to grow sales outreach across the range of decision makers involved with the selection of biosolids process technology,” said Joshua Scott, BCR CEO. “With Keith’s sales leadership and guidance, our goal is to become one of the industry leaders for biosolids treatment technology.”

“As I learned more

Read More

Nitric oxide a possible treatment for COVID-19, study finds — ScienceDaily

Researchers at Uppsala University have found that an effective way of treating the coronavirus behind the 2003 SARS epidemic also works on the closely related SARS-CoV-2 virus, the culprit in the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The substance concerned is nitric oxide (NO), a compound with antiviral properties that is produced by the body itself. The study is published in the journal Redox Biology.

“To our knowledge, nitric oxide is the only substance shown so far to have a direct effect on SARS-CoV-2,” says Åke Lundkvist, a professor at Uppsala University, who led the study.

Since there is still no effective cure for COVID-19, the main emphasis in the treatments tested has been on relieving symptoms. This can shorten hospital stays and reduce mortality. To date, however, it has not been possible to prove that any of these treatments has affected the actual virus behind the infection.

Nitric oxide (NO) is

Read More

Identification of this epigenetic process highlights potential drug treatment strategies for early-stage disease treatment — ScienceDaily

New findings suggest that late-onset Alzheimer’s Disease is driven by epigenetic changes — how and when certain genes are turned on and off — in the brain. Results were published today in Nature Genetics.

Research led by Raffaella Nativio, PhD, a former research associate of Epigenetics, Shelley Berger, PhD, a professor of Genetics, Biology and Cell and Developmental Biology and Director of the Epigenetics Institute, and Nancy Bonini, PhD, a professor of Biology and Cell and Developmental Biology, all in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, used post-mortem brain tissue to compare healthy younger and older brain cells to those with Alzheimer’s Disease. The team found evidence that epigenetic regulators disable protective pathways and enable pro-disease pathways in those with the disease.

“The last five years have seen great efforts to develop therapeutics to treat Alzheimer’s disease, but sadly, they have failed in the clinic

Read More