Hidden camera’s hugging tiger wins wildlife photo award

The embrace by Sergey Gorshkov, Russia
Sergey Gorshkov’s winning WPY image is called The Embrace

To photograph one of rarest creatures on Earth you have to be incredibly skilled and remarkably lucky.

But Sergey Gorshkov is clearly both – as demonstrated by his stunning picture of a Siberian, or Amur, tiger deep in the forests of Russia’s Far East.

The image has just won him the title of Wildlife Photographer of the Year.

The female tiger is seen embracing a tree, rubbing herself up against the bark to leave her scent and mark territory in Leopard National Park.

“The lighting, the colours, the texture – it’s like an oil painting,” says WPY chair of judges Roz Kidman-Cox.

“It’s almost as if the tiger is part of the forest. Her tail blends with the roots of the tree. The two are one,” she told BBC News.

All the more extraordinary is that this is a camera-trap image.

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Freshwater Wildlife Continues To Decline But New Energy Trendlines Suggest We Can Bend That Curve

Last month I wrote about the 86% decline in populations of migratory fish since 1970. Turns out that was just a trailer for the feature film.

In September, WWF released its Living Planet Report, which includes the grim statistic that essentially all vertebrate species that depend on freshwater ecosystems are following the same precipitous plunge as migratory fish.

How the world developed its energy systems, particularly hydropower dams that fragmented rivers, is one of the primary reasons for this dramatically dropping trendline. 

How the world designs, builds and operates its future energy systems will be key to halting, and ultimately reversing that trendline.

The current decline in freshwater populations is tracked by the “Living Planet Index” (LPI), which provides insights into the health of global wildlife, much like an index fund provides insights into the health of financial markets. And just as an index fund reflects the prices

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Wildlife conservation undermines the rights of indigenous people and local communities in India

Wildlife conservation undermines the rights of indigenous people and local communities in India
Featured map in the EJAtlas. Credit: Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona

An interactive map developed by the Environmental Justice Atlas team at the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB) reveals that certain forms of wildlife conservation undermine the rights of indigenous people and local communities living within protected areas across India.


The interactive map, led by ICTA-UAB researcher Eleonora Fanari and carried out in collaboration with India’s environmental organization Kalpavriksh, has been launched during the India’s National Wildlife Week. The map is a product of three years of extensive research covering 26 protected areas, carried out in association with numerous organizations, activists and independent scholars, struggling against violations across the ground and in the courts.

A strict protect-and-conserve model, favored by a powerful Indian conservation lobby, has increased the network of protected areas from 67 in 1988 to 870 in 2020. However, these lands

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Using Drones to Rescue Wildlife From Climate Disasters

Douglas Thron travels to fire-ravaged forests and towns struck by hurricanes to save animals among the rubble.

▲ A dog left stranded among the ruins of Hurricane Dorian in the Bahamas in 2019.

Source: Courtesy Douglas Thron

Scientists have long deployed drones to do everything from counting caribou to collecting whale snot. Now the flying machines are helping to rescue animals as climate change takes an increasingly deadly toll on wildlife.  

For the past year, a California videographer named Douglas Thron has chased climate catastrophes around the world, piloting drones outfitted with infrared cameras and spotlights to help find survivors of hurricanes and firestorms whose frequency and intensity are growing with rising temperatures. After Thron locates the animals, wildlife rescuers can move them to safety.

“The potential for these drones to save animals, whether wild or domestic, and

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USGS Science at The Wildlife Society 2020 Conference

Symposia 

 

Monday 9/28 Sessions 

  • Sagebrush ecosystem (USGS image).

Anthropogenic Subsidies and Wildlife: The Good, the Bad, and the Unintended Consequences of Food and Shelter Subsidies for Wildlife 

Shawn O’Neil and others: Impacts of subsidized ravens on greater sage-grouse populations within sagebrush ecosystems of western North America. 

 

Long-Term Data Sets for Biodiversity Monitoring, Research, and Management 

John Sauer and others: Biometrics for Complex Long-Term Biodiversity Data Sets: Lessons from the Breeding Bird Survey 

John R. Sauer; William A. Link; James E. Hines–Most of our understanding of changes in avian biodiversity in North America is based on analysis of population change from the North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS). The BBS provides data at spatial scales ranging from individual survey locations to continental, but analyses at all scales are complicated by the need to accommodate detectability issues during sampling and changes in sampling effort over space and time. Over the years of

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Camera traps show impact of recreational activity on wildlife

Camera traps show impact of recreational activity on wildlife
Wildlife tended to avoid places that were recently visited by recreational users Credit: Robin Naidoo

The COVID-19 pandemic has fired up interest in outdoor activities in our parks and forests. Now a new UBC study highlights the need to be mindful of how these activities may affect wildlife living in protected areas.


Researchers placed motion-activated cameras on the trails in and around the South Chilcotin Mountains Provincial Park in southwestern B.C., a region popular for its wildlife and recreational activities such as hiking, horseback riding, ATV riding and mountain biking. Overall, they found that environmental factors—like the elevation or the condition of the forest around a camera location—were generally more important than human activity in determining how often wildlife used the trails.

However, there were still significant impacts. Deeper analysis of trail use captured by the cameras showed that all wildlife tended to avoid places that were recently visited by

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Hudson River Park’s Annual Submerge Marine Science Festival Offers Virtual Science And Wildlife Programming

Kids will be able to see and learn more about native Hudson River wildlife and more.

Today, the Hudson River Park Trust’s River Project unveiled a jam packed lineup of virtual lessons as part of their annual SUBMERGE Marine Science Festival on Thursday, September 24. The marine science festival that usually brings kids of all ages to the New York City waterfront will instead host a full day of interactive virtual science available to anyone, regardless of location.

This marine-focused STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) festival covenes educators, scientists and performers to bring marine science to life, including along the city’s waterways. By incorporating a wide range of fun, interactive educational activities, the festival aims to engage children with marine science and help them learn about the ecological importance of Hudson River Park’s 400-acre unique Estuarine Sanctuary.

“Every year we bring science to life for students in all five

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