Cyber warriors sound warning on working from home

Cyber warriors on NATO’s eastern edge are warning that the growing number of people working from home globally due to the pandemic is increasing vulnerability to cyber attacks.

The Baltic state of Estonia hosts two cyber facilities for the Western military alliance — set up following a series of cyber attacks from neighbour Russia more than a decade ago.

“Large scale use of remote work has attracted spies, thieves and thugs,” Jaak Tarien, head of NATO’s Cooperative Cyber Defence Centre of Excellence (CCDCOE), told AFP in an interview.

The increased amount of information travelling between institutional servers and home networks is creating new challenges for employers.

“Tackling these new challenges is complicated and requires a lot of resources as well as a different kind of approach,” Tarien said.

“We are likely only scratching the surface in assessing the magnitude of malicious activities taking place in the Covid-era busy cyberspace.”

An

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Researchers are working on tech so machines can thermally ‘breathe’ — ScienceDaily

In the era of electric cars, machine learning and ultra-efficient vehicles for space travel, computers and hardware are operating faster and more efficiently. But this increase in power comes with a trade-off: They get superhot.

To counter this, University of Central Florida researchers are developing a way for large machines to “breathe” in and out cooling blasts of water to keep their systems from overheating.

The findings are detailed in a recent study in the journal Physical Review Fluids.

The process is much like how humans and some animals breath in air to cool their bodies down, except in this case, the machines would be breathing in cool blasts of water, says Khan Rabbi, a doctoral candidate in UCF’s Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and lead author of the study.

“Our technique used a pulsed water-jet to cool a hot titanium surface,” Rabbi says. “The more water we

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San Antonio company working with military, SpaceX to move cargo anywhere in world in an hour or less

A San Antonio company is partnering with the military and SpaceX to move cargo anywhere in the world in an hour using commercial spacecraft — including vertical-landing rockets built in Texas.

U.S. Transportation Command, which is responsible for moving military personnel and equipment around the world, said it’s working with Exploration Architecture, or XArc, and Elon Musk’s SpaceX to develop “rapid transportation through space” capabilities.

XArc, with six employees, is responsible for determining what’s needed on the ground to launch and land commercial spacecraft around the world.

The collaboration is the latest development in Texas’ still-expanding role in space travel and could help the U.S. military more quickly respond to threats and humanitarian crises around the world.

The aim is to use commercial space vehicles, including SpaceX’s Starship, to deliver payloads anywhere in the world. Starship can carry loads of 220,000 pounds.

“Our role is to understand the

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As Delta makes landfall, Southwest Louisiana is still without a working radar

It’s mobile radar to the rescue, and not a moment too soon.



a small clock tower in the middle of a field: The radar dome at the NWS Lake Charles sits on top of a tower that was battered by winds and is now out of commission as another hurricane heads toward it.


© NWS Lake Charles
The radar dome at the NWS Lake Charles sits on top of a tower that was battered by winds and is now out of commission as another hurricane heads toward it.

This is the story of how a moving research radar will be helping the Lake Charles, Louisiana, National Weather Service (NWS) outpost, whose radar was broken during Hurricane Laura.

The Lake Charles NWS office and radar are both located at the Lake Charles Regional Airport, which also took a significant hit during Laura.

The radar dome sits on top of an over 60-foot tower, and since wind speeds are often stronger the higher you go up, this likely led to its demise.

The problem is, the radar equipment is still not fixed, and another hurricane arrived Friday night in the the same area

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Microsoft’s new ‘hybrid workplace’ policy will make working from home a permanent part of the mix

Microsoft’s headquarters in Redmond, Wash. (GeekWire Photo / Monica Nickelsburg)

Microsoft has released new “hybrid workplace” guidance that lays out how employees can have a more flexible remote work schedule and even relocate elsewhere in the country as the tech giant continues to adjust to changing needs during the ongoing pandemic.

The Verge first reported on the internal messaging Friday, saying that Redmond, Wash.-based Microsoft will allow employees to work from home freely for less than 50 percent of their working week, and managers will be able to approve permanent remote work.

RELATED: Death of the HQ? Pandemic hits commercial real estate, but long-term trends still open to debate

Kathleen Hogan, Microsoft’s chief people officer, said in a note to employees that the COVID-19 pandemic has challenged everyone to “think, live, and work in new ways.”

“We will offer as much flexibility as possible to support individual work styles, while

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Call for Award Applicants: Johnson & Johnson Seeks Female Researchers Working in Science, Technology, Engineering, Math, Manufacturing and Design | India Education,Education News India,Education News

Mumbai: Johnson & Johnson today announced that it is accepting applications for its 2021 Women in STEM2D (WiSTEM2D) Scholars Award, aimed at supporting assistant or associate academic professors in the disciplines of Science, Technology, Engineering, Math, Manufacturing and Design. For three years, each recipient will receive mentorship from leaders at Johnson & Johnson and a total $150,000 ($50,000 each year). The deadline for applications is Oct. 15, 2020 at 9 a.m. HST, and guidelines and additional details are available here: https://www.jnj.com/wistem2d-university-scholars.

Launched in June 2017, the Johnson & Johnson WiSTEM2D Scholars Award aspires to fuel development of female STEM2D leaders, and inspire career paths in STEM2D, by supporting the research of the awarded women in their respective STEM2D fields.

Dr. Naama Geva-Zatorsky, one of the 2019 winners of the Johnson & Johnson WiSTEM2D Scholars Award, along with her team of researchers at the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, have

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Flux: Business technology firm helps clients keep working in pandemic

Resilience is part of the business plan at San Antonio-based DOCUmation. The digital imaging and business technology company handled the pandemic like it handles any other shift in the industry — it found a way to adapt.

As essential businesses looked for ways to minimize health risks for their employees, DOCUmation introduced contact-less thermal scanners that took a person’s temperature.

Co-Presidents Hunter Woolfolk and Preston Woolfolk say they learned early on about the need to adapt from their grandfather, Lou Scantland, who still serves as board chairman.

They watched as their father, Scott Woolfolk, and uncle, Lee Scantland, navigated an ever-changing industry. The company mpoved from selling copy machines to opening a print shop and offering information technology, software and phone support.

The brothers, who were born 14 months apart, worked every summer beginning in middle school, but it wasn’t until they graduated from Abilene Christian University that they were

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Business technology firm helps clients keep working in pandemic

Resilience is part of the business plan at San Antonio-based DOCUmation. The digital imaging and business technology company handled the pandemic like it handles any other shift in the industry — it found a way to adapt.

As essential businesses looked for ways to minimize health risks for their employees, DOCUmation introduced contact-less thermal scanners that took a person’s temperature.

Co-presidents Hunter Woolfolk and Preston Woolfolk say they learned early on about the need to adapt from their grandfather, Lou Scantland, who still serves as board chairman.


They watched as their father, Scott Woolfolk, and uncle, Lee Scantland, navigated an ever-changing industry. The company mpoved from selling copy machines to opening a print shop and offering information technology, software and phone support.

The brothers, who were born 14 months apart, worked every summer beginning in middle school, but it wasn’t until they graduated from Abilene Christian University that they were

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A new, more trusting style of leadership is needed to manage people working from home, says tech exec

  • Tech company Splunk has more than 6,000 staff working from home and has adapted to a more trusting style of leadership.
  • Splunk is training leaders and managers to understand employees’ needs as they work remotely, according to its Chief Technical Adviser James Hodge.
  • Having people work from home also means companies have access to a wider talent pool, Hodge said.

LONDON — When the coronavirus pandemic closed workplaces earlier this year, businesses effectively went from having one or more locations to having as many offices as they did employees, as staff worked from home.

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For software company Splunk, this effectively meant going from 35 offices to more than 6,000 “overnight,” according to the firm’s Chief Technical Adviser James Hodge. Having so many people working at home has meant a more trusting style of leadership is necessary, Hodge told CNBC’s “Squawk Box Europe” on Monday.

“The first few months

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Working together to secure our expanding connected health future

Securing medical devices is not a new challenge. Former Vice President Cheney, for example, had the wireless capabilities of a defibrillator disabled when implanted near his heart in 2007, and hospital IT departments and health providers have for years secured medical devices to protect patient data and meet HIPAA requirements.

connected health

With the expansion of security perimeters, the surge in telehealth usage (particularly during COVID-19), and proliferation in the number and types of connected technologies, healthcare cybersecurity has evolved into a more complex and urgent effort.

Today, larger hospital systems have approximately 350,000+ medical devices running simultaneously. On top of this, millions of additional connected devices are maintained by the patients themselves. Over the next 10 years, it’s estimated the number of connected medical devices could increase to roughly 50 billion, driven by innovations such as 5G, edge computing, and more. This rise in connectivity has increased the threat of cyberattacks

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