Nvidia and Huawei face uncertain future in Britain’s high-tech capital

University of Cambridge

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LONDON — Situated in the middle of China and the U.S., the English university city of Cambridge has found itself at the center of two massive tech sagas.

U.S. chip maker Nvidia and Chinese hardware manufacturer Huawei have big expansion plans in Cambridge but both companies have big hurdles to overcome if their dreams are to be realized.

Nvidia hopes to acquire Cambridge-headquartered Arm for $40 billion and set up a new “world-class” AI center in the city, while Huawei plans to build a £1 billion ($1.3 billion) research lab in Sawston, located roughly eight miles from Cambridge city center.

Renowned for being one of the world’s greatest intellectual powerhouses, Cambridge is home to thousands of tech workers and companies like Amazon, Microsoft and Apple all employ highly-educated research teams in the city. “Lots of tech companies want to get foothold in

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Chinese Americans look to new platforms as WeChat’s future remains uncertain

Back in April, when New York City was in the grips of COVID-19, Yuan Mingyue relied on WeChat to keep in touch with relatives in China, to check on their health and to share how things were in New York.

The social media app’s video call function, similar to FaceTime, proved especially useful as a lifeline for Yuan, who came to the United States 10 years ago and lives in Queens, once America’s center for Covid-19.

While FaceTime works for Apple customers, not everyone in China owns an iPhone or another Apple device.

So when President Donald Trump’s WeChat ban was to take effect Sunday — even as a federal judge temporarily put the brakes on his order — Yuan began the dizzying task, like so many other Chinese Americans, of figuring out workarounds.

“We can use other Chinese platforms, like Sina Weibo or QQ, or otherwise just make a

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The Technology 202: TikTok’s future is uncertain as backlash mounts in Washington

Trump, who previously pushed for a full sale of the TikTok service to an American company and threatened to otherwise ban the service, added that he expects to be briefed today on the proposal to make Oracle TikTok’s “trusted technology partner.”

“It has to be 100 percent as far as national security is concerned, and no, I’m not prepared to sign off on anything,” Trump said. “I have to see the deal.” 

The proximity to Nov. 3 makes it a toss-up whether Trump will seek a tough line on China – or compromise and call it a win. 

The key question is whether the deal proposed earlier this week to outsource data management to Oracle would do enough to address national security concerns that ByteDance could share Americans’ data with the Chinese government. 

Top administration officials, including Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, have raised concerns about such an arrangement, according

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