Annabelle Southcoat, Government Scientist, On The Positive Power Of Champions In The Workplace

In honor of #WorldMentalHealthDay I’d like to share with a story from another inspirational woman in my network. Annabelle Southcoat is a genuine polymath – someone whose intellectual curiosity and drive for humanity and social justice has led her down so many fruitful paths already. Her story is interesting because she so nearly wasn’t. Her story is relevant to business leaders because she demonstrates the value of authentic adjustments to our inclusion practice and how, with the right champion, we can change the course and direction of lives. Ms Southcoat is now a Psychologist at the UK Defence, Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL) a drummer in a band, an innovative thinker and a pussy cat mother.

The Significance Of Childhood Narratives

In Ms Southcoat’s own words. ”I’m also a dyslexic, gay, trans woman (though I tend to just say woman these days) and

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Microsoft’s new ‘hybrid workplace’ policy will make working from home a permanent part of the mix

Microsoft’s headquarters in Redmond, Wash. (GeekWire Photo / Monica Nickelsburg)

Microsoft has released new “hybrid workplace” guidance that lays out how employees can have a more flexible remote work schedule and even relocate elsewhere in the country as the tech giant continues to adjust to changing needs during the ongoing pandemic.

The Verge first reported on the internal messaging Friday, saying that Redmond, Wash.-based Microsoft will allow employees to work from home freely for less than 50 percent of their working week, and managers will be able to approve permanent remote work.

RELATED: Death of the HQ? Pandemic hits commercial real estate, but long-term trends still open to debate

Kathleen Hogan, Microsoft’s chief people officer, said in a note to employees that the COVID-19 pandemic has challenged everyone to “think, live, and work in new ways.”

“We will offer as much flexibility as possible to support individual work styles, while

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How technology will shape the future of the workplace

Iain Fisher, director at ISG, explores how technology will shape the future of the workplace, and allow organisation’s to be more agile and resistant How technology will shape the future of the workplace image

Technology will be essential in helping define the future of the workplace.

Organisations often find it challenging to carry out business transformation projects successfully — and shaping the future of the workplace is no different. While there may be a willingness to change, there are many ways that change projects become stuck in the mire, their momentum stalled by hundreds of micro-actions taken (and not taken) throughout the organisation.

The pandemic changed things.

Businesses have learned that a major change project that would normally have taken six months to a year — such as enabling everyone to work remotely — can be done much faster. Necessity is indeed the mother of invention; innovation happens when people and organisations realise they have to act fast to stay

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The Key Elements of the Smart Workplace

workers connecting with colleagues online from the office and form home


PHOTO:
Shutterstock.

A lot of recent focus on the digital workplace has been on how enterprises are managing the effects of COVID-19.

Many of the technologies introduced into the enterprise over the past six months have responded to immediate and urgent needs – like the introduction of Slack or Teams for communication and collaboration – but these technologies are also precipitating the rise of new, permanent ways of working. 

According to analyst firm Gartner’s recently released “HypeCycle for the Digital Workplace” (behind paywall), enterprises have discovered during the crisis that they need to develop digital resiliency across the workforce after COVID-19 as well as during it. In fact, it was this scramble to build up technology stacks during the pandemic that led to the development of what Gartner describes as the “smart workplace.”

Inside the Digital Workplace Hype

Gartner defines a smart workplace as a workspace that uses

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What new research reveals about rude workplace emails — ScienceDaily

With the advent of the coronavirus pandemic and remote work on the rise, the sheer volume of email exchanges has skyrocketed. Electronic communication is efficient, but it’s also distant and detached, and often can be rude.

Two studies led by a University of Illinois Chicago researcher show that dealing with rude emails at work can create lingering stress and take a toll on your well-being and family life.

The research, published by the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, suggests impolite emails can have a negative effect on work responsibilities, productivity, and can even be linked to insomnia at night, which further relate to negative emotions the next morning.

“Given the prevalent use of emails in the workplace, it is reasonable to conclude this problem is becoming an increasing concern,” said lead author Zhenyu Yuan, assistant professor of managerial studies in the College of Business Administration.

In the first study,

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How Autonomous Vehicles Are Paving The Way For Safety In The Workplace

CEO of Everguard, whose entrepreneurial skills have helped him develop teams, products, and new markets across technologies and industries.

While the concept of self-driving automobiles only gained popularity in the last few decades, the vision of a fully autonomous vehicle was first introduced at the World’s Fair in 1939 by industrialist Norman Bel Geddes. Geddes had a dream of “devices which will correct the faults of human beings as drivers,” according to his book Magic Motorways.

Unfortunately, Geddes was on to something. The tragic reality is that today, 94% of serious crashes are due to human error. That is why automakers and tech heavyweights have partnered to bring Geddes’ vision to life. If most serious crashes are due to human error, it only makes sense to eliminate the human component of driving by deploying fully autonomous vehicles. But how?

Applying Sensor Fusion And AI Technology To Maximize Safety

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What the post-coronavirus workplace might look like

What will the post-Covid workplace look like? Steelcase is one of the largest manufacturers of office furniture — desks, chairs, storage products and office pods — and they have a lot of ideas.



A computer-generated image from interiors contractor Portview shows how office space may be segregated as people go back to the workplace after the coronavirus lockdowns are eased.


© Provided by CNBC
A computer-generated image from interiors contractor Portview shows how office space may be segregated as people go back to the workplace after the coronavirus lockdowns are eased.

They are partnering with MIT to better understand how air circulates in an office environment.

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“Well, we know that the six-foot rule is not as simple as that,” CEO Jim Keane told me. “The science shows that particles travel through the air, depending on whether they’re larger particles or smaller particles, based on models that MIT has built. So, we’re using those models to test different kinds of furniture configurations to identify which furniture will best protect the workforce in the future.”

“In the

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10 Big Tech Trends That Will Influence Tomorrow’s Workplace

With COVID-19 prompting office closures and a sudden shift to remote work, companies have had to adapt to and learn new tech on the fly in recent months, and change is still coming. Even if your organization has adjusted successfully, the “new normal” is an ever-moving target, especially when it comes to technology.

As top industry leaders, the members of Forbes Technology Council strive to identify upcoming tech trends and their potential impact before they arrive. Below, they predict the top 10 trends coming to the workplace and explain how your company can prepare for them.

1. On-Demand Workspaces

Once the pandemic subsides, a large portion of the workforce will continue to stay remote and visit physical offices as necessary. Corporations have to move to on-demand workspaces. Building systems have to

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