Japan firms fall woefully short of meeting government goals on women in management: Reuters poll

By Tetsushi Kajimoto

TOKYO (Reuters) – About one-fifth of Japanese companies have no female managers and most say women account for less than 10% of management, a Reuters monthly poll found, highlighting the struggle for the government’s “womenomics” drive to make headway.

The survey results come as Japan is seen to delay its target this year to raise the share of women in leadership posts to 30% as part of the government’s campaign to empower women, dubbed “womenomics”, and cope with Japan’s ageing population.

The Reuters Corporate Survey, conducted Sept. 29-Oct. 8, found 71% of Japanese firms said women accounted for less than 10% of management, while 17% had no female managers at all.

Asked how much scope there was to increase female managers, 55% said by around 10%, a quarter said by about 20%, one in 10 firms said by around 30%, while 5% saw no room for that.

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Nasdaq Women in Technology: Niharika Sharma, Senior Software Engineer, Nasdaq’s Machine Intelligence Lab

Women in Tech: Niharika Sharma

Niharika Sharma is a Senior Software Engineer for Nasdaq’s Machine Intelligence Lab. She designs systems that gather, process and apply machine learning/natural language processing technologies on natural language data, generating valuable insights to support business decisions. Over the past years, she worked on Natural Language Generation (NLG) and Surveillance Automation for Nasdaq Advisory Services. We sat down with Niharika to learn more about how she got her start in computer science and how she approaches challenges in her career.

Can you describe your day-to-day as a senior software engineer at Nasdaq?

My day-to-day work involves collaborating with Data Scientists to solve problems, ideating business possibilities with product teams and working with Data/Software Engineers to transform ideas into solutions.

How did you become involved in the technology industry, and how has technology influenced your role?

My first exposure to Computer Science was a Logo programming class that I took as a

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Command Alkon’s Emily Branum Recognized As One of Birmingham Business Journal’s Women to Watch

Winners Comprised of Birmingham Women Who Have Distinguished Themselves in Their Companies, Their Industries, and The Community

Emily Branum

Emily Branum, Chief Strategy and Legal Officer at Command Alkon, has been named a one of the Birmingham Business Journal's Women to Watch for 2020.
Emily Branum, Chief Strategy and Legal Officer at Command Alkon, has been named a one of the Birmingham Business Journal’s Women to Watch for 2020.
Emily Branum, Chief Strategy and Legal Officer at Command Alkon, has been named a one of the Birmingham Business Journal’s Women to Watch for 2020.

BIRMINGHAM, Ala., Oct. 12, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Command Alkon, provider of the leading supplier collaboration platform for construction’s heavy work, announces that Emily Branum, Chief Strategy and Legal Officer at Command Alkon, was chosen as one of Birmingham Business Journal’s Women to Watch for 2020. This honorary list is comprised of record-breaking women who serve as key leaders in their companies or organizations. Additionally, this recognition highlights women who show potential to shape the future of Birmingham’s business world, and

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Opinion: Jackie Waring: Ada’s science and technology legacy lives on for women

TODAY is Ada Lovelace Day, an international celebration of the achievements of women in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM).

Ada, the daughter of the poet Lord Byron and his mathematics-loving wife Annabella Milbanke, showed her gift for mathematics at an early age introducing many computer concepts in the 19th century. However, nearly 150 years since her death, Ada’s legacy reminds us of the work still to be done to create access to more females in STEM-related fields.

According to 2019 UK Government data, women make up 24% of the core-STEM workforce. While this figure is rising, albeit slowly, in some STEM sectors, it appears to be flat-lining in technology where females account for just 17% of the workforce.

Here in Scotland there are a number of other bodies seeking to address this gender imbalance, including the Royal Society of Edinburgh (RSE), an internationally renowned science-focused organisation currently run by

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Northwestern Mutual to Host First-of-its-Kind Virtual Women in Tech Conference | News

MILWAUKEE, Oct. 12, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Northwestern Mutual today announced the company will host its first Women in Tech Conference on December 3. This virtual conference will gather top companies nationwide, women technologists, and their allies for a full-day event focused on professional development, empowerment and collaboration with the ultimate goal of fostering a more diverse and inclusive tech industry and community.

The free event will begin with an inspiring keynote from world-class athlete, fitness and wellness expert Laila Ali and will be followed by concurrent breakout sessions packed with diverse perspectives and industry insights on a range of topics, including DevOps, CICD (continuous integration/continuous design), innovation, cloud computing, event driven architecture, data and more. Networking opportunities to connect with other event attendees will be available throughout the day.

“Gender equity is important for our teams, businesses and society to thrive, and with technology at the center of

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WVSU president to speak at virtual Women & Technology Conference | Metro Kanawha

West Virginia State University President Dr. Nicole Pride will be the keynote speaker for the 2020 West Virginia Women & Technology Conference, to be offered online this year in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic.

South Charleston-based TechConnect West Virginia is hosting this year’s virtual conference, which is free to view online. It will begin at 9 a.m. and conclude at noon on Monday, Oct. 19.

As in years past, the 2020 webinar/conference will address the under-representation of women in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) fields and explore strategies for closing the gender gap in technology.

Pride started her career in the corporate and nonprofit sectors, moving later to the higher education field at North Carolina A&T State University. She was named the first female president at the Institute university in July and became the school’s 12th president in September.

A pair of panel discussions will follow Pride’s remarks.

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Why Covid could remove barriers for women in the car industry

Astrid Fontaine

Image caption

Astrid Fontaine thinks the changes forced on firms by Covid-19 could reap significant benefits

“When I went to university, we were three girls out of 120 students studying mechanical engineering,” says Dr Astrid Fontaine.

“Who do you have in a company that’s engineering driven? It’s people who have studied science, technology, maths, engineering – and these were subjects in the past that mainly boys tended to study.”

Dr Fontaine is a board member at Bentley, the Volkswagen-owned British luxury carmaker. She is trying to explain to me why senior female executives like her are still a relative rarity in the car industry, even though women make up an increasingly large proportion of the market – and in the UK alone own some 35% of the cars on the road.

She is also setting out why she thinks the crisis in the industry sparked by the Covid-19 pandemic may

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The Leadership, focusing on women in STEM, is a timely documentary that avoids answering the big questions. | The Canberra Times

whats-on, music-theatre-arts, The Leadership, film review

The Leadership (M, 97 minutes) 3 stars Taking a group of professional women on a three-week cruise combined with a leadership workshop was an inspired idea. No doubt about it. The trip to the exquisite, endangered wilderness of Antarctica would be a reminder of what science was fighting for. The journey would offer a fundamental reset for the participants who had been selected from the fields of science, engineering, technology, mathematics (STEM) and medicine. It was designed to help them become the sort of the leaders they “hoped to be”, honing the skills necessary for contributing to meaningful and necessary policy change around the world. Course leader Fabian Dattner had lofty hopes that were even underpinned by a great quote from poet T. S. Eliot. The prominent businesswoman, leadership consultant, and self-described dreamer has a background in corporate consultancy. No doubt the women participating,

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Amid a boom in SPACs, few women investors

If you’ve been following the SPAC boom, you may have noticed something about these blank-check vehicles that are springing up left and right in order to take public privately held companies. They are being organized mostly by men.

It’s not surprising, given the relative dearth of women in senior financial positions in banking and the venture industry. But it also begs the question of whether women, already hustling to overcome a wealth gap, could be left behind if the trend gains momentum.

Consider that studies have shown women investors are are twice as likely to invest in startups with at least one female founder, and more than three times as likely to invest in startups with female CEOs. It’s not a huge leap to imagine that women-led SPACs might also be more inclined to identify women-led companies with which to merge and take public.

More, the SPAC sponsors themselves are

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Scientist Emma Camp Is Saving Coral Reefs, Promoting Women

Amid a global pandemic, another disaster was unfolding early this year beneath the ocean waters off the coast of Australia. Thanks to climate change, surface water temperatures across the Great Barrier Reef had hit record highs. The habitat had already suffered mass bleaching events caused by high water temperatures in 2017 and 2016, with the latter being the worst ever recorded, killing 22% of corals in the massive reef. By this April, the new damage was clear: the reef had endured the most widespread bleaching event ever recorded, as corals expelled the symbiotic algae that serve as their food source and give them their color.

With a quarter of all ocean fish depending on reefs during their life cycles, scientists say we urgently need to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions to preserve the essential habitats. “Unfortunately we aren’t acting quick enough on climate change, and that leaves a real problem for coral

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